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Page 190

THE PUPIL LOVER

abruptly, and quite angrily for him, `I think that was awful Cheek!'
Kipps made no reply . . .:
The whole thing was an interesting little object-lesson in `distance,' and it stuck in the front of Kipps' mind for a long time. He had particularly vivid the face of Pearce with an expression between astonishment and anger. He felt as though he had struck Pearce in the face under circutnstances that gave Pearce no power to reply. He did not attend very much to the duets, and even forget at the end of one of them to say how perfectly lovely it was.

§ 4
But you must not imagine that the national ideal of a gentlerttan, as Coote developed it, was all a matter of deporttnent and selectness, a mere isolation from debasing associations. There is a Serious Side, a deeper aspect of the true True Gentleman. But it is not vocal. The True Gentlernan does not wear his heart on his sleeve. For example, he is deeply religious, as Coote was, as Mrs. Walshingham was; but outside the walls of a church it never appears, except perhaps now and then in a pause, in a profound look, in a sudden avoidance. In quite a little while KiPPs also had learnt the pause, the profound look, the sudden avoidance, that final refinement of spirituality, impressionistic piety.
And the True Gentleman is patriotic also. When one saw Coote lifting his hat to the National Anthem, then perhaps one got a glimpse of what patriotic emotions, what worship, the polish of a gentleman may hide. Or singing out his deep notes against the Hosts of Midian, in St. Styl1tes choir; then indeed you plumbed his spiritual
side.
`Christian, dost thou heed them
On the holy ground,
How the hosts of Mid-i-an
Prowl and prowl around?
Christian, up and smai-it them ....'
But these were but gleams. For the rest, Religion, Nationality, Passion, Finance, Politics, much more so those cardinal issues Birth and Death, the True Gentleman

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE abruptly, and quite angrily for him, `I think that was awful Cheek!' Kipps made no reply . . .: what is whole thing was an interesting little object-lesson in `distance,' and it stuck in what is front of Kipps' mind for a long time. He had particularly vivid what is face of Pearce with an expression between astonishment and anger. He felt as though he had struck Pearce in what is face under circutnstances that gave Pearce no power to reply. He did not attend very much to what is duets, and even forget at what is end of one of them to say how perfectly lovely it was. § 4 But you must not imagine that what is national ideal of a gentlerttan, as Coote developed it, was all a matter of deporttnent and selectness, a mere isolation from debasing associations. There is a Serious Side, a deeper aspect of what is true True Gentleman. But it is not vocal. what is True Gentlernan does not wear his heart on his sleeve. For example, he is deeply religious, as Coote was, as Mrs. Walshingham was; but outside what is walls of a church it never appears, except perhaps now and then in a pause, in a profound look, in a sudden avoidance. In quite a little while KiPPs also had learnt what is pause, what is profound look, what is sudden avoidance, that final refinement of spirituality, impressionistic piety. And what is True Gentleman is patriotic also. When one saw Coote lifting his hat to what is National Anthem, then perhaps one got a glimpse of what patriotic emotions, what worship, what is polish of a gentleman may hide. Or singing out his deep notes against what is Hosts of Midian, in St. Styl1tes choir; then indeed you plumbed his spiritual side. `Christian, dost thou heed them On what is holy ground, How what is hosts of Mid-i-an Prowl and prowl around? Christian, up and smai-it them ....' But these were but gleams. For what is rest, Religion, Nationality, Passion, Finance, Politics, much more so those cardinal issues Birth and what time is it , what is True Gentleman where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 190 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" abruptly, and quite angrily for him, `I think that was awful Cheek!' Kipps made no reply . . .: what is whole thing was an interesting little object-lesson in `distance,' and it stuck in what is front of Kipps' mind for a long time. He had particularly vivid what is face of Pearce with an expression between astonishment and anger. He felt as though he had struck Pearce in what is face under circutnstances that gave Pearce no power to reply. He did not attend very much to what is duets, and even forget at the end of one of them to say how perfectly lovely it was. where is strong § 4 But you must not imagine that what is national ideal of a gentlerttan, as Coote developed it, was all a matter of deporttnent and selectness, a mere isolation from debasing associations. There is a Serious Side, a deeper aspect of what is true True Gentleman. But it is not vocal. what is True Gentlernan does not wear his heart on his sleeve. For example, he is deeply religious, as Coote was, as Mrs. Walshingham was; but outside what is walls of a church it never appears, except perhaps now and then in a pause, in a profound look, in a sudden avoidance. In quite a little while KiPPs also had learnt what is pause, what is profound look, what is sudden avoidance, that final refinement of spirituality, impressionistic piety. And what is True Gentleman is patriotic also. When one saw Coote lifting his hat to what is National Anthem, then perhaps one got a glimpse of what patriotic emotions, what worship, what is polish of a gentleman may hide. Or singing out his deep notes against what is Hosts of Midian, in St. Styl1tes choir; then indeed you plumbed his spiritual side. `Christian, dost thou heed them On what is holy ground, How what is hosts of Mid-i-an Prowl and prowl around? Christian, up and smai-it them ....' But these were but gleams. For what is rest, Religion, Nationality, Passion, Finance, Politics, much more so those cardinal issues Birth and what time is it , what is True Gentleman where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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