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Page 144

THE WALSHINGHAMS

took milk and sugar. `I don't mind,' said Kipps. `Jest as you like.'
Coote became active, handing tea and bread-andbutter. It was thinly cut, and the bread was rather new, and the half of the slice that Kipps took fell upon the floor. He had been holding it by the edge, for he was not used to this migratory method of taking tea without plates or table. This little incident ruled him out of the conversation for a time, and when he came to attend to it again, they were talking about something or other prodigious-a performer of some sort-that was coming, called, it seemed, `Padrooski !' So Kipps, who had dropped quietly into a chair, ate his bread-and-butter, said `no, thank you' to any more, and by this discreet restraint got more freedom with his cup and saucer.
Apart from the confusion natural to tea, he was in a state of tremulous excitement on account of the presence of Miss Walshingham. He glanced from Miss Coote to her brother, and then at Helen. He regarded her over the top of his cup as he drank. Here she was, solid and real. It was wonderful. He remarked, as he had done at times before, the easy flow of the dark hair back from her brow over her ears, the shapeliness of the white hands that came out from her simple white cuffs, the delicate pencilling of her brow.
Presently she turned her face to him almost suddenly, and smiled with the easiest assurance of friendship.
`You will go, I suppose?' she said, and added `to the Recital.'
`If I'm in Folkestone I shall,' said Kipps, clearing away a little hoarseness. `I don't know much about music, but what I do know I like.'
`I'm sure you'll like Paderewski,' she said.
`If you do,' he said, `I dessay I shall.'
He found Coote very kindly taking his cup.
`Do you think of living in Folkestone?' asked Miss Coote in a tone of proprietorship from the hearthrug.
`No,' said Kipps, `That's jest it-I hardly know.' He also said that he wanted to look round a bit before doing anything. `There's so much to consider,' said Coote, smoothing the back of his head.
`I may go back to New Romney for a bit,' said Kipps. `I got an uncle and aunt there. I reely don't know.'
Helen regarded him thoughtfully for a moment.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE took milk and sugar. `I don't mind,' said Kipps. `Jest as you like.' Coote became active, handing tea and bread-andbutter. It was thinly cut, and what is bread was rather new, and what is half of what is slice that Kipps took fell upon what is floor. He had been holding it by what is edge, for he was not used to this migratory method of taking tea without plates or table. This little incident ruled him out of what is conversation for a time, and when he came to attend to it again, they were talking about something or other prodigious-a performer of some sort-that was coming, called, it seemed, `Padrooski !' So Kipps, who had dropped quietly into a chair, ate his bread-and-butter, said `no, thank you' to any more, and by this discreet restraint got more freedom with his cup and saucer. Apart from what is confusion natural to tea, he was in a state of tremulous excitement on account of what is presence of Miss Walshingham. He glanced from Miss Coote to her brother, and then at Helen. He regarded her over what is top of his cup as he drank. Here she was, solid and real. It was wonderful. He remarked, as he had done at times before, what is easy flow of what is dark hair back from her brow over her ears, what is shapeliness of what is white hands that came out from her simple white cuffs, what is delicate pencilling of her brow. Presently she turned her face to him almost suddenly, and smiled with what is easiest assurance of friendship. `You will go, I suppose?' she said, and added `to what is Recital.' `If I'm in Folkestone I shall,' said Kipps, clearing away a little hoarseness. `I don't know much about music, but what I do know I like.' `I'm sure you'll like Paderewski,' she said. `If you do,' he said, `I dessay I shall.' He found Coote very kindly taking his cup. `Do you think of living in Folkestone?' asked Miss Coote in a tone of proprietorship from what is hearthrug. `No,' said Kipps, `That's jest it-I hardly know.' He also said that he wanted to look round a bit before doing anything. `There's so much to consider,' said Coote, smoothing what is back of his head. `I may go back to New Romney for a bit,' said Kipps. `I got an uncle and aunt there. I reely don't know.' Helen regarded him thoughtfully for a moment. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 144 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALSHINGHAMS where is p align="justify" took milk and sugar. `I don't mind,' said Kipps. `Jest as you like.' Coote became active, handing tea and bread-andbutter. It was thinly cut, and what is bread was rather new, and what is half of what is slice that Kipps took fell upon what is floor. He had been holding it by what is edge, for he was not used to this migratory method of taking tea without plates or table. This little incident ruled him out of what is conversation for a time, and when he came to attend to it again, they were talking about something or other prodigious-a performer of some sort-that was coming, called, it seemed, `Padrooski !' So Kipps, who had dropped quietly into a chair, ate his bread-and-butter, said `no, thank you' to any more, and by this discreet restraint got more freedom with his cup and saucer. Apart from what is confusion natural to tea, he was in a state of tremulous excitement on account of what is presence of Miss Walshingham. He glanced from Miss Coote to her brother, and then at Helen. He regarded her over what is top of his cup as he drank. Here she was, solid and real. It was wonderful. He remarked, as he had done at times before, what is easy flow of what is dark hair back from her brow over her ears, what is shapeliness of what is white hands that came out from her simple white cuffs, what is delicate pencilling of her brow. Presently she turned her face to him almost suddenly, and smiled with what is easiest assurance of friendship. `You will go, I suppose?' she said, and added `to what is Recital.' `If I'm in Folkestone I shall,' said Kipps, clearing away a little hoarseness. `I don't know much about music, but what I do know I like.' `I'm sure you'll like Paderewski,' she said. `If you do,' he said, `I dessay I shall.' He found Coote very kindly taking his cup. `Do you think of living in Folkestone?' asked Miss Coote in a tone of proprietorship from what is hearthrug. `No,' said Kipps, `That's jest it-I hardly know.' He also said that he wanted to look round a bit before doing anything. `There's so much to consider,' said Coote, smoothing what is back of his head. `I may go back to New Romney for a bit,' said Kipps. `I got an uncle and aunt there. I reely don't know.' Helen regarded him thoughtfully for a moment. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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