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Page 139

THE NEW CONDITIONS

the first Kipps was aware that she possessed a warm and rounded neck, and her well-moulded arms carne and vanished from the sleeves-and she had large expressive eyes, that he discovered ever and again fixed in an enigmatical manner upon his own.
A simple but sufficient meal had been distributed with careless spontaneity over the little round table in the room with the photographs and looking-glass, and when a plate had, by Chitterlow's direction, been taken from under the marmalade in the cupboard, and the kitchen fork and a knife that was not loose in its handle had been found for Kipps, they began and made a tumultuous repast. Chitterlow ate with quiet enormity, but it did not interfere with the flow of this talk. He introduced Kipps to his wife very briefly; she had obviously heard of Kipps before, and he made it vaguely evident that the production of the comedy was the thing chiefly settled. His reach extended over the table, and he troubled nobody. When Mrs. Chitterlow, who for a little while seemed socially self-conscious, reproved him for taking a potato with a jab of his fork, he answered, `Well, you shouldn't have married a man of Genius,' and from a subsequent remark it was perfectly clear that Chitterlow's standing in this respect was made no secret of in his household.
They drank old Methuselah and siphon soda, and there was no clearing away; they just sat among the plates and things, and Mrs. Chitterlow took her husband's tobaccopouch and made a cigarette and smoked and blew smoke, and looked at Kipps with her large brown eyes. Kipps had seen cigarettes smoked by ladies before, for fun, but this was real smoking. It frightened him rather. He felt he must not encourage this lady-at any rate in Chitterlow's presence.
They became very cheerful after the repast, and as there was now no waste to deplore, such as one experiences in the windy open air, Chitterlow gave his voice full vent. He fell to praising Kipps very highly and loudly. He said he had known Kipps was the right sort, he had seen it from the first, almost before he got up out of the mud on that memorable night. `You can,' he said, `sometimes. That was why ' He stopped, but he seemed on the verge of explaining that it was his certainty of Kipps being the right sort had led him to confer this great Fortune

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the first Kipps was aware that she possessed a warm and rounded neck, and her well-moulded arms carne and vanished from what is sleeves-and she had large expressive eyes, that he discovered ever and again fixed in an enigmatical manner upon his own. A simple but sufficient meal had been distributed with careless spontaneity over what is little round table in what is room with what is photographs and looking-glass, and when a plate had, by Chitterlow's direction, been taken from under what is marmalade in what is cupboard, and what is kitchen fork and a knife that was not loose in its handle had been found for Kipps, they began and made a tumultuous repast. Chitterlow ate with quiet enormity, but it did not interfere with what is flow of this talk. He introduced Kipps to his wife very briefly; she had obviously heard of Kipps before, and he made it vaguely evident that what is production of what is comedy was what is thing chiefly settled. His reach extended over what is table, and he troubled nobody. When Mrs. Chitterlow, who for a little while seemed socially self-conscious, reproved him for taking a potato with a jab of his fork, he answered, `Well, you shouldn't have married a man of Genius,' and from a subsequent remark it was perfectly clear that Chitterlow's standing in this respect was made no secret of in his household. They drank old Methuselah and siphon soda, and there was no clearing away; they just sat among what is plates and things, and Mrs. Chitterlow took her husband's tobaccopouch and made a cigarette and smoked and blew smoke, and looked at Kipps with her large brown eyes. Kipps had seen cigarettes smoked by ladies before, for fun, but this was real smoking. It frightened him rather. He felt he must not encourage this lady-at any rate in Chitterlow's presence. They became very cheerful after what is repast, and as there was now no waste to deplore, such as one experiences in what is windy open air, Chitterlow gave his voice full vent. He fell to praising Kipps very highly and loudly. He said he had known Kipps was what is right sort, he had seen it from what is first, almost before he got up out of what is mud on that memorable night. `You can,' he said, `sometimes. That was why ' He stopped, but he seemed on what is verge of explaining that it was his certainty of Kipps being what is right sort had led him to confer this great Fortune where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 139 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" the first Kipps was aware that she possessed a warm and rounded neck, and her well-moulded arms carne and vanished from what is sleeves-and she had large expressive eyes, that he discovered ever and again fixed in an enigmatical manner upon his own. A simple but sufficient meal had been distributed with careless spontaneity over what is little round table in what is room with what is photographs and looking-glass, and when a plate had, by Chitterlow's direction, been taken from under what is marmalade in what is cupboard, and what is kitchen fork and a knife that was not loose in its handle had been found for Kipps, they began and made a tumultuous repast. Chitterlow ate with quiet enormity, but it did not interfere with what is flow of this talk. He introduced Kipps to his wife very briefly; she had obviously heard of Kipps before, and he made it vaguely evident that what is production of what is comedy was what is thing chiefly settled. His reach extended over what is table, and he troubled nobody. When Mrs. Chitterlow, who for a little while seemed socially self-conscious, reproved him for taking a potato with a jab of his fork, he answered, `Well, you shouldn't have married a man of Genius,' and from a subsequent remark it was perfectly clear that Chitterlow's standing in this respect was made no secret of in his household. They drank old Methuselah and siphon soda, and there was no clearing away; they just sat among what is plates and things, and Mrs. Chitterlow took her husband's tobaccopouch and made a cigarette and smoked and blew smoke, and looked at Kipps with her large brown eyes. Kipps had seen cigarettes smoked by ladies before, for fun, but this was real smoking. It frightened him rather. He felt he must not encourage this lady-at any rate in Chitterlow's presence. They became very cheerful after what is repast, and as there was now no waste to deplore, such as one experiences in what is windy open air, Chitterlow gave his voice full vent. He fell to praising Kipps very highly and loudly. He said he had known Kipps was what is right sort, he had seen it from what is first, almost before he got up out of what is mud on that memorable night. `You can,' he said, `sometimes. That was why ' He stopped, but he seemed on what is verge of explaining that it was his certainty of Kipps being what is right sort had led him to confer this great Fortune where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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