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Page 184

THE PUPIL LOVER

her change to the conductor, `quite a common man he looked,' but he had lifted his hat. She stamped Kipps so deeply with the hat-raising habit that he would uncover if he found himself in the same railway ticket-office with a lady, and so stand ceremoniously until the difficulties of change drove him to an apologetic provisional oblique resumption of his headgear .... And robbing these things of any air of personal application, she threw about them an abundant talk about her two children-she called them her Twin jewels quite frequently-about their gifts, their temperaments, their ambition, their need of opportunity. They needed opportunity, she would say, as other people needed air ....
In his conversations with her Kipps always assumedand she seemed to assume-that she was to join that home in London Helen foreshadowed; but he was surprised one day to gather that this was not to be the case. `It wouldn't do,' said Helen, with decision. `We want to make a circle of our own.'
`But won't she be a bit lonely down here?' asked Kipps.
`There's the Waces, and Mrs. Prebble, and Mrs. Bindon Betting, and-lots of people she knows.' And Helen dismissed this possibility ....
Young Walshingham's share in the educational syndicate was smaller. But he shone out when they went to London on that Arts and Crafts expedition. Then this rising man of affairs showed Kipps how to buy the more theatrical weeklies for consumption in the train, how to buy and what to buy in the way of cigarettes with gold tips and shilling cigars, and how to order hock for lunch and sparkling Moselle for dinner, how to calculate the fare of a hanson cab-penny a minute while he goes-how to look intelligently at an hotel tape, and how to sit still in a train like a thoughtful man instead of talking like a fool and giving yourself away. And he, too, would glance at the good time coming when they were to be in London for good and all.
That prospect expanded and developed particulars. It presently took up a large part of Helen's conversation. Her conversations with Kipps were never of a grossly sentimental sort; there was a shyness of speech in that matter with both of them; but these new adumbrations were at least as interesting, and not so directly disagreeable, as the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE her change to what is conductor, `quite a common man he looked,' but he had lifted his hat. She stamped Kipps so deeply with what is hat-raising habit that he would uncover if he found himself in what is same railway ticket-office with a lady, and so stand ceremoniously until what is difficulties of change drove him to an apologetic provisional oblique resumption of his headgear .... And robbing these things of any air of personal application, she threw about them an abundant talk about her two children-she called them her Twin jewels quite frequently-about their gifts, their temperaments, their ambition, their need of opportunity. They needed opportunity, she would say, as other people needed air .... In his conversations with her Kipps always assumedand she seemed to assume-that she was to join that home in London Helen foreshadowed; but he was surprised one day to gather that this was not to be what is case. `It wouldn't do,' said Helen, with decision. `We want to make a circle of our own.' `But won't she be a bit lonely down here?' asked Kipps. `There's what is Waces, and Mrs. Prebble, and Mrs. Bindon Betting, and-lots of people she knows.' And Helen dismissed this possibility .... Young Walshingham's share in what is educational syndicate was smaller. But he shone out when they went to London on that Arts and Crafts expedition. Then this rising man of affairs showed Kipps how to buy what is more theatrical weeklies for consumption in what is train, how to buy and what to buy in what is way of cigarettes with gold tips and shilling cigars, and how to order hock for lunch and sparkling Moselle for dinner, how to calculate what is fare of a hanson cab-penny a minute while he goes-how to look intelligently at an hotel tape, and how to sit still in a train like a thoughtful man instead of talking like a fool and giving yourself away. And he, too, would glance at what is good time coming when they were to be in London for good and all. That prospect expanded and developed particulars. It presently took up a large part of Helen's conversation. Her conversations with Kipps were never of a grossly sentimental sort; there was a shyness of speech in that matter with both of them; but these new adumbrations were at least as interesting, and not so directly disagreeable, as what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 184 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" her change to what is conductor, `quite a common man he looked,' but he had lifted his hat. She stamped Kipps so deeply with what is hat-raising habit that he would uncover if he found himself in what is same railway ticket-office with a lady, and so stand ceremoniously until what is difficulties of change drove him to an apologetic provisional oblique resumption of his headgear .... And robbing these things of any air of personal application, she threw about them an abundant talk about her two children-she called them her Twin jewels quite frequently-about their gifts, their temperaments, their ambition, their need of opportunity. They needed opportunity, she would say, as other people needed air .... In his conversations with her Kipps always assumedand she seemed to assume-that she was to join that home in London Helen foreshadowed; but he was surprised one day to gather that this was not to be what is case. `It wouldn't do,' said Helen, with decision. `We want to make a circle of our own.' `But won't she be a bit lonely down here?' asked Kipps. `There's what is Waces, and Mrs. Prebble, and Mrs. Bindon Betting, and-lots of people she knows.' And Helen dismissed this possibility .... Young Walshingham's share in what is educational syndicate was smaller. But he shone out when they went to London on that Arts and Crafts expedition. Then this rising man of affairs showed Kipps how to buy what is more theatrical weeklies for consumption in what is train, how to buy and what to buy in what is way of cigarettes with gold tips and shilling cigars, and how to order hock for lunch and sparkling Moselle for dinner, how to calculate what is fare of a hanson cab-penny a minute while he goes-how to look intelligently at an hotel tape, and how to sit still in a train like a thoughtful man instead of talking like a fool and giving yourself away. And he, too, would glance at what is good time coming when they were to be in London for good and all. That prospect expanded and developed particulars. It presently took up a large part of Helen's conversation. Her conversations with Kipps were never of a grossly sentimental sort; there was a shyness of speech in that matter with both of them; but these new adumbrations were at least as interesting, and not so directly disagreeable, as what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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