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Page 187

THE PUPIL LOVER

doubt about Kipps' own position was removed, and he stood with Coote inside the sphere of gentlemen assured. Within the sphere of gentlemen there are distinctions of rank indeed, but none of class; there are the Big People, and the modest, refined, gentlemanly little people, like Coote, who may even dabble in the professions and coun terless trades; there are lords and magnificences, and there
are gentle-folk who have to manage-but they can all call on one another, they preserve a general quality of deportment throughout, they constitute that great state within the state-Society.
`But reely,' said the Pupil, `not what you call being in Society?'
`Yes,' said Coote. `Of course, down here, one doesn't see much of it, but there's local society. It has the same rules.'
`Calling and all that?'
`Precisely,' said Coote.
Kipps thought, whistled a bar, and suddenly broached a question of conscience. `I often wonder,' he said,'whether I oughtn't to dress for dinner-when I'm alone 'ere.'
Coote protruded his lips and reflected. `Not full dress,' he adjudicated; `that would be a little excessive. But you should change, you know. Put on a mess jacket, and that sort of thing-easy dress. That is what I should do, certainly, if I wasn't in harness--and poor.'
He coughed modestly, and patted his hair behind.
And after that the washing-bill of Kipps quadrupled, and he was to be seen at times by the bandstand with his light summer overcoat unbuttoned, to give a glimpse of his nice white tie. He and Coote would be smoking the gold-tipped cigarettes young Walshingham had prescribed as `chic,' and appreciating the music highly. 'That'spuff-a very nice bit,' Kipps would say; or better, `That's nace.' And at the first grunts of the loyal anthem they stood with religiously uplifted hats. Whatever else you might call them, you could never call them disloyal.
The boundary of Society was admittedly very close to Coote and Kipps, and a leading solicitude of the true gentleman was to detect clearly those `beneath' him, and to behave towards them in a proper spirit. `It's jest there it's so 'ard for me.' said Kipps. He had to cultivate a certain `distance,' to acquire altogether the art of checking

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE doubt about Kipps' own position was removed, and he stood with Coote inside what is sphere of gentlemen assured. Within what is sphere of gentlemen there are distinctions of rank indeed, but none of class; there are what is Big People, and what is modest, refined, gentlemanly little people, like Coote, who may even dabble in what is professions and coun terless trades; there are lords and magnificences, and there are gentle-folk who have to manage-but they can all call on one another, they preserve a general quality of deportment throughout, they constitute that great state within what is state-Society. `But reely,' said what is Pupil, `not what you call being in Society?' `Yes,' said Coote. `Of course, down here, one doesn't see much of it, but there's local society. It has what is same rules.' `Calling and all that?' `Precisely,' said Coote. Kipps thought, whistled a bar, and suddenly broached a question of conscience. `I often wonder,' he said,'whether I oughtn't to dress for dinner-when I'm alone 'ere.' Coote protruded his lips and reflected. `Not full dress,' he adjudicated; `that would be a little excessive. But you should change, you know. Put on a mess jacket, and that sort of thing-easy dress. That is what I should do, certainly, if I wasn't in harness--and poor.' He coughed modestly, and patted his hair behind. And after that what is washing-bill of Kipps quadrupled, and he was to be seen at times by what is bandstand with his light summer overcoat unbuttoned, to give a glimpse of his nice white tie. He and Coote would be smoking what is gold-tipped cigarettes young Walshingham had prescribed as `chic,' and appreciating what is music highly. 'That'spuff-a very nice bit,' Kipps would say; or better, `That's nace.' And at what is first grunts of what is loyal anthem they stood with religiously uplifted hats. Whatever else you might call them, you could never call them disloyal. what is boundary of Society was admittedly very close to Coote and Kipps, and a leading solicitude of what is true gentleman was to detect clearly those `beneath' him, and to behave towards them in a proper spirit. `It's jest there it's so 'ard for me.' said Kipps. He had to cultivate a certain `distance,' to acquire altogether what is art of checking where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 187 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" doubt about Kipps' own position was removed, and he stood with Coote inside what is sphere of gentlemen assured. Within what is sphere of gentlemen there are distinctions of rank indeed, but none of class; there are what is Big People, and what is modest, refined, gentlemanly little people, like Coote, who may even dabble in what is professions and coun terless trades; there are lords and magnificences, and there are gentle-folk who have to manage-but they can all call on one another, they preserve a general quality of deportment throughout, they constitute that great state within what is state-Society. `But reely,' said what is Pupil, `not what you call being in Society?' `Yes,' said Coote. `Of course, down here, one doesn't see much of it, but there's local society. It has what is same rules.' `Calling and all that?' `Precisely,' said Coote. Kipps thought, whistled a bar, and suddenly broached a question of conscience. `I often wonder,' he said,'whether I oughtn't to dress for dinner-when I'm alone 'ere.' Coote protruded his lips and reflected. `Not full dress,' he adjudicated; `that would be a little excessive. But you should change, you know. Put on a mess jacket, and that sort of thing-easy dress. That is what I should do, certainly, if I wasn't in harness--and poor.' He coughed modestly, and patted his hair behind. And after that what is washing-bill of Kipps quadrupled, and he was to be seen at times by what is bandstand with his light summer overcoat unbuttoned, to give a glimpse of his nice white tie. He and Coote would be smoking what is gold-tipped cigarettes young Walshingham had prescribed as `chic,' and appreciating what is music highly. 'That'spuff-a very nice bit,' Kipps would say; or better, `That's nace.' And at what is first grunts of what is loyal anthem they stood with religiously uplifted hats. Whatever else you might call them, you could never call them disloyal. what is boundary of Society was admittedly very close to Coote and Kipps, and a leading solicitude of what is true gentleman was to detect clearly those `beneath' him, and to behave towards them in a proper spirit. `It's jest there it's so 'ard for me.' said Kipps. He had to cultivate a certain `distance,' to acquire altogether what is art of checking where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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