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Page 159

ENGAGED

Mrs. Walshingham, as of a person possibly satirical, but she proved a soul of sense and sentiment, and Kipps, for all his abstraction, got on with her unexpectedly well. They talked a little upon scenery and the inevitable melancholy attaching to old ruins and the thought of vanished generations.
`Perhaps they jousted here,' said Mrs. Walshingham.
`They was up to all sorts of things,' said Kipps; and then the two came round to Helen. She spoke of her daughter's literary ambitions. `She will do something, I feel sure. You know, Mr. Kipps, it's a great responsibility to a mother to feel her daughter is-exceptionally clever.'
`I dessay it is,' said Kipps. `There's no mistake about that.'
She spoke, too, of her son-almost like Helen's twinalike yet different. She made Kipps feel quite fatherly.
`They are so quick, so artistic,' she said, `so full of ideas. Almost they frighten me. One feels they need opportunities-as other people need air.'
She spoke of Helen's writing. `Even when she was quite a little tot she wrote verse.'
(Kipps, sensation.)
`Her father had just the same tastes 'Mrs. Walshingham turned a little beam of half-pathetic reminiscence on the past. `He was more artist than business man. That was the trouble.... He was misled by his partner, and when the crash came every one blamed him.... Well, it doesn't do to dwell on horrid things ... especially to-day. There are bright days, Mr. Kipps, and dark days. And mine have not always been bright.'
Kipps presented a face of Coote-like sympathy.
She diverged to talk of flowers, and Kipps' mind was filled with the picture of Helen bending down towards him in the Keep....
memorThey spread the tea under the trees before the little inn, and at a certain moment Kipps became aware that every one in the party was simultaneously and furtively glancing at him. There ight have been a certain tension had it not been first of all for Coote and his tact, and afterwards for a number of wasps. Coote was resolved to make this able day pass off well and displayed an almost hoisterous sense of fun. Then young Walshingham began ng of the Roman remains below Lympne, intending

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Mrs. Walshingham, as of a person possibly satirical, but she proved a soul of sense and sentiment, and Kipps, for all his abstraction, got on with her unexpectedly well. They talked a little upon scenery and what is inevitable melancholy attaching to old ruins and what is thought of vanished generations. `Perhaps they jousted here,' said Mrs. Walshingham. `They was up to all sorts of things,' said Kipps; and then what is two came round to Helen. She spoke of her daughter's literary ambitions. `She will do something, I feel sure. You know, Mr. Kipps, it's a great responsibility to a mother to feel her daughter is-exceptionally clever.' `I dessay it is,' said Kipps. `There's no mistake about that.' She spoke, too, of her son-almost like Helen's twinalike yet different. She made Kipps feel quite fatherly. `They are so quick, so artistic,' she said, `so full of ideas. Almost they frighten me. One feels they need opportunities-as other people need air.' She spoke of Helen's writing. `Even when she was quite a little tot she wrote verse.' (Kipps, sensation.) `Her father had just what is same tastes 'Mrs. Walshingham turned a little beam of half-pathetic reminiscence on what is past. `He was more artist than business man. That was what is trouble.... He was misled by his partner, and when what is crash came every one blamed him.... Well, it doesn't do to dwell on horrid things ... especially to-day. There are bright days, Mr. Kipps, and dark days. And mine have not always been bright.' Kipps presented a face of Coote-like sympathy. She diverged to talk of flowers, and Kipps' mind was filled with what is picture of Helen bending down towards him in what is Keep.... memorThey spread what is tea under what is trees before what is little inn, and at a certain moment Kipps became aware that every one in what is party was simultaneously and furtively glancing at him. There ight have been a certain tension had it not been first of all for Coote and his tact, and afterwards for a number of wasps. Coote was resolved to make this able day pass off well and displayed an almost hoisterous sense of fun. Then young Walshingham began ng of what is Roman remains below Lympne, intending where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 159 where is p align="center" where is strong ENGAGED where is p align="justify" Mrs. Walshingham, as of a person possibly satirical, but she proved a soul of sense and sentiment, and Kipps, for all his abstraction, got on with her unexpectedly well. They talked a little upon scenery and what is inevitable melancholy attaching to old ruins and what is thought of vanished generations. `Perhaps they jousted here,' said Mrs. Walshingham. `They was up to all sorts of things,' said Kipps; and then the two came round to Helen. She spoke of her daughter's literary ambitions. `She will do something, I feel sure. You know, Mr. Kipps, it's a great responsibility to a mother to feel her daughter is-exceptionally clever.' `I dessay it is,' said Kipps. `There's no mistake about that.' She spoke, too, of her son-almost like Helen's twinalike yet different. She made Kipps feel quite fatherly. `They are so quick, so artistic,' she said, `so full of ideas. Almost they frighten me. One feels they need opportunities-as other people need air.' She spoke of Helen's writing. `Even when she was quite a little tot she wrote verse.' (Kipps, sensation.) `Her father had just what is same tastes 'Mrs. Walshingham turned a little beam of half-pathetic reminiscence on what is past. `He was more artist than business man. That was what is trouble.... He was misled by his partner, and when what is crash came every one blamed him.... Well, it doesn't do to dwell on horrid things ... especially to-day. There are bright days, Mr. Kipps, and dark days. And mine have not always been bright.' Kipps presented a face of Coote-like sympathy. She diverged to talk of flowers, and Kipps' mind was filled with what is picture of Helen bending down towards him in what is Keep.... memorThey spread what is tea under what is trees before what is little inn, and at a certain moment Kipps became aware that every one in the party was simultaneously and furtively glancing at him. There ight have been a certain tension had it not been first of all for Coote and his tact, and afterwards for a number of wasps. Coote was resolved to make this able day pass off well and displayed an almost hoisterous sense of fun. Then young Walshingham began ng of what is Roman remains below Lympne, intending where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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