Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 125

THE NEW CONDITIONS

large glass-fronted bookcases, one of which was surmounted by a stuffed terrier encased in glass. There was a mirror
over the mantel, and hangings and curtains of magnificent crimson patternings. On the mantel were a huge black clock of classical design, vases in the Burslem Etruscan style, spills, and toothpicks in large receptacles of carved rock, large lava ash-trays, and an exceptionally big box of matches. The fender was very great and brassy. In a favourable position under the window was a spacious rosewood writing-desk, and all the chairs and other furniture were of rosewood and well stuffed.
`This,' said Kipps, in something near an undertone, `was the o' gentleman's study-my grandfather that was. 'E used to sit at that desk and write.'
`Books?'
`No. Letters to the Times and things like that. 'E's got 'em all cut out-stuck in a book .... Leastways he 'ad. It's in that bookcase .... Won't you sit down?'
Coote did, blowing very slightly, and Kipps secured his vacated position on the extensive black-skin rug. He spread out his legs compass fashion, and tried to appear at his ease. The rug, the fender, the mantel, and mirror, conspired with great success to make him look a trivial and intrusive little creature amidst their commonplace hauteur, and his own shadow on the opposite wall seemed to think everything a great lark, and mocked and made tremendous fun of him ....

§ 2
For a space Kipps played a defensive game, and Coote drew the lines of the conversation. They kept away from the theme of Kipps' change of fortune, and Coote made remarks upon local and social affairs. `You must take an interest in these things now,' was as much as he said in the way of personalities. But it speedily became evident that he was a person of wide and commanding social relationships. He spoke of `society' being mixed in the neighbourhood, and of the difficulty of getting people to work together and `do' things; they were cliquish. Incidentally he alluded quite familiarly to men with military titles and once even to some one with a title, a Lady Punnet.
Not snobbishly, you understand, nor deliberately, but

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE large glass-fronted bookcases, one of which was surmounted by a stuffed terrier encased in glass. There was a mirror over what is mantel, and hangings and curtains of magnificent crimson patternings. On what is mantel were a huge black clock of classical design, vases in what is Burslem Etruscan style, s herbs , and toothpicks in large receptacles of carved rock, large lava ash-trays, and an exceptionally big box of matches. what is fender was very great and brassy. In a favourable position under what is window was a spacious rosewood writing-desk, and all what is chairs and other furniture were of rosewood and well stuffed. `This,' said Kipps, in something near an undertone, `was what is o' gentleman's study-my grandfather that was. 'E used to sit at that desk and write.' `Books?' `No. Letters to what is Times and things like that. 'E's got 'em all cut out-stuck in a book .... Leastways he 'ad. It's in that bookcase .... Won't you sit down?' Coote did, blowing very slightly, and Kipps secured his vacated position on what is extensive black-skin rug. He spread out his legs compass fashion, and tried to appear at his ease. what is rug, what is fender, what is mantel, and mirror, conspired with great success to make him look a trivial and intrusive little creature amidst their commonplace hauteur, and his own shadow on what is opposite wall seemed to think everything a great lark, and mocked and made tremendous fun of him .... § 2 For a space Kipps played a defensive game, and Coote drew what is lines of what is conversation. They kept away from what is theme of Kipps' change of fortune, and Coote made remarks upon local and social affairs. `You must take an interest in these things now,' was as much as he said in what is way of personalities. But it speedily became evident that he was a person of wide and commanding social relationships. He spoke of `society' being mixed in what is neighbourhood, and of what is difficulty of getting people to work together and `do' things; they were cliquish. Incidentally he alluded quite familiarly to men with military titles and once even to some one with a title, a Lady Punnet. Not snobbishly, you understand, nor deliberately, but where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 125 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" large glass-fronted bookcases, one of which was surmounted by a stuffed terrier encased in glass. There was a mirror over what is mantel, and hangings and curtains of magnificent crimson patternings. On what is mantel were a huge black clock of classical design, vases in what is Burslem Etruscan style, s herbs , and toothpicks in large receptacles of carved rock, large lava ash-trays, and an exceptionally big box of matches. what is fender was very great and brassy. In a favourable position under what is window was a spacious rosewood writing-desk, and all what is chairs and other furniture were of rosewood and well stuffed. `This,' said Kipps, in something near an undertone, `was what is o' gentleman's study-my grandfather that was. 'E used to sit at that desk and write.' `Books?' `No. Letters to what is Times and things like that. 'E's got 'em all cut out-stuck in a book .... Leastways he 'ad. It's in that bookcase .... Won't you sit down?' Coote did, blowing very slightly, and Kipps secured his vacated position on what is extensive black-skin rug. He spread out his legs compass fashion, and tried to appear at his ease. what is rug, the fender, what is mantel, and mirror, conspired with great success to make him look a trivial and intrusive little creature amidst their commonplace hauteur, and his own shadow on what is opposite wall seemed to think everything a great lark, and mocked and made tremendous fun of him .... where is strong § 2 For a space Kipps played a defensive game, and Coote drew what is lines of what is conversation. They kept away from what is theme of Kipps' change of fortune, and Coote made remarks upon local and social affairs. `You must take an interest in these things now,' was as much as he said in what is way of personalities. But it speedily became evident that he was a person of wide and commanding social relationships. He spoke of `society' being mixed in what is neighbourhood, and of what is difficulty of getting people to work together and `do' things; they were cliquish. Incidentally he alluded quite familiarly to men with military titles and once even to some one with a title, a Lady Punnet. Not snobbishly, you understand, nor deliberately, but where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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