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Page 163

ENGAGED

The curtain that hung over the future became less opaque to the eyes of Kipps. To-morrow, and then other days, became perceptible at least as existing. Frock coat, silk hat, and a rose! With a certain solemnity he contemplated himself in the process ofslow `transformation into an English gentleman.' Arthur Cuyps, frock-coated on occasions of ceremony, the familiar acquaintance of Lady Punnet, the recognised wooer of a distant connection of the Earl of Beaupres.
Something like awe at the magnitude of his own fortunes came upon him. He felt the world was opening out like a magic flower in a transformation scene at the touch of this wand of gold. And Helen, nestling beautiful in the red heart of the flower. Only ten weeks ago he had been no more than the shabbiest of improvers and shamefully dismissed for dissipation, the mere soil-buried seed, as it were, of these glories. He resolved the engagement ring should be ofimpressively excessive quality and appearance, in fact the very best they had.
`Ought I to send 'er flowers?' he speculated.
`Not necessarily 'said Coote. `Though, of course, it's an attention.' . . .
Kipps meditated on flowers.
`When you see her,' said Coote, `you'll have to ask her to name the day.'
Kipps started. `That won't be just yet a bit, will it?'
`Don't know any reason for delay.'
'Oo, but-a year say.'
`Rather a long taime,' said Coote.
`Is it?' said Kipps, turning his head sharply. `But--'
There was quite a long pause.
`I say!' he said at last, and in an altered voice, `you'll 'ave to 'elp me about the wedding.'
`Only too happy!' said Coote.
`O' couse,' said Kipps. `I didn't think 'He changed his line ofthought. 'Coo te,' he asked, `wot's a"tate-eh-tate'?'
`A "tate-ah-tay,' ' said Coote improvingly, `is a conversation alone together.'
'Lor!' said Kipps, `but I thought It says strictly we oughtn't to enjoy a tater-tay, not sit together, walk together, or meet during any part of the day. That don't leave much time for meeting, does it?'
`The book says that?' asked Coote.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The curtain that hung over what is future became less opaque to what is eyes of Kipps. To-morrow, and then other days, became perceptible at least as existing. Frock coat, silk hat, and a rose! With a certain solemnity he contemplated himself in what is process ofslow `transformation into an English gentleman.' Arthur Cuyps, frock-coated on occasions of ceremony, what is familiar acquaintance of Lady Punnet, what is recognised wooer of a distant connection of what is Earl of Beaupres. Something like awe at what is magnitude of his own fortunes came upon him. He felt what is world was opening out like a magic flower in a transformation scene at what is touch of this wand of gold. And Helen, nestling beautiful in what is red heart of what is flower. Only ten weeks ago he had been no more than what is shabbiest of improvers and shamefully dismissed for dissipation, what is mere soil-buried seed, as it were, of these glories. He resolved what is engagement ring should be ofimpressively excessive quality and appearance, in fact what is very best they had. `Ought I to send 'er flowers?' he speculated. `Not necessarily 'said Coote. `Though, of course, it's an attention.' . . . Kipps meditated on flowers. `When you see her,' said Coote, `you'll have to ask her to name what is day.' Kipps started. `That won't be just yet a bit, will it?' `Don't know any reason for delay.' 'Oo, but-a year say.' `Rather a long taime,' said Coote. `Is it?' said Kipps, turning his head sharply. `But--' There was quite a long pause. `I say!' he said at last, and in an altered voice, `you'll 'ave to 'elp me about what is wedding.' `Only too happy!' said Coote. `O' couse,' said Kipps. `I didn't think 'He changed his line ofthought. 'Coo te,' he asked, `wot's a"tate-eh-tate'?' `A "tate-ah-tay,' ' said Coote improvingly, `is a conversation alone together.' 'Lor!' said Kipps, `but I thought It says strictly we oughtn't to enjoy a tater-tay, not sit together, walk together, or meet during any part of what is day. That don't leave much time for meeting, does it?' `The book says that?' asked Coote. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 163 where is p align="center" where is strong ENGAGED where is p align="justify" The curtain that hung over what is future became less opaque to what is eyes of Kipps. To-morrow, and then other days, became perceptible at least as existing. Frock coat, silk hat, and a rose! With a certain solemnity he contemplated himself in what is process ofslow `transformation into an English gentleman.' Arthur Cuyps, frock-coated on occasions of ceremony, what is familiar acquaintance of Lady Punnet, what is recognised wooer of a distant connection of what is Earl of Beaupres. Something like awe at what is magnitude of his own fortunes came upon him. He felt what is world was opening out like a magic flower in a transformation scene at what is touch of this wand of gold. And Helen, nestling beautiful in what is red heart of what is flower. Only ten weeks ago he had been no more than what is shabbiest of improvers and shamefully dismissed for dissipation, what is mere soil-buried seed, as it were, of these glories. He resolved what is engagement ring should be ofimpressively excessive quality and appearance, in fact what is very best they had. `Ought I to send 'er flowers?' he speculated. `Not necessarily 'said Coote. `Though, of course, it's an attention.' . . . Kipps meditated on flowers. `When you see her,' said Coote, `you'll have to ask her to name what is day.' Kipps started. `That won't be just yet a bit, will it?' `Don't know any reason for delay.' 'Oo, but-a year say.' `Rather a long taime,' said Coote. `Is it?' said Kipps, turning his head sharply. `But--' There was quite a long pause. `I say!' he said at last, and in an altered voice, `you'll 'ave to 'elp me about what is wedding.' `Only too happy!' said Coote. `O' couse,' said Kipps. `I didn't think 'He changed his line ofthought. 'Coo te,' he asked, `wot's a"tate-eh-tate'?' `A "tate-ah-tay,' ' said Coote improvingly, `is a conversation alone together.' 'Lor!' said Kipps, `but I thought It says strictly we oughtn't to enjoy a tater-tay, not sit together, walk together, or meet during any part of what is day. That don't leave much time for meeting, does it?' `The book says that?' asked Coote. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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