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Page 137

THE NEW CONDITIONS

He hesitated for a moment before doing so, leaning doubtfully, as it were, towards a bell.
When the housemaid appeared, he was standing on the hearthrug with his legs wide apart, with the bearing of a desperate fellow. And after they had both had whiskies, `You know a decent whisky,' Chitterlow remarked, and took another, `just to drink.' Kipps produced cigarettes, and the conversation flowed again.
Chitterlow paced the room. He was, he explained, taking a day off; that was why he had come round to see Kipps. Whenever he thought of any extensive change in a play he was writing, he always took a day off. In the end it saved time to do so. It prevented his starting rashly upon work that might have to be re-written. There was no good in doing work when you might have to do it over again -none whatever.
Presently they were descending the steps by the parade en route for the Warren, with Chitterlow doing the talking and going with a dancing drop from step to step....
They had a great walk, not a long one, but a great one. They went up by the Sanatorium, and over the East Cliff and into that queer little wilderness of slippery and tumbling clay and rock under the chalk cliffs-a wilderness of thorn and bramble, wild rose and wayfaring tree, that adds so greatly to Folkestone's charm. They traversed its intricacies, and clambered up to the crest of the cliffs at last by a precipitous path that Chitterlow endowed in some mysterious way with suggestions of Alpine adventure. Every now and then he would glance aside at sea and cliffs with a fresh boyishness of imagination that brought back New Romney and the stranded wrecks to Kipps' memory; but mostly he talked of his great obsession, of plays and playwriting and that empty absurdity that is so serious to its kind, his Art. That was a thing that needed a monstrous lot of explaining. Along they went, sometimes abreast, sometimes in single file, up the little paths and down the little paths, and in among the bushes and out along the edge above the beach; and Kipps went along trying ever and again to get an insignificant word in edgeways, and the gestures of Chitterlow flew wide and far, and his great voice rose and fell, and he said this and he said that, and he biffed and banged into the circumambient Inane.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He hesitated for a moment before doing so, leaning doubtfully, as it were, towards a bell. When what is housemaid appeared, he was standing on what is hearthrug with his legs wide apart, with what is bearing of a desperate fellow. And after they had both had whiskies, `You know a decent whisky,' Chitterlow remarked, and took another, `just to drink.' Kipps produced cigarettes, and what is conversation flowed again. Chitterlow paced what is room. He was, he explained, taking a day off; that was why he had come round to see Kipps. Whenever he thought of any extensive change in a play he was writing, he always took a day off. In what is end it saved time to do so. It prevented his starting rashly upon work that might have to be re-written. There was no good in doing work when you might have to do it over again -none whatever. Presently they were descending what is steps by what is parade en route for what is Warren, with Chitterlow doing what is talking and going with a dancing drop from step to step.... They had a great walk, not a long one, but a great one. They went up by what is Sanatorium, and over what is East Cliff and into that queer little wilderness of slippery and tumbling clay and rock under what is chalk cliffs-a wilderness of thorn and bramble, wild rose and wayfaring tree, that adds so greatly to Folkestone's charm. They traversed its intricacies, and clambered up to what is crest of what is cliffs at last by a precipitous path that Chitterlow endowed in some mysterious way with suggestions of Alpine adventure. Every now and then he would glance aside at sea and cliffs with a fresh boyishness of imagination that brought back New Romney and what is stranded wrecks to Kipps' memory; but mostly he talked of his great obsession, of plays and playwriting and that empty absurdity that is so serious to its kind, his Art. That was a thing that needed a monstrous lot of explaining. Along they went, sometimes abreast, sometimes in single file, up what is little paths and down what is little paths, and in among what is bushes and out along what is edge above what is beach; and Kipps went along trying ever and again to get an insignificant word in edgeways, and what is gestures of Chitterlow flew wide and far, and his great voice rose and fell, and he said this and he said that, and he biffed and banged into what is circumambient Inane. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 137 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" He hesitated for a moment before doing so, leaning doubtfully, as it were, towards a bell. When what is housemaid appeared, he was standing on what is hearthrug with his legs wide apart, with what is bearing of a desperate fellow. And after they had both had whiskies, `You know a decent whisky,' Chitterlow remarked, and took another, `just to drink.' Kipps produced cigarettes, and what is conversation flowed again. Chitterlow paced what is room. He was, he explained, taking a day off; that was why he had come round to see Kipps. Whenever he thought of any extensive change in a play he was writing, he always took a day off. In what is end it saved time to do so. It prevented his starting rashly upon work that might have to be re-written. There was no good in doing work when you might have to do it over again -none whatever. Presently they were descending what is steps by what is parade en route for what is Warren, with Chitterlow doing what is talking and going with a dancing drop from step to step.... They had a great walk, not a long one, but a great one. They went up by what is Sanatorium, and over what is East Cliff and into that queer little wilderness of slippery and tumbling clay and rock under what is chalk cliffs-a wilderness of thorn and bramble, wild rose and wayfaring tree, that adds so greatly to Folkestone's charm. They traversed its intricacies, and clambered up to what is crest of the cliffs at last by a precipitous path that Chitterlow endowed in some mysterious way with suggestions of Alpine adventure. Every now and then he would glance aside at sea and cliffs with a fresh boyishness of imagination that brought back New Romney and the stranded wrecks to Kipps' memory; but mostly he talked of his great obsession, of plays and playwriting and that empty absurdity that is so serious to its kind, his Art. That was a thing that needed a monstrous lot of explaining. Along they went, sometimes abreast, sometimes in single file, up what is little paths and down what is little paths, and in among what is bushes and out along what is edge above the beach; and Kipps went along trying ever and again to get an insignificant word in edgeways, and what is gestures of Chitterlow flew wide and far, and his great voice rose and fell, and he said this and he said that, and he biffed and banged into what is circumambient Inane. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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