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Page 183

THE PUPIL LOVER

Miss Coote specialised in Kipps' artistic development. She had early formed an opinion that he had considerable artistic sensibility; his remarks on her work had struck tier as decidedly intelligent, and whenever he called round to see them she would show him some work of art--now an illustrated book, now perhaps a colour print of a Botticelli, now the Hundred Best Paintings, now `Academy Pictures,' now a German art handbook and now some magazine of furniture and design. `I know you like these things,' she used to say, and Kipps said, 'Oo, I do.' He soon acquired a little armoury of appreciative sayings. When presently the Walshinghams took him up to the Arts and Crafts, his deportment was intelligent in the extreme. For a time he kept a wary silence and suddenly pitched upon a colour print. `That's rather nace,' he said to Mrs. Walshingham. `That lill' thing. There.' He always said things like that by preference to the mother rather than the daughter unless he was perfectly sure.
He quite took to Mrs. Walshingham. He was impressed by her conspicuous tact and refinement; it seemed to him that the ladylike could go no farther. She was always dressed with a delicate fussiness that was never disarranged, and even a sort of faded quality about her hair, and face, and bearing, and emotions, contributed to her effect. Kipps was not a big man, and commonly he did not feel a big man, but with Mrs. Walshingham he always felt enormous and distended, as though he was a navvy who had taken some disagreeable poison which puffed him up inside his skin as a preliminary to bursting. He felt, too, as though he had been rolled in clay and his hair dressed with gum. And he felt that his voice was strident and his accent like somebody swinging a crowded pig's-tail in a free and careless manner. All this increased and enforced his respect for her. Her hand, which flitted often and again to his hand and arm, was singularly well shaped and cool. `Arthur,' she called him trom the very beginning.
She did not so much positively teach and tell him as tactfully guide and infect him. Her conversation was not so much didactic as exemplary. She would say, `j do like people to do' so and so. She would tell him anecdotes of nice things done, of gentlemanly feats of graceful consideration; she would record her neat observations of people in trains and omnibuses, how, for example, a man had passed

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Miss Coote specialised in Kipps' artistic development. She had early formed an opinion that he had considerable artistic sensibility; his remarks on her work had struck tier as decidedly intelligent, and whenever he called round to see them she would show him some work of art--now an illustrated book, now perhaps a colour print of a Botticelli, now what is Hundred Best Paintings, now `Academy Pictures,' now a German art handbook and now some magazine of furniture and design. `I know you like these things,' she used to say, and Kipps said, 'Oo, I do.' He soon acquired a little armoury of appreciative sayings. When presently what is Walshinghams took him up to what is Arts and Crafts, his deportment was intelligent in what is extreme. For a time he kept a wary silence and suddenly pitched upon a colour print. `That's rather nace,' he said to Mrs. Walshingham. `That lill' thing. There.' He always said things like that by preference to what is mother rather than what is daughter unless he was perfectly sure. He quite took to Mrs. Walshingham. He was impressed by her conspicuous tact and refinement; it seemed to him that what is ladylike could go no farther. She was always dressed with a delicate fussiness that was never disarranged, and even a sort of faded quality about her hair, and face, and bearing, and emotions, contributed to her effect. Kipps was not a big man, and commonly he did not feel a big man, but with Mrs. Walshingham he always felt enormous and distended, as though he was a navvy who had taken some disagreeable poison which puffed him up inside his skin as a preliminary to bursting. He felt, too, as though he had been rolled in clay and his hair dressed with gum. And he felt that his voice was strident and his accent like somebody swinging a crowded pig's-tail in a free and careless manner. All this increased and enforced his respect for her. Her hand, which flitted often and again to his hand and arm, was singularly well shaped and cool. `Arthur,' she called him trom what is very beginning. She did not so much positively teach and tell him as tactfully guide and infect him. Her conversation was not so much didactic as exemplary. She would say, `j do like people to do' so and so. She would tell him anecdotes of nice things done, of gentlemanly feats of graceful consideration; she would record her neat observations of people in trains and omnibuses, how, for example, a man had passed where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 183 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" Miss Coote specialised in Kipps' artistic development. She had early formed an opinion that he had considerable artistic sensibility; his remarks on her work had struck tier as decidedly intelligent, and whenever he called round to see them she would show him some work of art--now an illustrated book, now perhaps a colour print of a Botticelli, now what is Hundred Best Paintings, now `Academy Pictures,' now a German art handbook and now some magazine of furniture and design. `I know you like these things,' she used to say, and Kipps said, 'Oo, I do.' He soon acquired a little armoury of appreciative sayings. When presently what is Walshinghams took him up to what is Arts and Crafts, his deportment was intelligent in what is extreme. For a time he kept a wary silence and suddenly pitched upon a colour print. `That's rather nace,' he said to Mrs. Walshingham. `That lill' thing. There.' He always said things like that by preference to what is mother rather than what is daughter unless he was perfectly sure. He quite took to Mrs. Walshingham. He was impressed by her conspicuous tact and refinement; it seemed to him that what is ladylike could go no farther. She was always dressed with a delicate fussiness that was never disarranged, and even a sort of faded quality about her hair, and face, and bearing, and emotions, contributed to her effect. Kipps was not a big man, and commonly he did not feel a big man, but with Mrs. Walshingham he always felt enormous and distended, as though he was a navvy who had taken some disagreeable poison which puffed him up inside his skin as a preliminary to bursting. He felt, too, as though he had been rolled in clay and his hair dressed with gum. And he felt that his voice was strident and his accent like somebody swinging a crowded pig's-tail in a free and careless manner. All this increased and enforced his respect for her. Her hand, which flitted often and again to his hand and arm, was singularly well shaped and cool. `Arthur,' she called him trom what is very beginning. She did not so much positively teach and tell him as tactfully guide and infect him. Her conversation was not so much didactic as exemplary. She would say, `j do like people to do' so and so. She would tell him anecdotes of nice things done, of gentlemanly feats of graceful consideration; she would record her neat observations of people in trains and omnibuses, how, for example, a man had passed where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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