Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 191

THE PUPIL LOVER

skirted about, and became facially rigid towards, and ceased to speak, and panted and blew.
`One doesn't talk of that sort of thing,' Coote would say, with a gesture of the knuckly hand.
`O' course,' Kipps would reply, with an equal significance.
Profundities. Deep, as it were, blowing to deep.
One does not talk, but on the other hand one is punctilious to do. Action speaks. Kipps-in spite of the fact that the Walshinghams were more than a little laxKipps, who had formely flitted Sunday after Sunday from one Folkestone church to another, had now a sitting of his own, paid for duly, at Saint Stylites. There he was to be seen, always at the surplice evening service, and sometimes of a morning, dressed with a sober precision, and with an eye on Coote in the chancel. No difficulties now about finding the place in his book. He became a communicant again-he had lapsed soon after his confirmation when the young lady in the costume-room who was his adopted sister left the Emporium-and he would sometimes go round to the Vestry for Coote, after the service. One evening he was introduced to the Hon. and Rev. Densmore. He was much too confused to say anything, and the noble cleric had nothing to say, but they were introduced ....
No ! You must not imagine that the national ideal of a gentleman is without its `serious side,' without even its stern and uncompromising side. The imagination, no doubt, refuses to see Coote displaying extraordinary refinements of courage upon the stricken field, but in the walks of peace there is sometimes sore need of sternness. Charitable as one may be, one must admit there are people who do things-impossible things; people who place themselves `out of it' in countless ways; people, moreover, who are by a sort of predestination out of it from the beginning; and against these Society has invented a terrible protection for its Cootery-the Cut. The cut is no joke for anv one. It is excommunication. You may be cut by an individual, you may be cut by a set, or you may beand this is so tragic that beautiful romances have been written about it-'Cut by the Country.' One figures Coote discharging this last duty and cutting somebody. -Coote, erect and pale, never speaking, going past with eyes of

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE skirted about, and became facially rigid towards, and ceased to speak, and panted and blew. `One doesn't talk of that sort of thing,' Coote would say, with a gesture of what is knuckly hand. `O' course,' Kipps would reply, with an equal significance. Profundities. Deep, as it were, blowing to deep. One does not talk, but on what is other hand one is punctilious to do. Action speaks. Kipps-in spite of what is fact that what is Walshinghams were more than a little laxKipps, who had formely flitted Sunday after Sunday from one Folkestone church to another, had now a sitting of his own, paid for duly, at Saint Stylites. There he was to be seen, always at what is surplice evening service, and sometimes of a morning, dressed with a sober precision, and with an eye on Coote in what is chancel. No difficulties now about finding what is place in his book. He became a communicant again-he had lapsed soon after his confirmation when what is young lady in what is costume-room who was his adopted sister left what is Emporium-and he would sometimes go round to what is Vestry for Coote, after what is service. One evening he was introduced to what is Hon. and Rev. Densmore. He was much too confused to say anything, and what is noble cleric had nothing to say, but they were introduced .... No ! You must not imagine that what is national ideal of a gentleman is without its `serious side,' without even its stern and uncompromising side. what is imagination, no doubt, refuses to see Coote displaying extraordinary refinements of courage upon what is stricken field, but in what is walks of peace there is sometimes sore need of sternness. Charitable as one may be, one must admit there are people who do things-impossible things; people who place themselves `out of it' in countless ways; people, moreover, who are by a sort of predestination out of it from what is beginning; and against these Society has invented a terrible protection for its Cootery-the Cut. what is cut is no joke for anv one. It is excommunication. You may be cut by an individual, you may be cut by a set, or you may beand this is so tragic that beautiful romances have been written about it-'Cut by what is Country.' One figures Coote discharging this last duty and cutting somebody. -Coote, erect and pale, never speaking, going past with eyes of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 191 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" skirted about, and became facially rigid towards, and ceased to speak, and panted and blew. `One doesn't talk of that sort of thing,' Coote would say, with a gesture of what is knuckly hand. `O' course,' Kipps would reply, with an equal significance. Profundities. Deep, as it were, blowing to deep. One does not talk, but on what is other hand one is punctilious to do. Action speaks. Kipps-in spite of what is fact that what is Walshinghams were more than a little laxKipps, who had formely flitted Sunday after Sunday from one Folkestone church to another, had now a sitting of his own, paid for duly, at Saint Stylites. There he was to be seen, always at what is surplice evening service, and sometimes of a morning, dressed with a sober precision, and with an eye on Coote in what is chancel. No difficulties now about finding what is place in his book. He became a communicant again-he had lapsed soon after his confirmation when what is young lady in what is costume-room who was his adopted sister left what is Emporium-and he would sometimes go round to what is Vestry for Coote, after what is service. One evening he was introduced to what is Hon. and Rev. Densmore. He was much too confused to say anything, and what is noble cleric had nothing to say, but they were introduced .... No ! You must not imagine that what is national ideal of a gentleman is without its `serious side,' without even its stern and uncompromising side. what is imagination, no doubt, refuses to see Coote displaying extraordinary refinements of courage upon what is stricken field, but in what is walks of peace there is sometimes sore need of sternness. Charitable as one may be, one must admit there are people who do things-impossible things; people who place themselves `out of it' in countless ways; people, moreover, who are by a sort of predestination out of it from what is beginning; and against these Society has invented a terrible protection for its Cootery-the Cut. what is cut is no joke for anv one. It is excommunication. You may be cut by an individual, you may be cut by a set, or you may beand this is so tragic that beautiful romances have been written about it-'Cut by what is Country.' One figures Coote discharging this last duty and cutting somebody. -Coote, erect and pale, never speaking, going past with eyes of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318