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Page 211

LONDON

substitute for railway compartments. He went from the non-smoking to the smoking carriage, and smoked a cigarette, and strayed from his second-class carriage to a first and back. But presently Black Care got aboard the train and came and sat beside him. The exhilaration of escape had evaporated now, and he was presented with a terrible picture of his aunt and uncle arriving at his lodgings and finding him fled. He had left a hasty message that he was called away suddenly on business, 'ver' important business,' and they were to be sumptuously entertained. His immediate motive had been his passionate dread of an encounter between these excellent but unrefined old people and the Walshinghams, but now that end was secured, he could see how thwarted and exasperated they would be.
How to explain to them?
He ought never to have written to tell them !
He ought to have got married, and told them afterwards.
He ought to have consulted Helen.
`Promise me,' she had said.
`Oh, desh !' said Kipps, and got up and walked back into the smoking car and began to consume cigarettes.
Suppose after all, they found out the Walshinghams' address and went there!
At Charing Cross, however, were distractions again. He took a cab in an entirely Walshingham manner, and was pleased to note the enhanced respect of the cabman when he mentioned the Royal Grand. He followed Walshingham's routine on their previous visit with perfect success. They were very nice in the office, and gave him an excellent roorn at fourteen shillings the night.
He went up and spent a considerable time examining the furniture of his room, scrutinising himself in its various mirrors, and sitting on the edge of the bed whistling. It was a vast and splendid apartment, and cheap at fourteen shillings. But finding the figure of Ann inclined to resume possession of his mind, he roused himself and descended by the staircase, after a momentary hesitation before the lift. He had thought of lunch, but he drifted into the great drawing-room, and read a guide to the Hotels of Europe for a space, until a doubt whether he was entitled to use this palatial apartment without extra charge arose in his mind. He would have liked something to eat very much

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE substitute for railway compartments. He went from what is non-smoking to what is smoking carriage, and smoked a cigarette, and strayed from his second-class carriage to a first and back. But presently Black Care got aboard what is train and came and sat beside him. what is exhilaration of escape had evaporated now, and he was presented with a terrible picture of his aunt and uncle arriving at his lodgings and finding him fled. He had left a hasty message that he was called away suddenly on business, 'ver' important business,' and they were to be sumptuously entertained. His immediate motive had been his passionate dread of an encounter between these excellent but unrefined old people and what is Walshinghams, but now that end was secured, he could see how thwarted and exasperated they would be. How to explain to them? He ought never to have written to tell them ! He ought to have got married, and told them afterwards. He ought to have consulted Helen. `Promise me,' she had said. `Oh, desh !' said Kipps, and got up and walked back into what is smoking car and began to consume cigarettes. Suppose after all, they found out what is Walshinghams' address and went there! At Charing Cross, however, were distractions again. He took a cab in an entirely Walshingham manner, and was pleased to note what is enhanced respect of what is cabman when he mentioned what is Royal Grand. He followed Walshingham's routine on their previous what is with perfect success. They were very nice in what is office, and gave him an excellent roorn at fourteen shillings what is night. He went up and spent a considerable time examining what is furniture of his room, scrutinising himself in its various mirrors, and sitting on what is edge of what is bed whistling. It was a vast and splendid apartment, and cheap at fourteen shillings. But finding what is figure of Ann inclined to resume possession of his mind, he roused himself and descended by what is staircase, after a momentary hesitation before what is lift. He had thought of lunch, but he drifted into what is great drawing-room, and read a guide to what is Hotels of Europe for a space, until a doubt whether he was entitled to use this palatial apartment without extra charge arose in his mind. He would have liked something to eat very much where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 211 where is p align="center" where is strong LONDON where is p align="justify" substitute for railway compartments. He went from what is non-smoking to what is smoking carriage, and smoked a cigarette, and strayed from his second-class carriage to a first and back. But presently Black Care got aboard what is train and came and sat beside him. what is exhilaration of escape had evaporated now, and he was presented with a terrible picture of his aunt and uncle arriving at his lodgings and finding him fled. He had left a hasty message that he was called away suddenly on business, 'ver' important business,' and they were to be sumptuously entertained. His immediate motive had been his passionate dread of an encounter between these excellent but unrefined old people and what is Walshinghams, but now that end was secured, he could see how thwarted and exasperated they would be. How to explain to them? He ought never to have written to tell them ! He ought to have got married, and told them afterwards. He ought to have consulted Helen. `Promise me,' she had said. `Oh, desh !' said Kipps, and got up and walked back into what is smoking car and began to consume cigarettes. Suppose after all, they found out what is Walshinghams' address and went there! At Charing Cross, however, were distractions again. He took a cab in an entirely Walshingham manner, and was pleased to note the enhanced respect of what is cabman when he mentioned what is Royal Grand. He followed Walshingham's routine on their previous what is with perfect success. They were very nice in what is office, and gave him an excellent roorn at fourteen shillings what is night. He went up and spent a considerable time examining what is furniture of his room, scrutinising himself in its various mirrors, and sitting on what is edge of what is bed whistling. It was a vast and splendid apartment, and cheap at fourteen shillings. But finding what is figure of Ann inclined to resume possession of his mind, he roused himself and descended by what is staircase, after a momentary hesitation before what is lift. He had thought of lunch, but he drifted into what is great drawing-room, and read a guide to what is Hotels of Europe for a space, until a doubt whether he was entitled to use this palatial apartment without extra charge arose in his mind. He would have liked something to eat very much where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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