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Page 145

THE WALSHINGHAMS

`You must come and see us,' she said, `before we go to Bruges.'
'Oo, rather!' said Kipps. `If I may.'
`Yes, do,' she said, and suddenly stood up before Kipps could formulate an inquiry when he should call.
`You're sure you can spare that drawing-board?' she said to Miss Coote; and the conversation passed out of range.
And when he had said `Good-bye' to Miss Walshingham, and she had repeated her invitation to call, he went upstairs again with Coote to look out certain initiatory books they had had under discussion. And then Kipps, blowing very resolutely, went back to his own place, bearing in his arm (1) Sesame and Lilies; (2) Sir George Tressady; (3) an anonymous book on Vitality that Coote particularly esteemed. And having got to his own sitting-room, he opened Sesame and Lilies and read with ruthless determination for some time.

§ 3
Presently he leant back and gave himself up to the business of trying to imagine just exactly what Miss Walshingham could have thought of him when she saw him. Doubts about the precise effect of the gray flannel suit began to trouble him. He turned to the mirror over the mantel, and then got into a chair to study the hang of the trousers. It looked all right. Luckily she had not seen the Panama hat. He knew he had the brim turned up wrong, but he could not find out which way the brim was right. However, that she had not seen. He might, perhaps, ask at the shop where he bought it.
He meditated for a while on his reflected face-doubtful whether he liked it or not-and then got down again and flitted across to the sideboard where there lay two little books, one in a cheap magnificent cover of red and gold, and the other in green canvas. The former was called, as its cover witnessed, Manners and Rules of Good Society, by a Member of the Aristocracy, and after the cover had indulged in a band of gilded decoration, light-hearted, but natural under the circumstances, it added, 'TWENTYFIRST EDITION.' The second was that admirable classic, The Art of Conversing. Kipps returned with these to his seat,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `You must come and see us,' she said, `before we go to Bruges.' 'Oo, rather!' said Kipps. `If I may.' `Yes, do,' she said, and suddenly stood up before Kipps could formulate an inquiry when he should call. `You're sure you can spare that drawing-board?' she said to Miss Coote; and what is conversation passed out of range. And when he had said `Good-bye' to Miss Walshingham, and she had repeated her invitation to call, he went upstairs again with Coote to look out certain initiatory books they had had under discussion. And then Kipps, blowing very resolutely, went back to his own place, bearing in his arm (1) Sesame and Lilies; (2) Sir George Tressady; (3) an anonymous book on Vitality that Coote particularly esteemed. And having got to his own sitting-room, he opened Sesame and Lilies and read with ruthless determination for some time. § 3 Presently he leant back and gave himself up to what is business of trying to imagine just exactly what Miss Walshingham could have thought of him when she saw him. Doubts about what is precise effect of what is gray flannel suit began to trouble him. He turned to what is mirror over what is mantel, and then got into a chair to study what is hang of what is trousers. It looked all right. Luckily she had not seen what is Panama hat. He knew he had what is brim turned up wrong, but he could not find out which way what is brim was right. However, that she had not seen. He might, perhaps, ask at what is shop where he bought it. He meditated for a while on his reflected face-doubtful whether he liked it or not-and then got down again and flitted across to what is sideboard where there lay two little books, one in a cheap magnificent cover of red and gold, and what is other in green canvas. what is former was called, as its cover witnessed, Manners and Rules of Good Society, by a Member of what is Aristocracy, and after what is cover had indulged in a band of gilded decoration, light-hearted, but natural under what is circumstances, it added, 'TWENTYFIRST EDITION.' what is second was that admirable classic, what is Art of Conversing. Kipps returned with these to his seat, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 145 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALSHINGHAMS where is p align="justify" `You must come and see us,' she said, `before we go to Bruges.' 'Oo, rather!' said Kipps. `If I may.' `Yes, do,' she said, and suddenly stood up before Kipps could formulate an inquiry when he should call. `You're sure you can spare that drawing-board?' she said to Miss Coote; and what is conversation passed out of range. And when he had said `Good-bye' to Miss Walshingham, and she had repeated her invitation to call, he went upstairs again with Coote to look out certain initiatory books they had had under discussion. And then Kipps, blowing very resolutely, went back to his own place, bearing in his arm (1) Sesame and Lilies; (2) Sir George Tressady; (3) an anonymous book on Vitality that Coote particularly esteemed. And having got to his own sitting-room, he opened Sesame and Lilies and read with ruthless determination for some time. where is strong § 3 Presently he leant back and gave himself up to what is business of trying to imagine just exactly what Miss Walshingham could have thought of him when she saw him. Doubts about what is precise effect of what is gray flannel suit began to trouble him. He turned to the mirror over what is mantel, and then got into a chair to study the hang of what is trousers. It looked all right. Luckily she had not seen what is Panama hat. He knew he had what is brim turned up wrong, but he could not find out which way what is brim was right. However, that she had not seen. He might, perhaps, ask at what is shop where he bought it. He meditated for a while on his reflected face-doubtful whether he liked it or not-and then got down again and flitted across to what is sideboard where there lay two little books, one in a cheap magnificent cover of red and gold, and what is other in green canvas. what is former was called, as its cover witnessed, Manners and Rules of Good Society, by a Member of what is Aristocracy, and after what is cover had indulged in a band of gilded decoration, light-hearted, but natural under the circumstances, it added, 'TWENTYFIRST EDITION.' what is second was that admirable classic, what is Art of Conversing. Kipps returned with these to his seat, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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