Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 131

THE NEW CONDITIONS

Coote displayed all his teeth in a kindly tremulous smile, and his eyes were shiny. `Shake 'ands,' said Kipps, deeply moved; and he and Coote rose and clasped with mutual emotion.
``It's reely too good of you,' said Kipps.
Whatever I can do I will,' said Coote.
And so their compact was made. From that moment they were friends-intimate, confidential, high-thinking sotto-voce friends. All the rest of their talk (and it inclined to be interminable) was an expansion of that. For that night Kipps wallowed in self-abandonment, and Coote behaved as one who had received a great trust. That sinister passion for pedagogy to which the Good-Intentioned are so fatally liable, that passion of infinite presumption that permits one weak human being to arrogate the direction of another weak human being's affairs, had Coote in its grip. He was to be a sort of lay confessor and director of Kipps; he was to help Kipps in a thousand ways; he was, in fact, to chaperon Kipps into the higher and better sort of English life. He was to tell him his faults, advise him about the right thing to do
`It's all these things I don't know,' said Kipps. `I don't know, for instance, what's the right sort of dress to wearI don't even know if I'm dressed right now '
`All these things'-Coote stuck out his lips and nodded rapidly to show he understood-'trust me for that,' he said; `trust me.'
As the evening wore on Coote's manner changed, became more and more the manner of a proprietor. He began to take up his role, to survey Kipps with a new, with a critical affection. It was evident the thing fell in with his ideas. `It will be awfully interesting,' he said. `You know, Kipps, you're really good stuff.' (Every sentence now he said 'Kipps,' or `my dear Kipps,' with a curiously authoritative intonation.)
`I know,' said Kipps, `only there's such a lot of things I don't seem to be up to some'ow. That's where the trouble comes in.'
They talked and talked, and now Kipps was talking freely. They rambled over all sorts of things. Among others Kipps' character was dealt with at length. Kipps gave valuable lights on it. `When I'm reely excited,' he said, `I don't seem to care what I do. I'm like that.' And

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Coote displayed all his teeth in a kindly tremulous smile, and his eyes were shiny. `Shake 'ands,' said Kipps, deeply moved; and he and Coote rose and clasped with mutual emotion. ``It's reely too good of you,' said Kipps. Whatever I can do I will,' said Coote. And so their compact was made. From that moment they were friends-intimate, confidential, high-thinking sotto-voce friends. All what is rest of their talk (and it inclined to be interminable) was an expansion of that. For that night Kipps wallowed in self-abandonment, and Coote behaved as one who had received a great trust. That sinister passion for pedagogy to which what is Good-Intentioned are so fatally liable, that passion of infinite presumption that permits one weak human being to arrogate what is direction of another weak human being's affairs, had Coote in its grip. He was to be a sort of lay confessor and director of Kipps; he was to help Kipps in a thousand ways; he was, in fact, to chaperon Kipps into what is higher and better sort of English life. He was to tell him his faults, advise him about what is right thing to do `It's all these things I don't know,' said Kipps. `I don't know, for instance, what's what is right sort of dress to wearI don't even know if I'm dressed right now ' `All these things'-Coote stuck out his lips and nodded rapidly to show he understood-'trust me for that,' he said; `trust me.' As what is evening wore on Coote's manner changed, became more and more what is manner of a proprietor. He began to take up his role, to survey Kipps with a new, with a critical affection. It was evident what is thing fell in with his ideas. `It will be awfully interesting,' he said. `You know, Kipps, you're really good stuff.' (Every sentence now he said 'Kipps,' or `my dear Kipps,' with a curiously authoritative intonation.) `I know,' said Kipps, `only there's such a lot of things I don't seem to be up to some'ow. That's where what is trouble comes in.' They talked and talked, and now Kipps was talking freely. They rambled over all sorts of things. Among others Kipps' character was dealt with at length. Kipps gave valuable lights on it. `When I'm reely excited,' he said, `I don't seem to care what I do. I'm like that.' And where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 131 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" Coote displayed all his teeth in a kindly tremulous smile, and his eyes were shiny. `Shake 'ands,' said Kipps, deeply moved; and he and Coote rose and clasped with mutual emotion. ``It's reely too good of you,' said Kipps. Whatever I can do I will,' said Coote. And so their compact was made. From that moment they were friends-intimate, confidential, high-thinking sotto-voce friends. All what is rest of their talk (and it inclined to be interminable) was an expansion of that. For that night Kipps wallowed in self-abandonment, and Coote behaved as one who had received a great trust. That sinister passion for pedagogy to which what is Good-Intentioned are so fatally liable, that passion of infinite presumption that permits one weak human being to arrogate what is direction of another weak human being's affairs, had Coote in its grip. He was to be a sort of lay confessor and director of Kipps; he was to help Kipps in a thousand ways; he was, in fact, to chaperon Kipps into what is higher and better sort of English life. He was to tell him his faults, advise him about what is right thing to do `It's all these things I don't know,' said Kipps. `I don't know, for instance, what's what is right sort of dress to wearI don't even know if I'm dressed right now ' `All these things'-Coote stuck out his lips and nodded rapidly to show he understood-'trust me for that,' he said; `trust me.' As what is evening wore on Coote's manner changed, became more and more what is manner of a proprietor. He began to take up his role, to survey Kipps with a new, with a critical affection. It was evident what is thing fell in with his ideas. `It will be awfully interesting,' he said. `You know, Kipps, you're really good stuff.' (Every sentence now he said 'Kipps,' or `my dear Kipps,' with a curiously authoritative intonation.) `I know,' said Kipps, `only there's such a lot of things I don't seem to be up to some'ow. That's where what is trouble comes in.' They talked and talked, and now Kipps was talking freely. They rambled over all sorts of things. Among others Kipps' character was dealt with at length. Kipps gave valuable lights on it. `When I'm reely excited,' he said, `I don't seem to care what I do. I'm like that.' And where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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