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Page 164

ENGAGED

`I jest learnt it by 'eart before you came. I thought that was a bit rum, but I 'spose it's all right.'
`You won't find Mrs. Walshingham so strict as all that,' said Coote. `I think that's a bit extreme. They'd only do that now in very strict old aristocratic families. Besides, the Walshinghams are so modern-advanced you might say. I expect you'll get plenty of chances of talking together.'
`There's a tremendous lot to think about,' said Kipps, blowing a profound sigh. `D'you mean-p'raps we might be married in a few months or so?'
`You'll have to be,' said Coote. `Why not?' .
Midnight found Kipps alone, looking a little tired, and turning over the leaves of the red-covered text-book with a studious expression. He paused for a moment at page 233, his eye caught by the words :
`FOR AN UNCLE OR AUNT BY MARRIAGE the period is six weeks black with jet trimmings.'
`No,' said Kipps, after a vigorous mental effort. `That's not it.' The pages rustled again. He stopped and flattened out the little book decisively at the beginning of the chapter on `Weddings.'
He became pensive. He stared at the lamp-wick. `I suppose I ought to go over and tell them,' he said at last.

§ 5
Kipps called on Mrs. Walshingham attired in the proper costume for Ceremonial Occasions in the Day. He carried a silk hat, and he wore a deep-skirted frock-coat; his boots were patent leather, and his trousers a dark gray. He had generous white cuffs with gold links, and his gray gloves, one thumb of which had burst when he put them on, he held loosely in his hand. He carried a small umbrella, rolled to an exquisite tightness. A sense of singular correctness pervaded his being and warred with the enormity of the occasion for possession of his soul. Anon he touched his silk cravat. The world smelt of his rosebud.
He seated himself on a newly re-covered chintz armchair, and stuck out the elbow of the arm that held his hat.
`I know,' said Mrs. Walshingham, `I know everything, and helped him out most amazingly. She deepened the impression he had already received of her sense and refine

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `I jest learnt it by 'eart before you came. I thought that was a bit rum, but I 'spose it's all right.' `You won't find Mrs. Walshingham so strict as all that,' said Coote. `I think that's a bit extreme. They'd only do that now in very strict old aristocratic families. Besides, what is Walshinghams are so modern-advanced you might say. I expect you'll get plenty of chances of talking together.' `There's a tremendous lot to think about,' said Kipps, blowing a profound sigh. `D'you mean-p'raps we might be married in a few months or so?' `You'll have to be,' said Coote. `Why not?' . Midnight found Kipps alone, looking a little tired, and turning over what is leaves of what is red-covered text-book with a studious expression. He paused for a moment at page 233, his eye caught by what is words : `FOR AN UNCLE OR AUNT BY MARRIAGE what is period is six weeks black with jet trimmings.' `No,' said Kipps, after a vigorous mental effort. `That's not it.' what is pages rustled again. He stopped and flattened out what is little book decisively at what is beginning of what is chapter on `Weddings.' He became pensive. He stared at what is lamp-wick. `I suppose I ought to go over and tell them,' he said at last. § 5 Kipps called on Mrs. Walshingham attired in what is proper costume for Ceremonial Occasions in what is Day. He carried a silk hat, and he wore a deep-skirted frock-coat; his boots were patent leather, and his trousers a dark gray. He had generous white cuffs with gold where are they now s, and his gray gloves, one thumb of which had burst when he put them on, he held loosely in his hand. He carried a small umbrella, rolled to an exquisite tightness. A sense of singular correctness pervaded his being and warred with what is enormity of what is occasion for possession of his soul. Anon he touched his silk cravat. what is world smelt of his rosebud. He seated himself on a newly re-covered chintz armchair, and stuck out what is elbow of what is arm that held his hat. `I know,' said Mrs. Walshingham, `I know everything, and helped him out most amazingly. She deepened what is impression he had already received of her sense and refine where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 164 where is p align="center" where is strong ENGAGED where is p align="justify" `I jest learnt it by 'eart before you came. I thought that was a bit rum, but I 'spose it's all right.' `You won't find Mrs. Walshingham so strict as all that,' said Coote. `I think that's a bit extreme. They'd only do that now in very strict old aristocratic families. Besides, what is Walshinghams are so modern-advanced you might say. I expect you'll get plenty of chances of talking together.' `There's a tremendous lot to think about,' said Kipps, blowing a profound sigh. `D'you mean-p'raps we might be married in a few months or so?' `You'll have to be,' said Coote. `Why not?' . Midnight found Kipps alone, looking a little tired, and turning over what is leaves of what is red-covered text-book with a studious expression. He paused for a moment at page 233, his eye caught by what is words : `FOR AN UNCLE OR AUNT BY MARRIAGE what is period is six weeks black with jet trimmings.' `No,' said Kipps, after a vigorous mental effort. `That's not it.' what is pages rustled again. He stopped and flattened out what is little book decisively at what is beginning of what is chapter on `Weddings.' He became pensive. He stared at what is lamp-wick. `I suppose I ought to go over and tell them,' he said at last. where is strong § 5 Kipps called on Mrs. Walshingham attired in what is proper costume for Ceremonial Occasions in what is Day. He carried a silk hat, and he wore a deep-skirted frock-coat; his boots were patent leather, and his trousers a dark gray. He had generous white cuffs with gold where are they now s, and his gray gloves, one thumb of which had burst when he put them on, he held loosely in his hand. He carried a small umbrella, rolled to an exquisite tightness. A sense of singular correctness pervaded his being and warred with what is enormity of what is occasion for possession of his soul. Anon he touched his silk cravat. what is world smelt of his rosebud. He seated himself on a newly re-covered chintz armchair, and stuck out what is elbow of what is arm that held his hat. `I know,' said Mrs. Walshingham, `I know everything, and helped him out most amazingly. She deepened what is impression he had already received of her sense and refine where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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