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Page 143

THE WALSHINGHAMS

`Nothing enlarges the mind,' said Coote, `like Travel and Books.... And they're both so easy nowadays, and so cheap!'
`I've often wanted to 'ave a good go in at reading,' Kipps replied.
`You'd hardly believe,' Coote said, `how much you can get out of books. Provided you avoid trashy reading, that is. You ought to make a rule, Kipps, and read one Serious Book a week. Of course we can Learn even from Novels, Nace Novels, that is, but it isn't the same thing as serious reading. I made a rule, One Serious Book and One Novel -no more. There's some of the Serious Books I've been reading lately-on that table: Sartor Resartus, Mrs. Twaddletome's Pond Life, The Scottish Chiefs, Life and Letters of Dean Farrar. . . .'

§ 2
There came at last the sound of a gong, and Kipps descended to tea in that state of nervous apprehension at the difficulties of eating and drinking that his aunt's knuckle rappings had implanted in him for ever. Over Coote's shoulder he became aware of a fourth person in the Moorish cosy corner, and he turned, leaving incomplete something incoherent he was saying to Miss Coote about his modest respect and desire for literature, to discover this fourth person was Miss Helen Walshingham, hatless, and looking very much at home.
She rose at once with an extended hand to meet his hesitation.
`You're stopping in Folkestone, Mr. Kipps?'
" Ere on a bit of business,' said Kipps. `I thought you was away in Bruges.'
`That's later,' said Miss Walshingham. `We're stopping until my brother's holiday begins, and we're trying to let our house. Where are you staying in Folkestone?'
`I got a 'ouse of mine-on the Leas.'
`I've heard all about your good fortune-this afternoon.
`Isn't it a Go!' said Kipps. `I 'aven't nearly got to believe it's reely 'appened yet. When that Mr. Bean told me of it, you could 'ave knocked me down with a feather. . It's a tremenjous change for me.'
He discovered Miss Coote was asking him whether he

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Nothing enlarges what is mind,' said Coote, `like Travel and Books.... And they're both so easy nowadays, and so cheap!' `I've often wanted to 'ave a good go in at reading,' Kipps replied. `You'd hardly believe,' Coote said, `how much you can get out of books. Provided you avoid trashy reading, that is. You ought to make a rule, Kipps, and read one Serious Book a week. Of course we can Learn even from Novels, Nace Novels, that is, but it isn't what is same thing as serious reading. I made a rule, One Serious Book and One Novel -no more. There's some of what is Serious Books I've been reading lately-on that table: Sartor Resartus, Mrs. Twaddletome's Pond Life, what is Scottish Chiefs, Life and Letters of Dean Farrar. . . .' § 2 There came at last what is sound of a gong, and Kipps descended to tea in that state of nervous apprehension at what is difficulties of eating and drinking that his aunt's knuckle rappings had implanted in him for ever. Over Coote's shoulder he became aware of a fourth person in what is Moorish cosy corner, and he turned, leaving incomplete something incoherent he was saying to Miss Coote about his modest respect and desire for literature, to discover this fourth person was Miss Helen Walshingham, hatless, and looking very much at home. She rose at once with an extended hand to meet his hesitation. `You're stopping in Folkestone, Mr. Kipps?' " Ere on a bit of business,' said Kipps. `I thought you was away in Bruges.' `That's later,' said Miss Walshingham. `We're stopping until my brother's holiday begins, and we're trying to let our house. Where are you staying in Folkestone?' `I got a 'ouse of mine-on what is Leas.' `I've heard all about your good fortune-this afternoon. `Isn't it a Go!' said Kipps. `I 'aven't nearly got to believe it's reely 'appened yet. When that Mr. Bean told me of it, you could 'ave knocked me down with a feather. . It's a tremenjous change for me.' He discovered Miss Coote was asking him whether he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 143 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALSHINGHAMS where is p align="justify" `Nothing enlarges what is mind,' said Coote, `like Travel and Books.... And they're both so easy nowadays, and so cheap!' `I've often wanted to 'ave a good go in at reading,' Kipps replied. `You'd hardly believe,' Coote said, `how much you can get out of books. Provided you avoid trashy reading, that is. You ought to make a rule, Kipps, and read one Serious Book a week. Of course we can Learn even from Novels, Nace Novels, that is, but it isn't what is same thing as serious reading. I made a rule, One Serious Book and One Novel -no more. There's some of what is Serious Books I've been reading lately-on that table: Sartor Resartus, Mrs. Twaddletome's Pond Life, what is Scottish Chiefs, Life and Letters of Dean Farrar. . . .' where is strong § 2 There came at last what is sound of a gong, and Kipps descended to tea in that state of nervous apprehension at what is difficulties of eating and drinking that his aunt's knuckle rappings had implanted in him for ever. Over Coote's shoulder he became aware of a fourth person in what is Moorish cosy corner, and he turned, leaving incomplete something incoherent he was saying to Miss Coote about his modest respect and desire for literature, to discover this fourth person was Miss Helen Walshingham, hatless, and looking very much at home. She rose at once with an extended hand to meet his hesitation. `You're stopping in Folkestone, Mr. Kipps?' " Ere on a bit of business,' said Kipps. `I thought you was away in Bruges.' `That's later,' said Miss Walshingham. `We're stopping until my brother's holiday begins, and we're trying to let our house. Where are you staying in Folkestone?' `I got a 'ouse of mine-on what is Leas.' `I've heard all about your good fortune-this afternoon. `Isn't it a Go!' said Kipps. `I 'aven't nearly got to believe it's reely 'appened yet. When that Mr. Bean told me of it, you could 'ave knocked me down with a feather. . It's a tremenjous change for me.' He discovered Miss Coote was asking him whether he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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