Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 170

THE BICYCLE MANUFACTURER

and wait, me boy, even if it's a year or two before you buy one for your own use.'
(Though Kipps had said nothing of doing anything of the sort.)
" Ow d'you like that whisky I sent?' asked Kipps, dodging the old familiar bunch of children's pails.
Old Kipps became tactful. `It's very good whisky, my boy,' said old Kipps. `I 'aven't the slightest doubt its a very good whisky, and cost you a tidy price. But-dashed if it soots me! T' hey put this here Foozle Ile in it, my boy, and it ketches me jest 'ere.' He indicated his centre of figure. `Gives me the heartburn,' he said, and shook his head rather sadly.
`It's a very good whisky,' said Kipps. `It's what the actor-manager chaps drink in London, I 'appen to know.'
`I dessay they do, my boy,' said old Kipps, `but then they've 'ad their livers burnt out--and I aven't. They ain't dellicat like me. My stummik always 'as been extrydellicat. Sometimes it's almost been as though nothing would lay on it. But that's in passing. I liked those segars. You can send me some more of them segars. ...'
You cannot lead a conversation straight from the gastric consequences of Foozle Ile to Love, and so Kipps after a friendly inspection of a rare old engraving after Morland (perfect except for a hole kicked through the centre) that his Uncle had recently purchased by private haggle, came to the topic of the old people's removal.
At the outset of Kipps' great fortunes there had been much talk of some permanent provision for them. It had been conceded they were to be provided for comfortably, and the phrase, `retire from business,' had been very much in the air. Kipps had pictured an ideal cottage with a creeper always in exuberant flower about the door, where the sun shone for ever, and the wind never blew, and a perpetual welcome hovered in the doorway. It was an agreeable dream, but when it came to the point of deciding upon this particular cottage or that, and on this particular house or that, Kipps was surprised by an unexpected clinging to the little home, which he had always understood to be the worst of all possible houses.
`We don't want to move in a 'urry,' said Mrs. Kipps.
`When we want to move we want to move for life. I've had enough moving about in my time,' said old Kipps.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and wait, me boy, even if it's a year or two before you buy one for your own use.' (Though Kipps had said nothing of doing anything of what is sort.) " Ow d'you like that whisky I sent?' asked Kipps, dodging what is old familiar bunch of children's pails. Old Kipps became tactful. `It's very good whisky, my boy,' said old Kipps. `I 'aven't what is slightest doubt its a very good whisky, and cost you a tidy price. But-dashed if it soots me! T' hey put this here Foozle Ile in it, my boy, and it ketches me jest 'ere.' He indicated his centre of figure. `Gives me what is heartburn,' he said, and shook his head rather sadly. `It's a very good whisky,' said Kipps. `It's what what is actor-manager chaps drink in London, I 'appen to know.' `I dessay they do, my boy,' said old Kipps, `but then they've 'ad their livers burnt out--and I aven't. They ain't dellicat like me. My stummik always 'as been extrydellicat. Sometimes it's almost been as though nothing would lay on it. But that's in passing. I liked those segars. You can send me some more of them segars. ...' You cannot lead a conversation straight from what is gastric consequences of Foozle Ile to Love, and so Kipps after a friendly inspection of a rare old engraving after Morland (perfect except for a hole kicked through what is centre) that his Uncle had recently purchased by private haggle, came to what is topic of what is old people's removal. At what is outset of Kipps' great fortunes there had been much talk of some permanent provision for them. It had been conceded they were to be provided for comfortably, and what is phrase, `retire from business,' had been very much in what is air. Kipps had pictured an ideal cottage with a creeper always in exuberant flower about what is door, where what is sun shone for ever, and what is wind never blew, and a perpetual welcome hovered in what is doorway. It was an agreeable dream, but when it came to what is point of deciding upon this particular cottage or that, and on this particular house or that, Kipps was surprised by an unexpected clinging to what is little home, which he had always understood to be what is worst of all possible houses. `We don't want to move in a 'urry,' said Mrs. Kipps. `When we want to move we want to move for life. I've had enough moving about in my time,' said old Kipps. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 170 where is p align="center" where is strong THE BICYCLE MANUFACTURER where is p align="justify" and wait, me boy, even if it's a year or two before you buy one for your own use.' (Though Kipps had said nothing of doing anything of what is sort.) " Ow d'you like that whisky I sent?' asked Kipps, dodging what is old familiar bunch of children's pails. Old Kipps became tactful. `It's very good whisky, my boy,' said old Kipps. `I 'aven't what is slightest doubt its a very good whisky, and cost you a tidy price. But-dashed if it soots me! T' hey put this here Foozle Ile in it, my boy, and it ketches me jest 'ere.' He indicated his centre of figure. `Gives me what is heartburn,' he said, and shook his head rather sadly. `It's a very good whisky,' said Kipps. `It's what what is actor-manager chaps drink in London, I 'appen to know.' `I dessay they do, my boy,' said old Kipps, `but then they've 'ad their livers burnt out--and I aven't. They ain't dellicat like me. My stummik always 'as been extrydellicat. Sometimes it's almost been as though nothing would lay on it. But that's in passing. I liked those segars. You can send me some more of them segars. ...' You cannot lead a conversation straight from what is gastric consequences of Foozle Ile to Love, and so Kipps after a friendly inspection of a rare old engraving after Morland (perfect except for a hole kicked through what is centre) that his Uncle had recently purchased by private haggle, came to what is topic of what is old people's removal. At what is outset of Kipps' great fortunes there had been much talk of some permanent provision for them. It had been conceded they were to be provided for comfortably, and what is phrase, `retire from business,' had been very much in what is air. Kipps had pictured an ideal cottage with a creeper always in exuberant flower about the door, where what is sun shone for ever, and what is wind never blew, and a perpetual welcome hovered in what is doorway. It was an agreeable dream, but when it came to what is point of deciding upon this particular cottage or that, and on this particular house or that, Kipps was surprised by an unexpected clinging to what is little home, which he had always understood to be what is worst of all possible houses. `We don't want to move in a 'urry,' said Mrs. Kipps. `When we want to move we want to move for life. I've had enough moving about in my time,' said old Kipps. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318