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Page 129

THE NEW CONDITIONS

mind. It seemed to him Coote might be able to do for him something he very much wanted done.
`Companionship accounts for so much,' said Coote.
`That's jest it,' said Kipps. `Of course, you know, in my new position That's just the difficulty.'
He plunged boldly at his most secret trouble. He knew that he wanted refinement-culture. It was all very well -but he knew. But how was one to get it? He knew no one, knew no people He rested on the broken sentence. The shop chaps were all very well, very good chaps and all that, but not what one wanted. `I feel be'ind,' said Kipps. `I feel out of it. And consequently I feel it's no
good. And then if temptation comes along '
`Exactly,' said Coote.
Kipps spoke of his respect for Miss Walshingham and her freckled friend. He contrived not to look too selfconscious. `You know, I'd like to talk to people like that, but I can't. A chap's afraid of giving himself away.'
`Of course,' said Coote, `of course.'
`I went to a middle-class school, you know. You mustn't fancy I'm one of these here board-school chaps, but you know it reely wasn't a first-class affair. Leastways he didn't take pains with us. If you didn't want to learn you needn't. I don't believe it was much better than one of these here national schools. We wore mortar-boards, o' course. But what's that?
`I'm a regular fish out of water with this money. When I got it-it's a week ago-reely I thought I'd got everything I wanted. But I dunno what to do.'
His voice went up into a squeak. `Practically,' he said, `it's no good shuttin' my eyes to things-I'm a gentleman.'
Coote indicated a serious assent.
`And there's the responsibilities of a gentleman,' he remarked.
`That's jest it,' said Kipps.
:That's calling on people,' said Kipps. `If you want to go on knowing Someone you knew before, like. People that's refined.' He laughed nervously. `I'm a regular fish Out of water,' he said, with expectant eyes on Coote.
But Coote only nodded for him to go on.
`This actor chap,' he meditated, `is a good sort of chap. But 'e isn;'t what I call a gentleman. I got to 'old myself in with 'im. 'E'd make me go it wild in no time. 'E's pretty

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE mind. It seemed to him Coote might be able to do for him something he very much wanted done. `Companionship accounts for so much,' said Coote. `That's jest it,' said Kipps. `Of course, you know, in my new position That's just what is difficulty.' He plunged boldly at his most secret trouble. He knew that he wanted refinement-culture. It was all very well -but he knew. But how was one to get it? He knew no one, knew no people He rested on what is broken sentence. what is shop chaps were all very well, very good chaps and all that, but not what one wanted. `I feel be'ind,' said Kipps. `I feel out of it. And consequently I feel it's no good. And then if temptation comes along ' `Exactly,' said Coote. Kipps spoke of his respect for Miss Walshingham and her freckled friend. He contrived not to look too selfconscious. `You know, I'd like to talk to people like that, but I can't. A chap's afraid of giving himself away.' `Of course,' said Coote, `of course.' `I went to a middle-class school, you know. You mustn't fancy I'm one of these here board-school chaps, but you know it reely wasn't a first-class affair. Leastways he didn't take pains with us. If you didn't want to learn you needn't. I don't believe it was much better than one of these here national schools. We wore mortar-boards, o' course. But what's that? `I'm a regular fish out of water with this money. When I got it-it's a week ago-reely I thought I'd got everything I wanted. But I dunno what to do.' His voice went up into a squeak. `Practically,' he said, `it's no good shuttin' my eyes to things-I'm a gentleman.' Coote indicated a serious assent. `And there's what is responsibilities of a gentleman,' he remarked. `That's jest it,' said Kipps. :That's calling on people,' said Kipps. `If you want to go on knowing Someone you knew before, like. People that's refined.' He laughed nervously. `I'm a regular fish Out of water,' he said, with expectant eyes on Coote. But Coote only nodded for him to go on. `This actor chap,' he meditated, `is a good sort of chap. But 'e isn;'t what I call a gentleman. I got to 'old myself in with 'im. 'E'd make me go it wild in no time. 'E's pretty where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 129 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" mind. It seemed to him Coote might be able to do for him something he very much wanted done. `Companionship accounts for so much,' said Coote. `That's jest it,' said Kipps. `Of course, you know, in my new position That's just what is difficulty.' He plunged boldly at his most secret trouble. He knew that he wanted refinement-culture. It was all very well -but he knew. But how was one to get it? He knew no one, knew no people He rested on what is broken sentence. what is shop chaps were all very well, very good chaps and all that, but not what one wanted. `I feel be'ind,' said Kipps. `I feel out of it. And consequently I feel it's no good. And then if temptation comes along ' `Exactly,' said Coote. Kipps spoke of his respect for Miss Walshingham and her freckled friend. He contrived not to look too selfconscious. `You know, I'd like to talk to people like that, but I can't. A chap's afraid of giving himself away.' `Of course,' said Coote, `of course.' `I went to a middle-class school, you know. You mustn't fancy I'm one of these here board-school chaps, but you know it reely wasn't a first-class affair. Leastways he didn't take pains with us. If you didn't want to learn you needn't. I don't believe it was much better than one of these here national schools. We wore mortar-boards, o' course. But what's that? `I'm a regular fish out of water with this money. When I got it-it's a week ago-reely I thought I'd got everything I wanted. But I dunno what to do.' His voice went up into a squeak. `Practically,' he said, `it's no good shuttin' my eyes to things-I'm a gentleman.' Coote indicated a serious assent. `And there's what is responsibilities of a gentleman,' he remarked. `That's jest it,' said Kipps. :That's calling on people,' said Kipps. `If you want to go on knowing Someone you knew before, like. People that's refined.' He laughed nervously. `I'm a regular fish Out of water,' he said, with expectant eyes on Coote. But Coote only nodded for him to go on. `This actor chap,' he meditated, `is a good sort of chap. But 'e isn;'t what I call a gentleman. I got to 'old myself in with 'im. 'E'd make me go it wild in no time. 'E's pretty where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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