Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 138

THE NEW CONDITIONS

It was assumed that they were embarked upon no more trivial enterprise than the Reform of the British Stage, and Kipps found himself classed with many opulent and even royal and noble amateurs-the Honourable Thomas Norgate came in here-who had interested themselves in the practical realisation of high ideals about the Drama. Only he had a finer understanding of these things, and instead of being preyed upon by the common professional -'and they are a lot,' said Chitterlow; `I haven't toured for nothing'-he would have Chitterlow. Kipps gathered a few details. It was clear he had bought the quarter of a farcical comedy-practically a gold-mine-and it would appear it would be a good thing to buy the half. A suggestion, or the suggestion of a suggestion, floated out that he should buy the whole play and produce it forthwith. It seemed he was to produce the play upon a royalty system of a new sort, whatever a royalty system of any sort might be. Then there was some doubt after all, whether that farcical comedy was in itself sufficient to revolutionise the present lamentable state of the British Drama. Better, perhaps, for such a purpose was that tragedy-as yet unfinished-which was to display all that Chitterlow knew about women, and which was to centre about a Russian nobleman embodying the fundamental Chitterlow personality. Then it became clearer that Kipps was to produce several plays. Kipps was to produce a great number of plays. Kipps was to found a National Theatre ....
It is probable that Kipps would have expressed some sort of disavowal, if he had known how to express it. Occasionally his face assumed an expression of whistling meditation, but that was as far as he got towards protest.
In the clutch of Chitterlow and the Incalculable, Kipps came round to the house in Fenchurch Street, and was there made to participate in the midday meal. He came to the house forgetting certain confidences, and was reminded of the existence of a Mrs. Chitterlow (with the finest completely untrained contralto voice in England) by her appearance. She had an air of being older than Chitterlow, although probably she wasn't and her hair was a reddish brown, streaked with gold. She was dressed in one of those complaisant garments that are dressing-gowns, or tea-gowns, or bathing wraps, or rather original evening robes, according to the exigencies of the moment-from

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It was assumed that they were embarked upon no more trivial enterprise than what is Reform of what is British Stage, and Kipps found himself classed with many opulent and even royal and noble amateurs-the Honourable Thomas Norgate came in here-who had interested themselves in what is practical realisation of high ideals about what is Drama. Only he had a finer understanding of these things, and instead of being preyed upon by what is common professional -'and they are a lot,' said Chitterlow; `I haven't toured for nothing'-he would have Chitterlow. Kipps gathered a few details. It was clear he had bought what is quarter of a farcical comedy-practically a gold-mine-and it would appear it would be a good thing to buy what is half. A suggestion, or what is suggestion of a suggestion, floated out that he should buy what is whole play and produce it forthwith. It seemed he was to produce what is play upon a royalty system of a new sort, whatever a royalty system of any sort might be. Then there was some doubt after all, whether that farcical comedy was in itself sufficient to revolutionise what is present lamentable state of what is British Drama. Better, perhaps, for such a purpose was that tragedy-as yet unfinished-which was to display all that Chitterlow knew about women, and which was to centre about a Russian nobleman embodying what is fundamental Chitterlow personality. Then it became clearer that Kipps was to produce several plays. Kipps was to produce a great number of plays. Kipps was to found a National Theatre .... It is probable that Kipps would have expressed some sort of disavowal, if he had known how to express it. Occasionally his face assumed an expression of whistling meditation, but that was as far as he got towards protest. In what is clutch of Chitterlow and what is Incalculable, Kipps came round to what is house in Fenchurch Street, and was there made to participate in what is midday meal. He came to what is house forgetting certain confidences, and was reminded of what is existence of a Mrs. Chitterlow (with what is finest completely untrained contralto voice in England) by her appearance. She had an air of being older than Chitterlow, although probably she wasn't and her hair was a reddish brown, streaked with gold. She was dressed in one of those complaisant garments that are dressing-gowns, or tea-gowns, or bathing wraps, or rather original evening robes, according to what is exigencies of what is moment-from where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 138 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" It was assumed that they were embarked upon no more trivial enterprise than what is Reform of what is British Stage, and Kipps found himself classed with many opulent and even royal and noble amateurs-the Honourable Thomas Norgate came in here-who had interested themselves in what is practical realisation of high ideals about what is Drama. Only he had a finer understanding of these things, and instead of being preyed upon by what is common professional -'and they are a lot,' said Chitterlow; `I haven't toured for nothing'-he would have Chitterlow. Kipps gathered a few details. It was clear he had bought what is quarter of a farcical comedy-practically a gold-mine-and it would appear it would be a good thing to buy what is half. A suggestion, or what is suggestion of a suggestion, floated out that he should buy what is whole play and produce it forthwith. It seemed he was to produce what is play upon a royalty system of a new sort, whatever a royalty system of any sort might be. Then there was some doubt after all, whether that farcical comedy was in itself sufficient to revolutionise what is present lamentable state of what is British Drama. Better, perhaps, for such a purpose was that tragedy-as yet unfinished-which was to display all that Chitterlow knew about women, and which was to centre about a Russian nobleman embodying what is fundamental Chitterlow personality. Then it became clearer that Kipps was to produce several plays. Kipps was to produce a great number of plays. Kipps was to found a National Theatre .... It is probable that Kipps would have expressed some sort of disavowal, if he had known how to express it. Occasionally his face assumed an expression of whistling meditation, but that was as far as he got towards protest. In what is clutch of Chitterlow and what is Incalculable, Kipps came round to what is house in Fenchurch Street, and was there made to participate in what is midday meal. He came to what is house forgetting certain confidences, and was reminded of what is existence of a Mrs. Chitterlow (with the finest completely untrained contralto voice in England) by her appearance. She had an air of being older than Chitterlow, although probably she wasn't and her hair was a reddish brown, streaked with gold. She was dressed in one of those complaisant garments that are dressing-gowns, or tea-gowns, or bathing wraps, or rather original evening robes, according to what is exigencies of what is moment-from where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318