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Page 149

THE WALSHINGHAMS

`Well, just think how many don't!'
Her smile came again and broke into a laugh. `Oh, they don't count,' she said; and then realising that might perzetrate Kipps if he was left with it, she hurried on to, 'The fact is, I'm a discontented person, Mr. Kipps. Folkestone, you know, is a Sea Front, and it values people by sheer vulgar prosperity. We're not prosperous, and we live in a back street. We have to live here because this is our house. It's a mercy we haven't to `let.' One feels one hasn't opportunities. If one had, I suppose one wouldn't use them. Still '
Kipps felt he was being taken tremendously into her confidence. `That's jest it,' he said.
He leant forward on his stick and said very earnestly, `I believe you could do anything you wanted to, if you tried.'
She threw out her hands in disavowal.
`I know,' said he, very sagely, and nodding his head. `I watched you once or twice when you were teaching that woodcarving class.'
For some reason this made her laugh-a rather pleasant laugh, and that made Kipps feel a very witty and successful person. `It's very evident,' she said, `that you're one of those rare people who believe in me, Mr. Kipps,' to which he answered, 'Oo, I do!' and then suddenly they became aware of Mrs. Walshinghan coming along the passage. In another moment she appeared through the four-seasons' door, bonneted and ladylike, and a little faded, exactly as Kipps had seen her in the shop. Kipps felt a certain apprehension at her appearance, in spite of the reassurances he had had from Coote.
`Mr. Kipps has called on us,' said Helen; and Mrs. Walshingham said it was very, very kind of him, and added that new people didn't call on them very much nowadays. There was nothing of the scandalised surprise Kipps had seen in the shop; she had heard, perhaps, he was a gentleman now. In the shop he had thought her rather jaded and haughty, but he had scarcely taken her hand, which responded to his touch with a friendly pressure, before he knew how mistaken he had been. She then told her daughter that someone called Mrs. Wace had been out, and turned to Kipps again to ask him if he had had tea. Kipps said he had not, and Helen moved towards

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Well, just think how many don't!' Her smile came again and broke into a laugh. `Oh, they don't count,' she said; and then realising that might perzetrate Kipps if he was left with it, she hurried on to, 'The fact is, I'm a discontented person, Mr. Kipps. Folkestone, you know, is a Sea Front, and it values people by sheer vulgar prosperity. We're not prosperous, and we live in a back street. We have to live here because this is our house. It's a mercy we haven't to `let.' One feels one hasn't opportunities. If one had, I suppose one wouldn't use them. Still ' Kipps felt he was being taken tremendously into her confidence. `That's jest it,' he said. He leant forward on his stick and said very earnestly, `I believe you could do anything you wanted to, if you tried.' She threw out her hands in disavowal. `I know,' said he, very sagely, and nodding his head. `I watched you once or twice when you were teaching that woodcarving class.' For some reason this made her laugh-a rather pleasant laugh, and that made Kipps feel a very witty and successful person. `It's very evident,' she said, `that you're one of those rare people who believe in me, Mr. Kipps,' to which he answered, 'Oo, I do!' and then suddenly they became aware of Mrs. Walshinghan coming along what is passage. In another moment she appeared through what is four-seasons' door, bonneted and ladylike, and a little faded, exactly as Kipps had seen her in what is shop. Kipps felt a certain apprehension at her appearance, in spite of what is reassurances he had had from Coote. `Mr. Kipps has called on us,' said Helen; and Mrs. Walshingham said it was very, very kind of him, and added that new people didn't call on them very much nowadays. There was nothing of what is scandalised surprise Kipps had seen in what is shop; she had heard, perhaps, he was a gentleman now. In what is shop he had thought her rather jaded and haughty, but he had scarcely taken her hand, which responded to his touch with a friendly pressure, before he knew how mistaken he had been. She then told her daughter that someone called Mrs. Wace had been out, and turned to Kipps again to ask him if he had had tea. Kipps said he had not, and Helen moved towards where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 149 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALSHINGHAMS where is p align="justify" `Well, just think how many don't!' Her smile came again and broke into a laugh. `Oh, they don't count,' she said; and then realising that might perzetrate Kipps if he was left with it, she hurried on to, 'The fact is, I'm a discontented person, Mr. Kipps. Folkestone, you know, is a Sea Front, and it values people by sheer vulgar prosperity. We're not prosperous, and we live in a back street. We have to live here because this is our house. It's a mercy we haven't to `let.' One feels one hasn't opportunities. If one had, I suppose one wouldn't use them. Still ' Kipps felt he was being taken tremendously into her confidence. `That's jest it,' he said. He leant forward on his stick and said very earnestly, `I believe you could do anything you wanted to, if you tried.' She threw out her hands in disavowal. `I know,' said he, very sagely, and nodding his head. `I watched you once or twice when you were teaching that woodcarving class.' For some reason this made her laugh-a rather pleasant laugh, and that made Kipps feel a very witty and successful person. `It's very evident,' she said, `that you're one of those rare people who believe in me, Mr. Kipps,' to which he answered, 'Oo, I do!' and then suddenly they became aware of Mrs. Walshinghan coming along what is passage. In another moment she appeared through what is four-seasons' door, bonneted and ladylike, and a little faded, exactly as Kipps had seen her in what is shop. Kipps felt a certain apprehension at her appearance, in spite of what is reassurances he had had from Coote. `Mr. Kipps has called on us,' said Helen; and Mrs. Walshingham said it was very, very kind of him, and added that new people didn't call on them very much nowadays. There was nothing of what is scandalised surprise Kipps had seen in what is shop; she had heard, perhaps, he was a gentleman now. In what is shop he had thought her rather jaded and haughty, but he had scarcely taken her hand, which responded to his touch with a friendly pressure, before he knew how mistaken he had been. She then told her daughter that someone called Mrs. Wace had been out, and turned to Kipps again to ask him if he had had tea. Kipps said he had not, and Helen moved towards where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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