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Page 182

THE PUPIL LOVER

2
All that declining summer Kipps was the pupil lover. He made an extraordinarily open secret of his desire for selfimprovement; indeed Helen had to hint once or twice that his modest frankness was excessive, and all this new circle of friends did, each after his or her manner, everything that was possible to supplement Helen's efforts and help him to ease and skill in the more cultivated circles to which he had come. Coote was still the chief teacher, the tutor-there are so many little difficulties that a man may take to another man that he would not care to propound to the woman he loves-but they were all, so to speak, upon the staff. Even the freckled girl said to him once in a pleasant way, `You mustn't say "contre temps," you must say "contraytom," ' when he borrowed that expression from Manners and Rules, and she tried, at his own suggestion, to give him clear ideas upon the subject of `as' and `has.' A certain confusion between these words was becoming evident, the first-fruits of a lesson from Chitterlow on the aspirate. Hitherto he had discarded that dangerous letter almost altogether, but now he would pull up at words beginning with `h' and draw a sawing breath-rather like a startled kitten -and then aspirate with vigour.
Said Kipps one day, `As'e?-I should say, ah--Has'e? Ye know I got a lot of difficulty over them two words, which is which?'
`Well, "as" is a conjunction, and "has" is a verb.'
`I know,' said Kipps, `but when is "has" a conjunction and when is "as" a verb?'
`Well,' said the freckled girl, preparing to be very lucid. `It's has when it means one has, meaning having, but if it isn't it's as. As, for instance, one says 'e-I mean he-He has. But one says-"as he has."'
`I see,' said Kipps. `So I ought to say "as 'e"?'
`NO, if you are asking a question you say has 'e--I mean he-'as he?' She blushed quite brightly, but still clung to her air of lucidity.
`I see,' said Kipps. He was about to say something further, but he desisted. `I got it much clearer now. Has
'e? Has 'e as. Yes.'
`If you remember about having.' `Oo, I will,' said Kipps ....

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE where is strong 2 All that declining summer Kipps was what is pupil lover. He made an extraordinarily open secret of his desire for selfimprovement; indeed Helen had to hint once or twice that his modest frankness was excessive, and all this new circle of friends did, each after his or her manner, everything that was possible to supplement Helen's efforts and help him to ease and s what time is it in what is more cultivated circles to which he had come. Coote was still what is chief teacher, what is tutor-there are so many little difficulties that a man may take to another man that he would not care to propound to what is woman he loves-but they were all, so to speak, upon what is staff. Even what is freckled girl said to him once in a pleasant way, `You mustn't say "contre temps," you must say "contraytom," ' when he borrowed that expression from Manners and Rules, and she tried, at his own suggestion, to give him clear ideas upon what is subject of `as' and `has.' A certain confusion between these words was becoming evident, what is first-fruits of a lesson from Chitterlow on what is aspirate. Hitherto he had discarded that dangerous letter almost altogether, but now he would pull up at words beginning with `h' and draw a sawing breath-rather like a startled kitten -and then aspirate with vigour. Said Kipps one day, `As'e?-I should say, ah--Has'e? Ye know I got a lot of difficulty over them two words, which is which?' `Well, "as" is a conjunction, and "has" is a verb.' `I know,' said Kipps, `but when is "has" a conjunction and when is "as" a verb?' `Well,' said what is freckled girl, preparing to be very lucid. `It's has when it means one has, meaning having, but if it isn't it's as. As, for instance, one says 'e-I mean he-He has. But one says-"as he has."' `I see,' said Kipps. `So I ought to say "as 'e"?' `NO, if you are asking a question you say has 'e--I mean he-'as he?' She blushed quite brightly, but still clung to her air of lucidity. `I see,' said Kipps. He was about to say something further, but he desisted. `I got it much clearer now. Has 'e? Has 'e as. Yes.' `If you remember about having.' `Oo, I will,' said Kipps .... where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 182 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" where is strong 2 All that declining summer Kipps was what is pupil lover. He made an extraordinarily open secret of his desire for selfimprovement; indeed Helen had to hint once or twice that his modest frankness was excessive, and all this new circle of friends did, each after his or her manner, everything that was possible to supplement Helen's efforts and help him to ease and s what time is it in what is more cultivated circles to which he had come. Coote was still what is chief teacher, what is tutor-there are so many little difficulties that a man may take to another man that he would not care to propound to what is woman he loves-but they were all, so to speak, upon the staff. Even what is freckled girl said to him once in a pleasant way, `You mustn't say "contre temps," you must say "contraytom," ' when he borrowed that expression from Manners and Rules, and she tried, at his own suggestion, to give him clear ideas upon the subject of `as' and `has.' A certain confusion between these words was becoming evident, what is first-fruits of a lesson from Chitterlow on what is aspirate. Hitherto he had discarded that dangerous letter almost altogether, but now he would pull up at words beginning with `h' and draw a sawing breath-rather like a startled kitten -and then aspirate with vigour. Said Kipps one day, `As'e?-I should say, ah--Has'e? Ye know I got a lot of difficulty over them two words, which is which?' `Well, "as" is a conjunction, and "has" is a verb.' `I know,' said Kipps, `but when is "has" a conjunction and when is "as" a verb?' `Well,' said what is freckled girl, preparing to be very lucid. `It's has when it means one has, meaning having, but if it isn't it's as. As, for instance, one says 'e-I mean he-He has. But one says-"as he has."' `I see,' said Kipps. `So I ought to say "as 'e"?' `NO, if you are asking a question you say has 'e--I mean he-'as he?' She blushed quite brightly, but still clung to her air of lucidity. `I see,' said Kipps. He was about to say something further, but he desisted. `I got it much clearer now. Has 'e? Has 'e as. Yes.' `If you remember about having.' `Oo, I will,' said Kipps .... where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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