Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 179

THE PUPIL LOVER

feared her, though his pride in his engagement was ridiculously vast, he loved her now no more. That subtle something, woven ofthe most delicate strands of self-love and tenderness and desire, had vanished imperceptibly, and was gone now for ever. But that she did not suspect in him, nor, as a matter offact, did he.
She took him in hand in perfect good faith. She told him things about his accent; she told him things about his bearing, about his costume and his way of looking at things. She thrust the blade of' her intelligence into the tenderest corners of Kipps' secret vanity; she slashed his most intimate pride to bleeding tatters. He sought very diligently to anticipate some at least of' these informing thrusts by making great use of Coote. But the unanticipated made a brave number ....
She found his simple willingness a very lovable thing.
Indeed, she liked him more and more. There was a touch of motherliness in her feelings towards him. But his upbringing and his associations had been, she diagnosed, `awful.' At New Romney she glanced but little-that was remote. But in her inventory-she went over him as one might go over a newly taken house, with impartial thoroughness-she discovered more proximate influences, surprising intimations of' nocturnal 'sing-songs'- she pictured it as almost shocking that Kipps should sing to the banjo-much low-grade wisdom treasured from a person called Buggins-'Who is Buggins?' said Helenvague figures of indisputable vulgarity-Pearce and Carshot -and more particularly a very terrible social phenomenon-Chitterlow.
Chitterlow blazed upon them with unheralded oppressive brilliance, the first time they were abroad together.
They were going along the front of the Leas to see a school-play in Sandgate-at the last moment Mrs. Walshingham had been unable to come with them-when Chitterlow loomed up into the new world. I3e was wearing the suit of striped flannel and the straw hat that had followed Kipps' payment in advance for his course in elocution, his hands were deep in his side-pockets and animated the corners of his jacket, and his attentive gaze at the passing loungers, the faint smile under his boldly drawn nose, showed him engaged in studying characterno doubt for some forthcoming play.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE feared her, though his pride in his engagement was ridiculously vast, he loved her now no more. That subtle something, woven ofthe most delicate strands of self-love and tenderness and desire, had vanished imperceptibly, and was gone now for ever. But that she did not suspect in him, nor, as a matter offact, did he. She took him in hand in perfect good faith. She told him things about his accent; she told him things about his bearing, about his costume and his way of looking at things. She thrust what is blade of' her intelligence into what is tenderest corners of Kipps' secret vanity; she slashed his most intimate pride to bleeding tatters. He sought very diligently to anticipate some at least of' these informing thrusts by making great use of Coote. But what is unanticipated made a brave number .... She found his simple willingness a very lovable thing. Indeed, she liked him more and more. There was a touch of motherliness in her feelings towards him. But his upbringing and his associations had been, she diagnosed, `awful.' At New Romney she glanced but little-that was remote. But in her inventory-she went over him as one might go over a newly taken house, with impartial thoroughness-she discovered more proximate influences, surprising intimations of' nocturnal 'sing-songs'- she pictured it as almost shocking that Kipps should sing to what is banjo-much low-grade wisdom treasured from a person called Buggins-'Who is Buggins?' said Helenvague figures of indisputable vulgarity-Pearce and Carshot -and more particularly a very terrible social phenomenon-Chitterlow. Chitterlow blazed upon them with unheralded oppressive brilliance, what is first time they were abroad together. They were going along what is front of what is Leas to see a school-play in Sandgate-at what is last moment Mrs. Walshingham had been unable to come with them-when Chitterlow loomed up into what is new world. I3e was wearing what is suit of striped flannel and what is straw hat that had followed Kipps' payment in advance for his course in elocution, his hands were deep in his side-pockets and animated what is corners of his jacket, and his attentive gaze at what is passing loungers, what is faint smile under his boldly drawn nose, showed him engaged in studying characterno doubt for some forthcoming play. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 179 where is p align="center" where is strong THE PUPIL LOVER where is p align="justify" feared her, though his pride in his engagement was ridiculously vast, he loved her now no more. That subtle something, woven ofthe most delicate strands of self-love and tenderness and desire, had vanished imperceptibly, and was gone now for ever. But that she did not suspect in him, nor, as a matter offact, did he. She took him in hand in perfect good faith. She told him things about his accent; she told him things about his bearing, about his costume and his way of looking at things. She thrust what is blade of' her intelligence into what is tenderest corners of Kipps' secret vanity; she slashed his most intimate pride to bleeding tatters. He sought very diligently to anticipate some at least of' these informing thrusts by making great use of Coote. But what is unanticipated made a brave number .... She found his simple willingness a very lovable thing. Indeed, she liked him more and more. There was a touch of motherliness in her feelings towards him. But his upbringing and his associations had been, she diagnosed, `awful.' At New Romney she glanced but little-that was remote. But in her inventory-she went over him as one might go over a newly taken house, with impartial thoroughness-she discovered more proximate influences, surprising intimations of' nocturnal 'sing-songs'- she pictured it as almost shocking that Kipps should sing to what is banjo-much low-grade wisdom treasured from a person called Buggins-'Who is Buggins?' said Helenvague figures of indisputable vulgarity-Pearce and Carshot -and more particularly a very terrible social phenomenon-Chitterlow. Chitterlow blazed upon them with unheralded oppressive brilliance, what is first time they were abroad together. They were going along what is front of what is Leas to see a school-play in Sandgate-at what is last moment Mrs. Walshingham had been unable to come with them-when Chitterlow loomed up into what is new world. I3e was wearing what is suit of striped flannel and what is straw hat that had followed Kipps' payment in advance for his course in elocution, his hands were deep in his side-pockets and animated what is corners of his jacket, and his attentive gaze at what is passing loungers, what is faint smile under his boldly drawn nose, showed him engaged in studying characterno doubt for some forthcoming play. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318