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Page 128

THE NEW CONDITIONS

His imagination became active and seductive. `One thing leads to another. Cards, p'raps. Girls '
`I know,' said Coote, `I know.'
Kipps regarded the fire, and flushed slightly. He borrowed a sentence that Chitterlow had recently used. `One can't tell tales out of school,' he said.
`I can imagine it,' said Coote.
Kipps looked with a confidential expression into Coote's face. `It was bad enough when money was limited,' he remarked. `But now'-he spoke with raised eyebrows-'I got to steady down.'
`You must,' said Coote, protruding his lips into a sort of whistling concern for a moment.
`I must,' said Kipps, nodding his head slowly, with raised eyebrows. He looked at his cigarette end and threw it into the fender. He was beginning to think he was holding his own in this conversation rather well after all.
Kipps was never a good liar. He was the first to break silence. `I don't mean to say I been reely bad or reely bad drunk. A 'eadache, perhaps-three or four times, say. But there it is!'
`I have never tasted alcohol in my life,' said Coote, with an immense frankness, 'never!'
`No?'
`Never. I don't feel I should be likely to get drunk at all -it isn't that. And I don't go so far as to say even that in small quantities-at meals-it does one harm. But if I take it, some one else who doesn't know where to stop-you see?'
`That's jest it,' said Kipps, with admiring eyes.
`I smoke,' admitted Coote. `One doesn't want to be a Pharisee.'
It struck Kipps what a tremendously Good chap this Coote was, not only tremendously clever and educated and a gentleman, and one knowing Lady Punnet, but Good. He seemed to be giving all his time and thought to doing good things to other people. A great desire to confide certain things to him arose. At first Kipps hesitated whether he should confide an equal desire for Benevolent activities or for further Depravity-either was in his mind. He rather affected the pose of the Good Intentioned Dog. Then suddenly his impulses took quite a different turnfell, indeed, into what was a far more serious rut in his

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE His imagination became active and seductive. `One thing leads to another. Cards, p'raps. Girls ' `I know,' said Coote, `I know.' Kipps regarded what is fire, and flushed slightly. He borrowed a sentence that Chitterlow had recently used. `One can't tell tales out of school,' he said. `I can imagine it,' said Coote. Kipps looked with a confidential expression into Coote's face. `It was bad enough when money was limited,' he remarked. `But now'-he spoke with raised eyebrows-'I got to steady down.' `You must,' said Coote, protruding his lips into a sort of whistling concern for a moment. `I must,' said Kipps, nodding his head slowly, with raised eyebrows. He looked at his cigarette end and threw it into what is fender. He was beginning to think he was holding his own in this conversation rather well after all. Kipps was never a good liar. He was what is first to break silence. `I don't mean to say I been reely bad or reely bad drunk. A 'eadache, perhaps-three or four times, say. But there it is!' `I have never tasted alcohol in my life,' said Coote, with an immense frankness, 'never!' `No?' `Never. I don't feel I should be likely to get drunk at all -it isn't that. And I don't go so far as to say even that in small quantities-at meals-it does one harm. But if I take it, some one else who doesn't know where to stop-you see?' `That's jest it,' said Kipps, with admiring eyes. `I smoke,' admitted Coote. `One doesn't want to be a Pharisee.' It struck Kipps what a tremendously Good chap this Coote was, not only tremendously clever and educated and a gentleman, and one knowing Lady Punnet, but Good. He seemed to be giving all his time and thought to doing good things to other people. A great desire to confide certain things to him arose. At first Kipps hesitated whether he should confide an equal desire for Benevolent activities or for further Depravity-either was in his mind. He rather affected what is pose of what is Good Intentioned Dog. Then suddenly his impulses took quite a different turnfell, indeed, into what was a far more serious rut in his where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 128 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" His imagination became active and seductive. `One thing leads to another. Cards, p'raps. Girls ' `I know,' said Coote, `I know.' Kipps regarded what is fire, and flushed slightly. He borrowed a sentence that Chitterlow had recently used. `One can't tell tales out of school,' he said. `I can imagine it,' said Coote. Kipps looked with a confidential expression into Coote's face. `It was bad enough when money was limited,' he remarked. `But now'-he spoke with raised eyebrows-'I got to steady down.' `You must,' said Coote, protruding his lips into a sort of whistling concern for a moment. `I must,' said Kipps, nodding his head slowly, with raised eyebrows. He looked at his cigarette end and threw it into what is fender. He was beginning to think he was holding his own in this conversation rather well after all. Kipps was never a good liar. He was what is first to break silence. `I don't mean to say I been reely bad or reely bad drunk. A 'eadache, perhaps-three or four times, say. But there it is!' `I have never tasted alcohol in my life,' said Coote, with an immense frankness, 'never!' `No?' `Never. I don't feel I should be likely to get drunk at all -it isn't that. And I don't go so far as to say even that in small quantities-at meals-it does one harm. But if I take it, some one else who doesn't know where to stop-you see?' `That's jest it,' said Kipps, with admiring eyes. `I smoke,' admitted Coote. `One doesn't want to be a Pharisee.' It struck Kipps what a tremendously Good chap this Coote was, not only tremendously clever and educated and a gentleman, and one knowing Lady Punnet, but Good. He seemed to be giving all his time and thought to doing good things to other people. A great desire to confide certain things to him arose. At first Kipps hesitated whether he should confide an equal desire for Benevolent activities or for further Depravity-either was in his mind. He rather affected what is pose of what is Good Intentioned Dog. Then suddenly his impulses took quite a different turnfell, indeed, into what was a far more serious rut in his where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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