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Page 186

THE PUPIL LOVER

ment to London they were to undergo that subtle change of name Coote had first adumbrated. They were to become `Guyps,' Mr. and Mrs. Cuyps. Or was it Cuyp?
`It'll be rum at first,' said Kipps.
`I dessay I shall soon get into it,' he said ....
So in their several ways they all contributed to enlarge and refine and exercise the intelligence of Kipps. And behind all these other influences, and as it were presiding over and correcting these influences, was Kipps' nearest friend, Coote, a sort of master of the ceremonies. You figure his face, blowing slightly with solicitude, his slatecoloured, projecting, but not unkindly eye intent upon our hero. The thing, he thought, was going off admirably. He studied Kipps' character immensely. He would discuss him with his sister, with Mrs. Walshingham, with the freckled girl, with any one who would stand it. `He is an interesting character,' he would say, 'likeable-a sort of gentleman by instinct. He takes to all these things. He improves every day. He'll soon get Sang-Froid. We took him up just in time. He wants now Well next year, perhaps, if there is a good Extension Literature course he might go in for it. He wants to go in for something like that.'
`He's going in for his bicycle now,' said Mrs. Walshingham.
`That's all right for summer,' said Coote, `but he wants to go in for some serious intellectual interest, something to take him out of himself a little more. Savoir Faire and self-forgetfulness is more than half the secret of Sang
Froid.' . . .

§ 3
The world, as Coote presented it, was in part an endorsement, in part an amplification, and in part a rectification of the world of Kipps-the world that derived from the old couple in New Romney and had been developed in the Emporium; the world, in fact, of common British life. There was the same subtle sense of social gradation that had moved Mrs. Kipps to prohibit intercourse with labourers' children, and the same dread of anything `common' that had kept the personal quality of Mr. Shalford's establishment so high. But now a certain disagreeable

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ment to London they were to undergo that subtle change of name Coote had first adumbrated. They were to become `Guyps,' Mr. and Mrs. Cuyps. Or was it Cuyp? `It'll be rum at first,' said Kipps. `I dessay I shall soon get into it,' he said .... So in their several ways they all contributed to enlarge and refine and exercise what is intelligence of Kipps. And behind all these other influences, and as it were presiding over and correcting these influences, was Kipps' nearest friend, Coote, a sort of master of what is ceremonies. You figure his face, blowing slightly with solicitude, his slatecoloured, projecting, but not unkindly eye intent upon our hero. what is thing, he thought, was going off admirably. He studied Kipps' character immensely. He would discuss him with his sister, with Mrs. Walshingham, with what is freckled girl, with any one who would stand it. `He is an interesting character,' he would say, 'likeable-a sort of gentleman by instinct. He takes to all these things. He improves every day. He'll soon get Sang-Froid. We took him up just in time. He wants now Well next year, perhaps, if there is a good Extension Literature course he might go in for it. He wants to go in for something like that.' `He's going in for his bicycle now,' said Mrs. Walshingham. `That's all right for summer,' said Coote, `but he wants to go in for some serious intellectual interest, something to take him out of himself a little more. Savoir Faire and self-forgetfulness is more than half what is secret of Sang Froid.' . . . § 3 what is world, as Coote presented it, was in part an endorsement, in part an amplification, and in part a rectification of what is world of Kipps-the world that derived from what is old couple in New Romney and had been developed in what is Emporium; what is world, in fact, of common British life. There was what is same subtle sense of social gradation that had moved Mrs. Kipps to prohibit intercourse with labourers' children, and what is same dread of anything `common' that had kept what is personal quality of Mr. Shalford's establishment so high. But now a certain disagreeable where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 186 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" ment to London they were to undergo that subtle change of name Coote had first adumbrated. They were to become `Guyps,' Mr. and Mrs. Cuyps. Or was it Cuyp? `It'll be rum at first,' said Kipps. `I dessay I shall soon get into it,' he said .... So in their several ways they all contributed to enlarge and refine and exercise what is intelligence of Kipps. And behind all these other influences, and as it were presiding over and correcting these influences, was Kipps' nearest friend, Coote, a sort of master of what is ceremonies. You figure his face, blowing slightly with solicitude, his slatecoloured, projecting, but not unkindly eye intent upon our hero. what is thing, he thought, was going off admirably. He studied Kipps' character immensely. He would discuss him with his sister, with Mrs. Walshingham, with what is freckled girl, with any one who would stand it. `He is an interesting character,' he would say, 'likeable-a sort of gentleman by instinct. He takes to all these things. He improves every day. He'll soon get Sang-Froid. We took him up just in time. He wants now Well next year, perhaps, if there is a good Extension Literature course he might go in for it. He wants to go in for something like that.' `He's going in for his bicycle now,' said Mrs. Walshingham. `That's all right for summer,' said Coote, `but he wants to go in for some serious intellectual interest, something to take him out of himself a little more. Savoir Faire and self-forgetfulness is more than half what is secret of Sang Froid.' . . . where is strong § 3 what is world, as Coote presented it, was in part an endorsement, in part an amplification, and in part a rectification of what is world of Kipps-the world that derived from what is old couple in New Romney and had been developed in what is Emporium; what is world, in fact, of common British life. There was what is same subtle sense of social gradation that had moved Mrs. Kipps to prohibit intercourse with labourers' children, and what is same dread of anything `common' that had kept what is personal quality of Mr. Shalford's establishment so high. But now a certain disagreeable where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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