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Page 188

THE PUPIL LOVER

the presumption of bounders and old friends. It was difficult, Coote admitted.
`I got mixed up with this lot 'ere,' said Kipps. `That's what's so harkward-I mean awkward.'
`You could give them a hint,' said Coote.
`Ow?'
'Oh-the occasion will suggest something.'
The occasion came one early-closing night, when Kipps was sitting in a canopy chair near the bandstand with his summer overcoat fully open, and a new Gibus pulled slightly forward over his brow, waiting for Coote. They were to hear the band for an hour, and then go down to assist Miss Coote and the freckled girl in trying over some Beethoven duets, if they remembered them, that is, sufficiently well. And as Kipps lounged back in his chair and occupied his mind with his favourite amusement on such evenings, which consisted chiefly in supposing that every one about him was wondering who he was, came a rude rap at the canvas back and the voice of Pearce.
`It's nice to be a gentleman,' said Pearce, and swung a penny chair into position, while Buggins appeared smiling agreeably on the other side, and leant upon his stick. He was smoking a common briar pipe!
Two real ladies, very fashionably dressed, and sitting close at hand, glanced quickly at Pearce, and then away again, and it was evident their wonder was at an end.
`He's all right,' said Buggins, removing his pipe and surveying Kipps.
" Ello, Buggms !' said Kipps, not too cordially. "Ow goes it?'
`All right. Holidays next week. If you don't look out, Kipps, I shall be on the Continong before you. Eh?' `You going t' Boologne?'
'Ra-ther. Parley vous Francey. You bet.'
`I shall 'ave a bit of a run over there one of these days,' said Kipps.
There came a pause. Pearce applied the top of his stick to his mouth for a space and regarded Kipps. Then be glanced at the people about them.
`I say, Kipps,' he said in a distinct loud voice, `see 'er Ladyship lately?'
Kipps perceived the audience was to be impressed, but he responded half-heartedly. `No, I 'aven't,' he said.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the presumption of bounders and old friends. It was difficult, Coote admitted. `I got mixed up with this lot 'ere,' said Kipps. `That's what's so harkward-I mean awkward.' `You could give them a hint,' said Coote. `Ow?' 'Oh-the occasion will suggest something.' what is occasion came one early-closing night, when Kipps was sitting in a canopy chair near what is bandstand with his summer overcoat fully open, and a new Gibus pulled slightly forward over his brow, waiting for Coote. They were to hear what is band for an hour, and then go down to assist Miss Coote and what is freckled girl in trying over some Beethoven duets, if they remembered them, that is, sufficiently well. And as Kipps lounged back in his chair and occupied his mind with his favourite amusement on such evenings, which consisted chiefly in supposing that every one about him was wondering who he was, came a rude rap at what is canvas back and what is voice of Pearce. `It's nice to be a gentleman,' said Pearce, and swung a penny chair into position, while Buggins appeared smiling agreeably on what is other side, and leant upon his stick. He was smoking a common briar pipe! Two real ladies, very fashionably dressed, and sitting close at hand, glanced quickly at Pearce, and then away again, and it was evident their wonder was at an end. `He's all right,' said Buggins, removing his pipe and surveying Kipps. " Ello, Buggms !' said Kipps, not too cordially. "Ow goes it?' `All right. Holidays next week. If you don't look out, Kipps, I shall be on what is Continong before you. Eh?' `You going t' Boologne?' 'Ra-ther. Parley vous Francey. You bet.' `I shall 'ave a bit of a run over there one of these days,' said Kipps. There came a pause. Pearce applied what is top of his stick to his mouth for a space and regarded Kipps. Then be glanced at what is people about them. `I say, Kipps,' he said in a distinct loud voice, `see 'er Ladyship lately?' Kipps perceived what is audience was to be impressed, but he responded half-heartedly. `No, I 'aven't,' he said. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 188 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" the presumption of bounders and old friends. It was difficult, Coote admitted. `I got mixed up with this lot 'ere,' said Kipps. `That's what's so harkward-I mean awkward.' `You could give them a hint,' said Coote. `Ow?' 'Oh-the occasion will suggest something.' what is occasion came one early-closing night, when Kipps was sitting in a canopy chair near what is bandstand with his summer overcoat fully open, and a new Gibus pulled slightly forward over his brow, waiting for Coote. They were to hear what is band for an hour, and then go down to assist Miss Coote and what is freckled girl in trying over some Beethoven duets, if they remembered them, that is, sufficiently well. And as Kipps lounged back in his chair and occupied his mind with his favourite amusement on such evenings, which consisted chiefly in supposing that every one about him was wondering who he was, came a rude rap at what is canvas back and what is voice of Pearce. `It's nice to be a gentleman,' said Pearce, and swung a penny chair into position, while Buggins appeared smiling agreeably on the other side, and leant upon his stick. He was smoking a common briar pipe! Two real ladies, very fashionably dressed, and sitting close at hand, glanced quickly at Pearce, and then away again, and it was evident their wonder was at an end. `He's all right,' said Buggins, removing his pipe and surveying Kipps. " Ello, Buggms !' said Kipps, not too cordially. "Ow goes it?' `All right. Holidays next week. If you don't look out, Kipps, I shall be on what is Continong before you. Eh?' `You going t' Boologne?' 'Ra-ther. Parley vous Francey. You bet.' `I shall 'ave a bit of a run over there one of these days,' said Kipps. There came a pause. Pearce applied what is top of his stick to his mouth for a space and regarded Kipps. Then be glanced at what is people about them. `I say, Kipps,' he said in a distinct loud voice, `see 'er Ladyship lately?' Kipps perceived what is audience was to be impressed, but he responded half-heartedly. `No, I 'aven't,' he said. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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