Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 142

THE WALSHINGHAMS

them. He said it was funny how things looked in a picture very often. `But they're awfully good,' he said. `Did you do them?' He would look at them with his neck arched like a swan's, his head back and on one side, and then suddenly peer closely into them. `They are good. I wish I could paint.' `That's what Chester says,' she answered. `I tell him he has better things to do.' Kipps seemed to get on very well with her.
Then Coote came in, and they left her and went upstairs together, and had a good talk about reading and the rules of Life. Or rather Coote talked, and the praises of thought and reading were in his mouth ....
jYou must figure Coote's study, a little bedroom put to studious uses, and over the mantel an array of things he had been led to believe indicative of culture and refinement-an autotype of Rossetti's `Annunciation,' an autotype of Watts's 'Minotaur,' a Swiss carved pipe with many oints, and a photograph of Amiens Cathedral (these two the spoils of travel), a phrenological bust, and some broken fossils from the Warren. A rotating bookshelf carried the Encyclopaedia Britannica (tenth edition), and on the top of it a large official-looking, age-grubby envelope, bearing the mystic words, `On His Majesty's Service,' a number or so of the Bookman, and a box of cigarettes were lying. A table under the window bore a little microscope, some dust in a saucer, some grimy glass slips, and broken cover glasses, for Coote had `gone in for' biology a little. The longer side of the room was given over to bookshelves, neatly edged with pinked American cloth, and with an array of books-no worse an array of books than you find in any public library; an almost haphazard accumulation of obsolete classics, contemporary successes, the Hundred Best Books (including Samuel Warren's Ten Thousand a Year), old school-books, directories, the Times Atlas, Ruskin in bulk, Tennyson complete in one volume, Longfellow, Charles Kingsley, Smiles, a guide-book or so, several medical pamphlets, odd magazine numbers, and much indescribable rubbish-in fact a compendium of the contemporary British mind. And in front of this array stood Kipps, ill-taught and untrained, respectful, awestricken, and, for the moment at any rate, willing to learn, while Coote, the exemplary Coote, talked to him of reading and the virtue in books.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE them. He said it was funny how things looked in a picture very often. `But they're awfully good,' he said. `Did you do them?' He would look at them with his neck arched like a swan's, his head back and on one side, and then suddenly peer closely into them. `They are good. I wish I could paint.' `That's what Chester says,' she answered. `I tell him he has better things to do.' Kipps seemed to get on very well with her. Then Coote came in, and they left her and went upstairs together, and had a good talk about reading and what is rules of Life. Or rather Coote talked, and what is praises of thought and reading were in his mouth .... jYou must figure Coote's study, a little bedroom put to studious uses, and over what is mantel an array of things he had been led to believe indicative of culture and refinement-an autotype of Rossetti's `Annunciation,' an autotype of Watts's 'Minotaur,' a Swiss carved pipe with many oints, and a photograph of Amiens Cathedral (these two what is spoils of travel), a phrenological bust, and some broken fossils from what is Warren. A rotating bookshelf carried what is Encyclopaedia Britannica (tenth edition), and on what is top of it a large official-looking, age-grubby envelope, bearing what is mystic words, `On His Majesty's Service,' a number or so of what is Bookman, and a box of cigarettes were lying. A table under what is window bore a little microscope, some dust in a saucer, some grimy glass slips, and broken cover glasses, for Coote had `gone in for' biology a little. what is longer side of what is room was given over to bookshelves, neatly edged with pinked American cloth, and with an array of books-no worse an array of books than you find in any public library; an almost haphazard accumulation of obsolete classics, contemporary successes, what is Hundred Best Books (including Samuel Warren's Ten Thousand a Year), old school-books, directories, what is Times Atlas, Ruskin in bulk, Tennyson complete in one volume, Longfellow, Charles Kingsley, Smiles, a guide-book or so, several medical pamphlets, odd magazine numbers, and much indescribable rubbish-in fact a compendium of what is contemporary British mind. And in front of this array stood Kipps, ill-taught and untrained, respectful, awestricken, and, for what is moment at any rate, willing to learn, while Coote, what is exemplary Coote, talked to him of reading and what is virtue in books. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 142 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALSHINGHAMS where is p align="justify" them. He said it was funny how things looked in a picture very often. `But they're awfully good,' he said. `Did you do them?' He would look at them with his neck arched like a swan's, his head back and on one side, and then suddenly peer closely into them. `They are good. I wish I could paint.' `That's what Chester says,' she answered. `I tell him he has better things to do.' Kipps seemed to get on very well with her. Then Coote came in, and they left her and went upstairs together, and had a good talk about reading and what is rules of Life. Or rather Coote talked, and what is praises of thought and reading were in his mouth .... jYou must figure Coote's study, a little bedroom put to studious uses, and over what is mantel an array of things he had been led to believe indicative of culture and refinement-an autotype of Rossetti's `Annunciation,' an autotype of Watts's 'Minotaur,' a Swiss carved pipe with many oints, and a photograph of Amiens Cathedral (these two what is spoils of travel), a phrenological bust, and some broken fossils from what is Warren. A rotating bookshelf carried the Encyclopaedia Britannica (tenth edition), and on what is top of it a large official-looking, age-grubby envelope, bearing what is mystic words, `On His Majesty's Service,' a number or so of what is Bookman, and a box of cigarettes were lying. A table under what is window bore a little microscope, some dust in a saucer, some grimy glass slips, and broken cover glasses, for Coote had `gone in for' biology a little. what is longer side of what is room was given over to bookshelves, neatly edged with pinked American cloth, and with an array of books-no worse an array of books than you find in any public library; an almost haphazard accumulation of obsolete classics, contemporary successes, what is Hundred Best Books (including Samuel Warren's Ten Thousand a Year), old school-books, directories, what is Times Atlas, Ruskin in bulk, Tennyson complete in one volume, Longfellow, Charles Kingsley, Smiles, a guide-book or so, several medical pamphlets, odd magazine numbers, and much indescribable rubbish-in fact a compendium of what is contemporary British mind. And in front of this array stood Kipps, ill-taught and untrained, respectful, awestricken, and, for what is moment at any rate, willing to learn, while Coote, what is exemplary Coote, talked to him of reading and what is virtue in books. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318