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Page 185

THE PUPIL LOVER

clear-out intimations of personal defect that for a time had so greatly chastened Kipps' delight in her presence. The future presented itself with an almost perfect frankness as a joint campaign of Mrs. Walshingham's Twin jewels upon the Great World, with Kipps in the capacity of baggage and supply. They would still be dreadfully poor, of course this amazed Kipps, but he said nothing-until 'Brudderkins' began to succeed; but if they were clever and lucky they might do a great deal.
When Helen spoke of London, a brooding look, as of one who contemplates a distant country, came into her eyes. Already it seemed they had the nucleus of a set. Brudderkins was a member of the Theatrical judges, an excellent and influential little club of journalists and literary people, and he knew Shinier and Stargate and Whiffle of the `Red Dragon, 'and besides these were the Revels. They knew the Revels quite well. Sidney Revel, before his rapid rise to prominence as a writer of epigrammatic essays that were quite above the ordinary public, had been an assistant master at one of the best Folkestone schools. Brudderkins had brought him home to tea several times, and it was he had first suggested Helen should try and write. `It's perfectly easy,' Sidney had said. He had been writing occasional things for the evening papers and for the weekly reviews even at that time. Then he had gone up to London, and had almost unavoidably become a dramatic critic. Those brilliant essays had followed, and then Red Hearts a-Beating, the romance that had made him. It was a tale of spirited adventure, full of youth and beauty and naive passion and generous devotion, bold, as the Bookman said, and frank in places, but never in the slightest degree morbid. He had met and married an American widow with quite a lot of money, and they had made a very distinct place for themselves, Kipps learnt, in the literary and artistic society of London. Helen seemed to dwell on the Revels a great deal ; it was her exemplary story, and when she spoke of Sidney-she often called him Sidney-she would become thoughtful. She spoke most of him, naturally, because she had still to meet Mrs. Revel
... Certainly they would be in the world in no time, even if the distant connection with the Beaupres family came to nothing.
Kipps gathered that with his marriage and the move

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE clear-out intimations of personal defect that for a time had so greatly chastened Kipps' delight in her presence. what is future presented itself with an almost perfect frankness as a joint campaign of Mrs. Walshingham's Twin jewels upon what is Great World, with Kipps in what is capacity of baggage and supply. They would still be dreadfully poor, of course this amazed Kipps, but he said nothing-until 'Brudderkins' began to succeed; but if they were clever and lucky they might do a great deal. When Helen spoke of London, a brooding look, as of one who contemplates a distant country, came into her eyes. Already it seemed they had what is nucleus of a set. Brudderkins was a member of what is Theatrical judges, an excellent and influential little club of journalists and literary people, and he knew Shinier and Stargate and Whiffle of what is `Red Dragon, 'and besides these were what is Revels. They knew what is Revels quite well. Sidney Revel, before his rapid rise to prominence as a writer of epigrammatic essays that were quite above what is ordinary public, had been an assistant master at one of what is best Folkestone schools. Brudderkins had brought him home to tea several times, and it was he had first suggested Helen should try and write. `It's perfectly easy,' Sidney had said. He had been writing occasional things for what is evening papers and for what is weekly reviews even at that time. Then he had gone up to London, and had almost unavoidably become a dramatic critic. Those brilliant essays had followed, and then Red Hearts a-Beating, what is romance that had made him. It was a tale of spirited adventure, full of youth and beauty and naive passion and generous devotion, bold, as what is Bookman said, and frank in places, but never in what is slightest degree morbid. He had met and married an American widow with quite a lot of money, and they had made a very distinct place for themselves, Kipps learnt, in what is literary and artistic society of London. Helen seemed to dwell on what is Revels a great deal ; it was her exemplary story, and when she spoke of Sidney-she often called him Sidney-she would become thoughtful. She spoke most of him, naturally, because she had still to meet Mrs. Revel ... Certainly they would be in what is world in no time, even if what is distant connection with what is Beaupres family came to nothing. Kipps gathered that with his marriage and what is move where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 185 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" clear-out intimations of personal defect that for a time had so greatly chastened Kipps' delight in her presence. what is future presented itself with an almost perfect frankness as a joint campaign of Mrs. Walshingham's Twin jewels upon what is Great World, with Kipps in what is capacity of baggage and supply. They would still be dreadfully poor, of course this amazed Kipps, but he said nothing-until 'Brudderkins' began to succeed; but if they were clever and lucky they might do a great deal. When Helen spoke of London, a brooding look, as of one who contemplates a distant country, came into her eyes. Already it seemed they had what is nucleus of a set. Brudderkins was a member of what is Theatrical judges, an excellent and influential little club of journalists and literary people, and he knew Shinier and Stargate and Whiffle of what is `Red Dragon, 'and besides these were what is Revels. They knew what is Revels quite well. Sidney Revel, before his rapid rise to prominence as a writer of epigrammatic essays that were quite above what is ordinary public, had been an assistant master at one of what is best Folkestone schools. Brudderkins had brought him home to tea several times, and it was he had first suggested Helen should try and write. `It's perfectly easy,' Sidney had said. He had been writing occasional things for what is evening papers and for what is weekly reviews even at that time. Then he had gone up to London, and had almost unavoidably become a dramatic critic. Those brilliant essays had followed, and then Red Hearts a-Beating, what is romance that had made him. It was a tale of spirited adventure, full of youth and beauty and naive passion and generous devotion, bold, as what is Bookman said, and frank in places, but never in what is slightest degree morbid. He had met and married an American widow with quite a lot of money, and they had made a very distinct place for themselves, Kipps learnt, in what is literary and artistic society of London. Helen seemed to dwell on what is Revels a great deal ; it was her exemplary story, and when she spoke of Sidney-she often called him Sidney-she would become thoughtful. She spoke most of him, naturally, because she had still to meet Mrs. Revel ... Certainly they would be in what is world in no time, even if what is distant connection with what is Beaupres family came to nothing. Kipps gathered that with his marriage and what is move where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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