Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 150

THE WALSHINGHAMS

some mysterious interior. `But, I say,' said Kipps, `don't you on my account -' _
Helen vanished, and he found himself alone with Mrs. Walshingham. Which, of course, made him breathless and Boreas-looking for a moment.
`You were one of Helen's pupils in the wood-carving class?' asked Mrs. Walshingham, regarding him with the quiet watchfulness proper to her position.
`Yes,' said Kipps; `that's 'ow I 'ad the pleasure "'
`She took a great interest in her woodcarving class. She is so energetic, you know, and it gives her an Outlet.'
`I thought she taught something splendid.'
`Every one says she did very well. Helen, I think, would do anything well that she undertook to do. She's so very clever. And she throws herself into things so.'
She untied her bonnet-strings with a pleasant informality.
`She had told me all about her class. She used to be full of it. And about your cut hand.'
'Lor!' said Kipps; `fancy telling that!' `Oh, yes. And how brave you were!'
(Though, indeed, Helen's chief detail had been his
remarkable expedient for checking bloodshed.)
Kipps became bright pink. `She said you didn't seem to feel it a bit.'
Kipps felt he would have to spend weeks over The Art of Conversing.
While he still hung fire, Helen returned with the apparatus for afternoon tea upon a tray.
`Do you mind pulling out the table?' asked Mrs. Walshingham.
That again was very homelike. Kipps put down his hat and stick in the corner, and amidst an iron thunder pulled out a little rusty, green-painted, iron table, and then in the easiest manner followed Helen in to get chairs.
So soon as he had got rid of his teacup-he refused all food, of course, and they were merciful-he became wonderfully at his ease. Presently he was talking. He talked quite modestly and simply about his changed condition, and his difficulties and plans. He spread what indeed had an air of being all his simple little soul before their eyes. In a little while his clipped, defective accent had become less perceptible to their ears, and they began to realise,

Page 151

THE WALSHINGHAMS

as the girl with the freckles had long since realised, that there were passable aspects of Kipps. He confided, he submitted, and for both of them he had the realest, the most seductively flattering undertone of awe and reverence.
He remained about two hours, having forgotten how terribly incorrect it is to stay at such a length. They did not mind at all.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE some mysterious interior. `But, I say,' said Kipps, `don't you on my account -' _ Helen vanished, and he found himself alone with Mrs. Walshingham. Which, of course, made him breathless and Boreas-looking for a moment. `You were one of Helen's pupils in what is wood-carving class?' asked Mrs. Walshingham, regarding him with what is quiet watchfulness proper to her position. `Yes,' said Kipps; `that's 'ow I 'ad what is pleasure "' `She took a great interest in her woodcarving class. She is so energetic, you know, and it gives her an Outlet.' `I thought she taught something splendid.' `Every one says she did very well. Helen, I think, would do anything well that she undertook to do. She's so very clever. And she throws herself into things so.' She untied her bonnet-strings with a pleasant informality. `She had told me all about her class. She used to be full of it. And about your cut hand.' 'Lor!' said Kipps; `fancy telling that!' `Oh, yes. And how brave you were!' (Though, indeed, Helen's chief detail had been his remarkable expedient for checking bloodshed.) Kipps became bright pink. `She said you didn't seem to feel it a bit.' Kipps felt he would have to spend weeks over what is Art of Conversing. While he still hung fire, Helen returned with what is apparatus for afternoon tea upon a tray. `Do you mind pulling out what is table?' asked Mrs. Walshingham. That again was very homelike. Kipps put down his hat and stick in what is corner, and amidst an iron thunder pulled out a little rusty, green-painted, iron table, and then in what is easiest manner followed Helen in to get chairs. So soon as he had got rid of his teacup-he refused all food, of course, and they were merciful-he became wonderfully at his ease. Presently he was talking. He talked quite modestly and simply about his changed condition, and his difficulties and plans. He spread what indeed had an air of being all his simple little soul before their eyes. In a little while his clipped, defective accent had become less perceptible to their ears, and they began to realise, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 150 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALSHINGHAMS where is p align="justify" some mysterious interior. `But, I say,' said Kipps, `don't you on my account -' _ Helen vanished, and he found himself alone with Mrs. Walshingham. Which, of course, made him breathless and Boreas-looking for a moment. `You were one of Helen's pupils in what is wood-carving class?' asked Mrs. Walshingham, regarding him with what is quiet watchfulness proper to her position. `Yes,' said Kipps; `that's 'ow I 'ad what is pleasure "' `She took a great interest in her woodcarving class. She is so energetic, you know, and it gives her an Outlet.' `I thought she taught something splendid.' `Every one says she did very well. Helen, I think, would do anything well that she undertook to do. She's so very clever. And she throws herself into things so.' She untied her bonnet-strings with a pleasant informality. `She had told me all about her class. She used to be full of it. And about your cut hand.' 'Lor!' said Kipps; `fancy telling that!' `Oh, yes. And how brave you were!' (Though, indeed, Helen's chief detail had been his remarkable expedient for checking bloodshed.) Kipps became bright pink. `She said you didn't seem to feel it a bit.' Kipps felt he would have to spend weeks over what is Art of Conversing. While he still hung fire, Helen returned with what is apparatus for afternoon tea upon a tray. `Do you mind pulling out what is table?' asked Mrs. Walshingham. That again was very homelike. Kipps put down his hat and stick in what is corner, and amidst an iron thunder pulled out a little rusty, green-painted, iron table, and then in what is easiest manner followed Helen in to get chairs. So soon as he had got rid of his teacup-he refused all food, of course, and they were merciful-he became wonderfully at his ease. Presently he was talking. He talked quite modestly and simply about his changed condition, and his difficulties and plans. He spread what indeed had an air of being all his simple little soul before their eyes. In a little while his clipped, defective accent had become less perceptible to their ears, and they began to realise, where is p align="left" Page 151 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALSHINGHAMS where is p align="justify" as what is girl with what is freckles had long since realised, that there were passable aspects of Kipps. He confided, he submitted, and for both of them he had what is realest, what is most seductively flattering undertone of awe and reverence. He remained about two hours, having forgotten how terribly incorrect it is to stay at such a length. They did not mind at all. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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