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Page 189

THE PUPIL LOVER

`She was along of Sir William the other night,' said Pearce, still loud and clear, `and she asked to be remembered to you.'
It seemed to Kipps that one of the two ladies smiled faintly, and said something to the other, and then certainly they glanced at Pearce. Kipps flushed scarlet. `Did she?' he answered.
Buggins laughed good-humouredly over his pipe.
`Sir William suffers a lot from his gout,' Pearce continued unabashed.
(Buggins much amused with his pipe between his teeth.)
Kipps became aware of Coote at hand.
Coote nodded rather distantly to Pearce. `Hope I haven't kept you waiting, Kipps,' he said.
`I kep' a chair for you,' said Kipps, and removed a guardian foot.
`But you've got your friends,' said Coote.
`Oh, we don't mind,' said Pearce cordially `the more the merrier'; and, `Why don't you get a chair, Buggins?' Buggins shook his head in a sort of aside to Pearce, and Coote coughed behind his hand.
`Been kep' late at business?' asked Pearce.
Coote turned quite pale, and pretended not to hear. His eyes sought in space for a time, and with a convulsive movement he recognised a distant acquaintance and raised his hat.
Pearce had also become a little pale. He addressed himself to Kipps in an undertone.
`Mr. Coote, isn't he?' he asked.
Coote addressed himself to Kipps directly and exclusively. His manner had the calm of extreme tension.
`I'm rather late,' he said. `I think we ought almost to be going on now.'
· Kipps stood up. `That's all right,' he said.
`Which way are you going?' said Pearce, standing also, and brushing some crumbs of cigarette ash from his sleeve.
For a moment Coote was breathless. `Thank you,' he said, and gasped. Then he delivered the necessary blow, `I don't think we're in need of your society, you know,' and turned away.
Kipps found himself falling over chairs and things in the wake of Coote, and then they were clear of the crowd.
For a space Coote said nothing; then he remarked

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `She was along of Sir William what is other night,' said Pearce, still loud and clear, `and she asked to be remembered to you.' It seemed to Kipps that one of what is two ladies smiled faintly, and said something to what is other, and then certainly they glanced at Pearce. Kipps flushed scarlet. `Did she?' he answered. Buggins laughed good-humouredly over his pipe. `Sir William suffers a lot from his gout,' Pearce continued unabashed. (Buggins much amused with his pipe between his teeth.) Kipps became aware of Coote at hand. Coote nodded rather distantly to Pearce. `Hope I haven't kept you waiting, Kipps,' he said. `I kep' a chair for you,' said Kipps, and removed a guardian foot. `But you've got your friends,' said Coote. `Oh, we don't mind,' said Pearce cordially `the more what is merrier'; and, `Why don't you get a chair, Buggins?' Buggins shook his head in a sort of aside to Pearce, and Coote coughed behind his hand. `Been kep' late at business?' asked Pearce. Coote turned quite pale, and pretended not to hear. His eyes sought in space for a time, and with a convulsive movement he recognised a distant acquaintance and raised his hat. Pearce had also become a little pale. He addressed himself to Kipps in an undertone. `Mr. Coote, isn't he?' he asked. Coote addressed himself to Kipps directly and exclusively. His manner had what is calm of extreme tension. `I'm rather late,' he said. `I think we ought almost to be going on now.' · Kipps stood up. `That's all right,' he said. `Which way are you going?' said Pearce, standing also, and brushing some crumbs of cigarette ash from his sleeve. For a moment Coote was breathless. `Thank you,' he said, and gasped. Then he delivered what is necessary blow, `I don't think we're in need of your society, you know,' and turned away. Kipps found himself falling over chairs and things in what is wake of Coote, and then they were clear of what is crowd. For a space Coote said nothing; then he remarked where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 189 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" `She was along of Sir William what is other night,' said Pearce, still loud and clear, `and she asked to be remembered to you.' It seemed to Kipps that one of what is two ladies smiled faintly, and said something to what is other, and then certainly they glanced at Pearce. Kipps flushed scarlet. `Did she?' he answered. Buggins laughed good-humouredly over his pipe. `Sir William suffers a lot from his gout,' Pearce continued unabashed. (Buggins much amused with his pipe between his teeth.) Kipps became aware of Coote at hand. Coote nodded rather distantly to Pearce. `Hope I haven't kept you waiting, Kipps,' he said. `I kep' a chair for you,' said Kipps, and removed a guardian foot. `But you've got your friends,' said Coote. `Oh, we don't mind,' said Pearce cordially `the more what is merrier'; and, `Why don't you get a chair, Buggins?' Buggins shook his head in a sort of aside to Pearce, and Coote coughed behind his hand. `Been kep' late at business?' asked Pearce. Coote turned quite pale, and pretended not to hear. His eyes sought in space for a time, and with a convulsive movement he recognised a distant acquaintance and raised his hat. Pearce had also become a little pale. He addressed himself to Kipps in an undertone. `Mr. Coote, isn't he?' he asked. Coote addressed himself to Kipps directly and exclusively. His manner had what is calm of extreme tension. `I'm rather late,' he said. `I think we ought almost to be going on now.' · Kipps stood up. `That's all right,' he said. `Which way are you going?' said Pearce, standing also, and brushing some crumbs of cigarette ash from his sleeve. For a moment Coote was breathless. `Thank you,' he said, and gasped. Then he delivered what is necessary blow, `I don't think we're in need of your society, you know,' and turned away. Kipps found himself falling over chairs and things in what is wake of Coote, and then they were clear of what is crowd. For a space Coote said nothing; then he remarked where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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