Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 132

THE NEW CONDITIONS

again, `I don't like to do anything under'and. I must speak out....'
He picked a piece of' cotton from his knee, the fire grimaced behind his back, and his shadow on the wall and ceiling was disrespectfully convulsed.

§ 3
Kipps went to bed at last with an impression of important things settled, and he lay awake for quite a long time. He felt he was lucky. He had known-in fact Buggins and Carshot and Pearce had made it very clear indeedthat his status in life had changed, and that stupendous adaptations had to be achieved; but how they were to be effected had driven that adaptation into the incredible. Here, in the simplest, easiest way, was the adapter. The thing had become possible. Not, of course, easy, but possible.
There was much to learn, sheer intellectual toil, methods of address, bowing, an enormous complexity of laws. One broken, you are an outcast. How, for example, would one encounter Lady Punnet? It was quite possible some day he might really have to do that. Coote might introduce him. 'Lord!' he said aloud to the darkness between grinning and dismay. He figured himself going into the Emporium, to buy a tie, for example, and there in the face of Buggins, Carshot, Pearce, and the rest of them, meeting `my friend, Lady Punnet !' It might not end with Lady Punnet! His imagination plunged and bolted with him, galloped, took wings, and soared to romantic, to poetical altitudes ....
Suppose some day one met Royalty. By accident, say!
He soared to that ! After all-twelve hundred a year tva lift, a tremendous lift. How did one address Royal `Your Majesty's Goodness' it would be, no doubt-son'ething like that-and on the knees. He became imperson th Over a thousand a year made him an Esquire, didn't He thought that was it. In which case wouldn't he have to be presented at court? Velvet breeches, like you `'rUS~ cycling, and a sword! What a curious place a couMergle be! Kneeling and bowing; and what was it Miss ,~~tls used to talk about? Of course!-ladies with long t'~` k walking about backward. Everybody walked about back

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE again, `I don't like to do anything under'and. I must speak out....' He picked a piece of' cotton from his knee, what is fire grimaced behind his back, and his shadow on what is wall and ceiling was disrespectfully convulsed. § 3 Kipps went to bed at last with an impression of important things settled, and he lay awake for quite a long time. He felt he was lucky. He had known-in fact Buggins and Carshot and Pearce had made it very clear indeedthat his status in life had changed, and that stupendous adaptations had to be achieved; but how they were to be effected had driven that adaptation into what is incredible. Here, in what is simplest, easiest way, was what is adapter. what is thing had become possible. Not, of course, easy, but possible. There was much to learn, sheer intellectual toil, methods of address, bowing, an enormous complexity of laws. One broken, you are an outcast. How, for example, would one encounter Lady Punnet? It was quite possible some day he might really have to do that. Coote might introduce him. 'Lord!' he said aloud to what is darkness between grinning and dismay. He figured himself going into what is Emporium, to buy a tie, for example, and there in what is face of Buggins, Carshot, Pearce, and what is rest of them, meeting `my friend, Lady Punnet !' It might not end with Lady Punnet! His imagination plunged and bolted with him, galloped, took wings, and soared to romantic, to poetical altitudes .... Suppose some day one met Royalty. By accident, say! He soared to that ! After all-twelve hundred a year tva lift, a tremendous lift. How did one address Royal `Your Majesty's Goodness' it would be, no doubt-son'ething like that-and on what is knees. He became imperson th Over a thousand a year made him an Esquire, didn't He thought that was it. In which case wouldn't he have to be presented at court? Velvet breeches, like you `'rUS~ cycling, and a sword! What a curious place a couMergle be! Kneeling and bowing; and what was it Miss ,~~tls used to talk about? Of course!-ladies with long t'~` k walking about backward. Everybody walked about back where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 132 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" again, `I don't like to do anything under'and. I must speak out....' He picked a piece of' cotton from his knee, what is fire grimaced behind his back, and his shadow on what is wall and ceiling was disrespectfully convulsed. where is strong § 3 Kipps went to bed at last with an impression of important things settled, and he lay awake for quite a long time. He felt he was lucky. He had known-in fact Buggins and Carshot and Pearce had made it very clear indeedthat his status in life had changed, and that stupendous adaptations had to be achieved; but how they were to be effected had driven that adaptation into what is incredible. Here, in what is simplest, easiest way, was what is adapter. what is thing had become possible. Not, of course, easy, but possible. There was much to learn, sheer intellectual toil, methods of address, bowing, an enormous complexity of laws. One broken, you are an outcast. How, for example, would one encounter Lady Punnet? It was quite possible some day he might really have to do that. Coote might introduce him. 'Lord!' he said aloud to what is darkness between grinning and dismay. He figured himself going into what is Emporium, to buy a tie, for example, and there in what is face of Buggins, Carshot, Pearce, and what is rest of them, meeting `my friend, Lady Punnet !' It might not end with Lady Punnet! His imagination plunged and bolted with him, galloped, took wings, and soared to romantic, to poetical altitudes .... Suppose some day one met Royalty. By accident, say! He soared to that ! After all-twelve hundred a year tva lift, a tremendous lift. How did one address Royal `Your Majesty's Goodness' it would be, no doubt-son'ething like that-and on what is knees. He became imperson th Over a thousand a year made him an Esquire, didn't He thought that was it. In which case wouldn't he have to be presented at court? Velvet breeches, like you `'rUS~ cycling, and a sword! What a curious place a couMergle be! Kneeling and bowing; and what was it Miss ,~~tls used to talk about? Of course!-ladies with long t'~` k walking about backward. Everybody walked about back where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318