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Page 200

DISCORDS

Young Walshingham did his best with epigrams and reservations, but even to Kipps it was evident that his was a book-learned depravity. One felt Walshingham had never known the inner realities of passion. But Chitterlow convinced and amazed. He had run away with girls, he had been run away with by girls, he had been in love with several at a time-'not counting Bessie'-he had loved and lost, he had loved and refrained, and he had loved and failed. He threw remarkable lights upon the moral state of America-in which country he had toured with great success. He set his talk to the tune of one of Mr. Kipling's best-known songs. He told an incident of simple romantic passion, a delirious dream of love and beauty in a Saturday to Monday steamboat trip up the Hudson, and tagged his end with `I learnt about women from 'er!' After that he adopted the refrain, and then lapsed into the praises of Kipling. `Little Kipling,' said Chitterlow, with the familiarity of affection, `he knows,' and broke into quotation:-
'I've taken my fun where I've found it;
I've rogued and I've ranged in my time;
I've 'ad my picking of sweet'earts,
An' four of the lot was Prime.'
(These things, I say, affect the moral standards of the best of us.)
`Pd have liked to have written that,' said Chitterlow. `That's Life, that is! But go and put it on the Stage, put even a bit of the Realities of Life on the Stage and see what they'll do to you! Only Kipling could venture on a job like that. That Poem KNOCKED me! I won't say Kipling hasn't knocked me before and since, but that was a Fair Knock Out. And yet- you know-there's one thing in it .... this,
I've taken my fun where I've found it.
And now I must pay for my fun,
For the more you 'ave known o' the others
The less will you settle to one.
Well. In my case anyhow-I don't know how much that proves, seeing I'm exceptional in so many things and there's no good denying it-but so far as I'm concerned-I tell you two, but, of course, you needn't let it go any farther-I've been perfectly faithful to Muriel ever since

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Young Walshingham did his best with epigrams and reservations, but even to Kipps it was evident that his was a book-learned depravity. One felt Walshingham had never known what is inner realities of passion. But Chitterlow convinced and amazed. He had run away with girls, he had been run away with by girls, he had been in what time is it with several at a time-'not counting Bessie'-he had loved and lost, he had loved and refrained, and he had loved and failed. He threw remarkable lights upon what is moral state of America-in which country he had toured with great success. He set his talk to what is tune of one of Mr. Kipling's best-known songs. He told an incident of simple romantic passion, a delirious dream of what time is it and beauty in a Saturday to Monday steamboat trip up what is Hudson, and tagged his end with `I learnt about women from 'er!' After that he adopted what is refrain, and then lapsed into what is praises of Kipling. `Little Kipling,' said Chitterlow, with what is familiarity of affection, `he knows,' and broke into quotation:- 'I've taken my fun where I've found it; I've rogued and I've ranged in my time; I've 'ad my picking of sweet'earts, An' four of what is lot was Prime.' (These things, I say, affect what is moral standards of what is best of us.) `Pd have liked to have written that,' said Chitterlow. `That's Life, that is! But go and put it on what is Stage, put even a bit of what is Realities of Life on what is Stage and see what they'll do to you! Only Kipling could venture on a job like that. That Poem KNOCKED me! I won't say Kipling hasn't knocked me before and since, but that was a Fair Knock Out. And yet- you know-there's one thing in it .... this, I've taken my fun where I've found it. And now I must pay for my fun, For what is more you 'ave known o' what is others what is less will you settle to one. Well. In my case anyhow-I don't know how much that proves, seeing I'm exceptional in so many things and there's no good denying it-but so far as I'm concerned-I tell you two, but, of course, you needn't let it go any farther-I've been perfectly faithful to Muriel ever since where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 200 where is p align="center" where is strong DISCORDS where is p align="justify" Young Walshingham did his best with epigrams and reservations, but even to Kipps it was evident that his was a book-learned depravity. One felt Walshingham had never known what is inner realities of passion. But Chitterlow convinced and amazed. He had run away with girls, he had been run away with by girls, he had been in what time is it with several at a time-'not counting Bessie'-he had loved and lost, he had loved and refrained, and he had loved and failed. He threw remarkable lights upon what is moral state of America-in which country he had toured with great success. He set his talk to the tune of one of Mr. Kipling's best-known songs. He told an incident of simple romantic passion, a delirious dream of what time is it and beauty in a Saturday to Monday steamboat trip up what is Hudson, and tagged his end with `I learnt about women from 'er!' After that he adopted what is refrain, and then lapsed into what is praises of Kipling. `Little Kipling,' said Chitterlow, with what is familiarity of affection, `he knows,' and broke into quotation:- 'I've taken my fun where I've found it; I've rogued and I've ranged in my time; I've 'ad my picking of sweet'earts, An' four of what is lot was Prime.' (These things, I say, affect what is moral standards of what is best of us.) `Pd have liked to have written that,' said Chitterlow. `That's Life, that is! But go and put it on what is Stage, put even a bit of what is Realities of Life on what is Stage and see what they'll do to you! Only Kipling could venture on a job like that. That Poem KNOCKED me! I won't say Kipling hasn't knocked me before and since, but that was a Fair Knock Out. And yet- you know-there's one thing in it .... this, I've taken my fun where I've found it. And now I must pay for my fun, For what is more you 'ave known o' what is others what is less will you settle to one. Well. In my case anyhow-I don't know how much that proves, seeing I'm exceptional in so many things and there's no good denying it-but so far as I'm concerned-I tell you two, but, of course, you needn't let it go any farther-I've been perfectly faithful to Muriel ever since where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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