Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 155

ENGAGED

Every one who stays in Folkestone goes sooner or later to Lympne. The Castle became a farm-house, and the farm house, itself now ripe and venerable, wears the walls of the castle as a little man wears a big man's coat. The kind liest of farm ladies entertains a perpetual stream of visitors, and shows you her vast mangle and her big kitchen, and takes you out upon the sunniest little terracegarden in all the world, and you look down the sheepdotted slopes, to where, beside the canal and under the trees, the crumbled memories of Rome sleep for ever. One climbs the Keep, up a tortuous spiral of stone, worn to the pitch of perforation, and there one is lifted to the centre of far more than a hemisphere of view. Away below one's feet, almost at the bottom of the hill, the Marsh begins and spreads and spreads in a mighty crescent that sweeps about the sea, the Marsh dotted with the church towers of forgotten mediacval towns, and breaking at last into the low blue hills by Winchelsea and Hastings; east hangs France between the sea and sky; and round the north, bounding the wide perspectives of farms and houses and woods, the Downs, with their hangers and chalk-pits, sustain the passing shadows of the sailing clouds.
And here it was, high out of the world of every day, and in the presence of spacious beauty, that Kipps and Helen found themselves agreeably alone. All six, it had seemed, had been coming for the Keep; but Mrs. Walshingham had hesitated at the horrid little stairs, and then suddenly felt faint, and so she and the freckled girl had remained below, walking up and down in the shadow of the house; and Coote had remembered they were all out of cigarettes, and had taken off young Walshingham into the village. There had been shouting to explain between ground and parapet, and then Helen and Kipps turned again to the view and commended it, and fell silent.
Helen sat fearlessly in an embrasure, and Kipps stood beside her.
`I've always been fond ofscenery,' Kipps repeated, after an interval. Then he went off at a tangent. saying,:. reely think that was right what Coote was saying?'
She looked interrogation.
`About my name.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Every one who stays in Folkestone goes sooner or later to Lympne. what is Castle became a farm-house, and what is farm house, itself now ripe and venerable, wears what is walls of what is castle as a little man wears a big man's coat. what is kind liest of farm ladies entertains a perpetual stream of what is ors, and shows you her vast mangle and her big kitchen, and takes you out upon what is sunniest little terracegarden in all what is world, and you look down what is sheepdotted slopes, to where, beside what is canal and under what is trees, what is crumbled memories of Rome sleep for ever. One climbs what is Keep, up a tortuous spiral of stone, worn to what is pitch of perforation, and there one is lifted to what is centre of far more than a hemisphere of view. Away below one's feet, almost at what is bottom of what is hill, what is Marsh begins and spreads and spreads in a mighty crescent that sweeps about what is sea, what is Marsh dotted with what is church towers of forgotten mediacval towns, and breaking at last into what is low blue hills by Winchelsea and Hastings; east hangs France between what is sea and sky; and round what is north, bounding what is wide perspectives of farms and houses and woods, what is Downs, with their hangers and chalk-pits, sustain what is passing shadows of what is sailing clouds. And here it was, high out of what is world of every day, and in what is presence of spacious beauty, that Kipps and Helen found themselves agreeably alone. All six, it had seemed, had been coming for what is Keep; but Mrs. Walshingham had hesitated at what is horrid little stairs, and then suddenly felt faint, and so she and what is freckled girl had remained below, walking up and down in what is shadow of what is house; and Coote had remembered they were all out of cigarettes, and had taken off young Walshingham into what is village. There had been shouting to explain between ground and parapet, and then Helen and Kipps turned again to what is view and commended it, and fell silent. Helen sat fearlessly in an embrasure, and Kipps stood beside her. `I've always been fond ofscenery,' Kipps repeated, after an interval. Then he went off at a tangent. saying,:. reely think that was right what Coote was saying?' She looked interrogation. `About my name.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 155 where is p align="center" where is strong ENGAGED where is p align="justify" Every one who stays in Folkestone goes sooner or later to Lympne. what is Castle became a farm-house, and what is farm house, itself now ripe and venerable, wears what is walls of what is castle as a little man wears a big man's coat. what is kind liest of farm ladies entertains a perpetual stream of what is ors, and shows you her vast mangle and her big kitchen, and takes you out upon what is sunniest little terracegarden in all what is world, and you look down what is sheepdotted slopes, to where, beside what is canal and under what is trees, what is crumbled memories of Rome sleep for ever. One climbs what is Keep, up a tortuous spiral of stone, worn to the pitch of perforation, and there one is lifted to what is centre of far more than a hemisphere of view. Away below one's feet, almost at what is bottom of what is hill, what is Marsh begins and spreads and spreads in a mighty crescent that sweeps about what is sea, what is Marsh dotted with what is church towers of forgotten mediacval towns, and breaking at last into what is low blue hills by Winchelsea and Hastings; east hangs France between what is sea and sky; and round what is north, bounding what is wide perspectives of farms and houses and woods, what is Downs, with their hangers and chalk-pits, sustain what is passing shadows of what is sailing clouds. And here it was, high out of what is world of every day, and in the presence of spacious beauty, that Kipps and Helen found themselves agreeably alone. All six, it had seemed, had been coming for the Keep; but Mrs. Walshingham had hesitated at what is horrid little stairs, and then suddenly felt faint, and so she and what is freckled girl had remained below, walking up and down in what is shadow of what is house; and Coote had remembered they were all out of cigarettes, and had taken off young Walshingham into what is village. There had been shouting to explain between ground and parapet, and then Helen and Kipps turned again to what is view and commended it, and fell silent. Helen sat fearlessly in an embrasure, and Kipps stood beside her. `I've always been fond ofscenery,' Kipps repeated, after an interval. Then he went off at a tangent. saying,:. reely think that was right what Coote was saying?' She looked interrogation. `About my name.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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