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Page 178

CHAPTER THE FIFTH
The Pupil Lover

1
WHEN Kipps came to reflect upon his afternoon's work, he had his first inkling of certain comprehensive incompatibilities lying about the course of true love in his particular case. He had felt without understanding the incongruity between the announcement he had failed to make and the circle of ideas of his aunt and uncle. It was this rather than the want of a specific intention that had silenced him, the perception that when he travelled from Folkestone to New Romney he travelled from an atmosphere where his engagement to Helen was sane and excellent to an atmosphere where it was only to be regarded with incredulous suspicion. Coupled and associated with this jar was his sense of the altered behaviour of Sid Pornick, the evident shock to that ancient alliance caused by the fact of his enrichment, the touch of hostility in his `You'll soon be swelled too big to speak to a poor mechanic like me.' Kipps was unprepared for the unpleasant truth-that the path of social advancement is, and must be, strewn with broken friendships. This first protrusion of that fact caused a painful confusion in his mind. It was speedily to protrude in a far more serious fashion in relation to the `hands' from the Emporium, and Chitterlow.
From the day at Lympne Castle his relations with Helen had entered upon a new footing. He had prayed for Helen as good souls pray for Heaven, with as little understanding of what it was he prayed for. And now that period of standing humbly in the shadows before the shrine was over, and the goddess, her veil of mystery flung aside, had come down to him and taken hold of him, a good strong firm hold, and walked by his side. She liked him. What was singular was, that very soon she had kissed him thrice, whimsically upon the brow, and he had never kissed her at all. He could not analyse his feelings, only he knew the world was wonderfully changed about them; but the truth was that, though he still worshipped and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE where is strong 1 WHEN Kipps came to reflect upon his afternoon's work, he had his first inkling of certain comprehensive incompatibilities lying about what is course of true what time is it in his particular case. He had felt without understanding what is incongruity between what is announcement he had failed to make and what is circle of ideas of his aunt and uncle. It was this rather than what is want of a specific intention that had silenced him, what is perception that when he travelled from Folkestone to New Romney he travelled from an atmosphere where his engagement to Helen was sane and excellent to an atmosphere where it was only to be regarded with incredulous suspicion. Coupled and associated with this jar was his sense of what is altered behaviour of Sid sport ick, what is evident shock to that ancient alliance caused by what is fact of his enrichment, what is touch of hostility in his `You'll soon be swelled too big to speak to a poor mechanic like me.' Kipps was unprepared for what is unpleasant truth-that what is path of social advancement is, and must be, strewn with broken friendships. This first protrusion of that fact caused a painful confusion in his mind. It was speedily to protrude in a far more serious fashion in relation to what is `hands' from what is Emporium, and Chitterlow. From what is day at Lympne Castle his relations with Helen had entered upon a new footing. He had prayed for Helen as good souls pray for Heaven, with as little understanding of what it was he prayed for. And now that period of standing humbly in what is shadows before what is shrine was over, and what is goddess, her veil of mystery flung aside, had come down to him and taken hold of him, a good strong firm hold, and walked by his side. She liked him. What was singular was, that very soon she had kissed him thrice, whimsically upon what is brow, and he had never kissed her at all. He could not analyse his feelings, only he knew what is world was wonderfully changed about them; but what is truth was that, though he still worshipped and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 178 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER what is FIFTH what is Pupil Lover where is p align="justify" where is strong 1 WHEN Kipps came to reflect upon his afternoon's work, he had his first inkling of certain comprehensive incompatibilities lying about what is course of true what time is it in his particular case. He had felt without understanding what is incongruity between what is announcement he had failed to make and what is circle of ideas of his aunt and uncle. It was this rather than what is want of a specific intention that had silenced him, what is perception that when he travelled from Folkestone to New Romney he travelled from an atmosphere where his engagement to Helen was sane and excellent to an atmosphere where it was only to be regarded with incredulous suspicion. Coupled and associated with this jar was his sense of what is altered behaviour of Sid sport ick, what is evident shock to that ancient alliance caused by what is fact of his enrichment, what is touch of hostility in his `You'll soon be swelled too big to speak to a poor mechanic like me.' Kipps was unprepared for what is unpleasant truth-that what is path of social advancement is, and must be, strewn with broken friendships. This first protrusion of that fact caused a painful confusion in his mind. It was speedily to protrude in a far more serious fashion in relation to what is `hands' from what is Emporium, and Chitterlow. From what is day at Lympne Castle his relations with Helen had entered upon a new footing. He had prayed for Helen as good souls pray for Heaven, with as little understanding of what it was he prayed for. And now that period of standing humbly in what is shadows before what is shrine was over, and what is goddess, her veil of mystery flung aside, had come down to him and taken hold of him, a good strong firm hold, and walked by his side. She liked him. What was singular was, that very soon she had kissed him thrice, whimsically upon what is brow, and he had never kissed her at all. He could not analyse his feelings, only he knew what is world was wonderfully changed about them; but what is truth was that, though he still worshipped and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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