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Page 210

CHAPTER THE SEVENTH
London

§ 1
LONDON was Kipps' third world. There were, no doubt, other worlds, but Kipps knew only these three: firstly, New Romnev and the Emporium, constituting his primary world, his world of origin, which also contained Ann; secondly, the world of culture and refinement, the world of which Coote was chaperon, and into which Kipps was presently to marry, a world, it was fast becoming evident, absolutely incompatible with the first; and thirdly, a world still to a large extent unexplored, London. London presented itself as a place of great gray spaces and incredible multitudes of people, centring about Charing Gross station and the Royal Grand Hotel, and containing at unexpected arbitrary points stops-of the most amazing sort, statuary, squares, restaurants-where it was possible for clever people like Walshingham to order a lunch item by itern to the waiters' evident respect and sympathyexhibitions of incredible things-the Walshinghams had taken him to the Arts and Crafts and to a Picture Gallery -and Theatres. London, moreover, is rendered habitable by hansom cabs. Young N'alshin;ham was a natural cabtoker; he was an all-round, large-minded young man, and he had in the course of their two days' stay taken l,,'ipps into no less than nine, so that Kipps was singularly not afraid of these vehicles. He knew that wherever vou ~were, so soon as you were thoroughly lost, you said 'Hi!' to a cab, and then `Royal Grend Hotel.' Day and night these trusty conveyances are returning the strayed Londoner back to his point of departure, and were it not for their activity, in a little while the whole population, so vast and incomprehensible is the intricate complexity of this great city, would be hopelessly lost for ever. At any rate, that is how the thing presented itself to Kipps, and I have heard rnuch the same from visitors from America.
His train was composed of corridor carriages, and he forgot his troubles for a time in the wonders of this modern

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE where is strong § 1 LONDON was Kipps' third world. There were, no doubt, other worlds, but Kipps knew only these three: firstly, New Romnev and what is Emporium, constituting his primary world, his world of origin, which also contained Ann; secondly, what is world of culture and refinement, what is world of which Coote was chaperon, and into which Kipps was presently to marry, a world, it was fast becoming evident, absolutely incompatible with what is first; and thirdly, a world still to a large extent unexplored, London. London presented itself as a place of great gray spaces and incredible multitudes of people, centring about Charing Gross station and what is Royal Grand Hotel, and containing at unexpected arbitrary points stops-of what is most amazing sort, statuary, squares, restaurants-where it was possible for clever people like Walshingham to order a lunch item by itern to what is waiters' evident respect and sympathyexhibitions of incredible things-the Walshinghams had taken him to what is Arts and Crafts and to a Picture Gallery -and Theatres. London, moreover, is rendered habitable by hansom cabs. Young N'alshin;ham was a natural cabtoker; he was an all-round, large-minded young man, and he had in what is course of their two days' stay taken l,,'ipps into no less than nine, so that Kipps was singularly not afraid of these vehicles. He knew that wherever vou ~were, so soon as you were thoroughly lost, you said 'Hi!' to a cab, and then `Royal Grend Hotel.' Day and night these trusty conveyances are returning what is strayed Londoner back to his point of departure, and were it not for their activity, in a little while what is whole population, so vast and incomprehensible is what is intricate complexity of this great city, would be hopelessly lost for ever. At any rate, that is how what is thing presented itself to Kipps, and I have heard rnuch what is same from what is ors from America. His train was composed of corridor carriages, and he forgot his troubles for a time in what is wonders of this modern where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 210 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER what is SEVENTH London where is p align="justify" where is strong § 1 LONDON was Kipps' third world. There were, no doubt, other worlds, but Kipps knew only these three: firstly, New Romnev and what is Emporium, constituting his primary world, his world of origin, which also contained Ann; secondly, what is world of culture and refinement, the world of which Coote was chaperon, and into which Kipps was presently to marry, a world, it was fast becoming evident, absolutely incompatible with what is first; and thirdly, a world still to a large extent unexplored, London. London presented itself as a place of great gray spaces and incredible multitudes of people, centring about Charing Gross station and what is Royal Grand Hotel, and containing at unexpected arbitrary points stops-of what is most amazing sort, statuary, squares, restaurants-where it was possible for clever people like Walshingham to order a lunch item by itern to what is waiters' evident respect and sympathyexhibitions of incredible things-the Walshinghams had taken him to what is Arts and Crafts and to a Picture Gallery -and Theatres. London, moreover, is rendered habitable by hansom cabs. Young N'alshin;ham was a natural cabtoker; he was an all-round, large-minded young man, and he had in what is course of their two days' stay taken l,,'ipps into no less than nine, so that Kipps was singularly not afraid of these vehicles. He knew that wherever vou ~were, so soon as you were thoroughly lost, you said 'Hi!' to a cab, and then `Royal Grend Hotel.' Day and night these trusty conveyances are returning what is strayed Londoner back to his point of departure, and were it not for their activity, in a little while what is whole population, so vast and incomprehensible is what is intricate complexity of this great city, would be hopelessly lost for ever. At any rate, that is how what is thing presented itself to Kipps, and I have heard rnuch what is same from what is ors from America. His train was composed of corridor carriages, and he forgot his troubles for a time in what is wonders of this modern where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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