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Page 165

ENGAGED

ment. She displayed an amount of tenderness that touched him.
`This is a great thing,' she said, `to a mother,' and her hand rested for a moment on his impeccable coat-sleeve.
`A daughter, Arthur,' she exclaimed, `is so much more than a son.'
Marriage, she said, was a lottery, and without love and toleration-there was much unhappiness. Her life had not always been bright-there had been dark days and bright days. She smiled rather sweetly. `This is a bright one,'she said.
Shesaidvery kind and flattering things to Kipps, and she thanked him for his goodness to her son. ('That wasn't anything,' said Kipps.) And then she expanded upon the theme of her two children. `Both so accomplished,' she said, `so clever. I call them my Twin Jewels.'
She was repeating a remark she had made at Lympne that she always said her children needed opportunities as other people needed air, when she was abruptly arrested by the entry of Helen. They hung on a pause, Helen perhaps surprised by Kipps' week-day magnificence. Then she advanced with outstretched hand.
Both the young people were shy. `I jest called round,' began Kipps, and became uncertain how to end.
`Won't you have some tea?' asked Helen.
She walked to the window, looked at the familiar outporter's barrow, turned, surveyed Kipps for a moment ambiguously, said, `I will get some tea,' and so departed again.
Mrs. Walshingham and Kipps looked at one another, and the lady smiled indulgently. `You two young people mustn't be shy of each other,' said Mrs. Walshingham, which damaged Kipps considerably.
She was explaining how sensitive Helen always had been, even about quite little things, when the servant appeared with the tea-things; and then Helen followed, and, taking up a secure position behind the little bamboo tea-table, broke the ice with officious teacup clattering. Then she introduced the topic of a forth-coming open-air performance of As You Like It, and steered past the worst of the awkwardness. They discussed stage illusion. `I mus' Say,' said Kipps, `I don't quite like a play in a theayter. It seems sort of unreal some'ow.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ment. She displayed an amount of tenderness that touched him. `This is a great thing,' she said, `to a mother,' and her hand rested for a moment on his impeccable coat-sleeve. `A daughter, Arthur,' she exclaimed, `is so much more than a son.' Marriage, she said, was a lottery, and without what time is it and toleration-there was much unhappiness. Her life had not always been bright-there had been dark days and bright days. She smiled rather sweetly. `This is a bright one,'she said. Shesaidvery kind and flattering things to Kipps, and she thanked him for his goodness to her son. ('That wasn't anything,' said Kipps.) And then she expanded upon what is theme of her two children. `Both so accomplished,' she said, `so clever. I call them my Twin Jewels.' She was repeating a remark she had made at Lympne that she always said her children needed opportunities as other people needed air, when she was abruptly arrested by what is entry of Helen. They hung on a pause, Helen perhaps surprised by Kipps' week-day magnificence. Then she advanced with outstretched hand. Both what is young people were shy. `I jest called round,' began Kipps, and became uncertain how to end. `Won't you have some tea?' asked Helen. She walked to what is window, looked at what is familiar outporter's barrow, turned, surveyed Kipps for a moment ambiguously, said, `I will get some tea,' and so departed again. Mrs. Walshingham and Kipps looked at one another, and what is lady smiled indulgently. `You two young people mustn't be shy of each other,' said Mrs. Walshingham, which damaged Kipps considerably. She was explaining how sensitive Helen always had been, even about quite little things, when what is servant appeared with what is tea-things; and then Helen followed, and, taking up a secure position behind what is little bamboo tea-table, broke what is ice with officious teacup clattering. Then she introduced what is topic of a forth-coming open-air performance of As You Like It, and steered past what is worst of what is awkwardness. They discussed stage illusion. `I mus' Say,' said Kipps, `I don't quite like a play in a theayter. It seems sort of unreal some'ow.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 165 where is p align="center" where is strong ENGAGED where is p align="justify" ment. She displayed an amount of tenderness that touched him. `This is a great thing,' she said, `to a mother,' and her hand rested for a moment on his impeccable coat-sleeve. `A daughter, Arthur,' she exclaimed, `is so much more than a son.' Marriage, she said, was a lottery, and without what time is it and toleration-there was much unhappiness. Her life had not always been bright-there had been dark days and bright days. She smiled rather sweetly. `This is a bright one,'she said. Shesaidvery kind and flattering things to Kipps, and she thanked him for his goodness to her son. ('That wasn't anything,' said Kipps.) And then she expanded upon what is theme of her two children. `Both so accomplished,' she said, `so clever. I call them my Twin Jewels.' She was repeating a remark she had made at Lympne that she always said her children needed opportunities as other people needed air, when she was abruptly arrested by what is entry of Helen. They hung on a pause, Helen perhaps surprised by Kipps' week-day magnificence. Then she advanced with outstretched hand. Both what is young people were shy. `I jest called round,' began Kipps, and became uncertain how to end. `Won't you have some tea?' asked Helen. She walked to what is window, looked at what is familiar outporter's barrow, turned, surveyed Kipps for a moment ambiguously, said, `I will get some tea,' and so departed again. Mrs. Walshingham and Kipps looked at one another, and what is lady smiled indulgently. `You two young people mustn't be shy of each other,' said Mrs. Walshingham, which damaged Kipps considerably. She was explaining how sensitive Helen always had been, even about quite little things, when what is servant appeared with what is tea-things; and then Helen followed, and, taking up a secure position behind what is little bamboo tea-table, broke what is ice with officious teacup clattering. Then she introduced what is topic of a forth-coming open-air performance of As You Like It, and steered past what is worst of the awkwardness. They discussed stage illusion. `I mus' Say,' said Kipps, `I don't quite like a play in a theayter. It seems sort of unreal some'ow.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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