Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 124

THE NEW CONDITIONS

do that,' said Coote; and Kipps was inspired to throw his head back, cock it on one side, regard the harbour with one eye shut, and say that it would take some doing. Then Coote said something about 'Abend,' which Kipps judged to be in a foreign language, and got over by lighting another cigarette from his by no means completed first one. `You're right puff, puff.'
He felt that so far he had held up his end of the conversation in a very creditable manner, but that extreme discretion was advisable.
this.They turned away, and Coote remarked that the sea was good for crossing, and asked Kipps if he had been over the water very much. Kipps said he hadn't been'much,' but he thought very likely he'd have a run over to Boulogne soon; and Coote proceeded to talk of the charms of foreign travel, mentioning quite a number of unheard-of places by name. He had been to them ! Kipps remained on the defensive, but behind his defences his heart sank. It was all very well to pretend, but presently it was bound to come out. He didn't know anything of all ...
So they drew near the house. At his own gate Kipps became extremely nervous. It was a fine impressive door. He knocked neither a single knock nor a double but about one and a half-an apologetic half. They were admitted by an irreproachable housemaid with a steady eye, before which Kipps cringed dreadfully. He hung up his hat and fell about over hall chairs and things. `There's a fire in the study, Mary?' he had the audacity to ask, though evidently he knew, and led the way upstairs panting. He tried to shut the door and discovered the housemaid behind him coming to light his lamp. This enfeebled him further. He said nothing until the door closed behind her. Meanwhile to show his sang-froid, he hummed and flitted towards the window and here and there.
Coote went to the big hearthrug and turned and surveyed his host. His hand went to the back of his head and patted his occiput-a gesture frequent with him.
" Ere we are,' said Kipps, hands in his pockets, and glancing round him.
It was a gaunt, Victorian room, with a heavy, dirty cornice, and the ceiling enriched by the radiant plaster ornament of an obliterated gas chandelier. It held two

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE do that,' said Coote; and Kipps was inspired to throw his head back, cock it on one side, regard what is harbour with one eye shut, and say that it would take some doing. Then Coote said something about 'Abend,' which Kipps judged to be in a foreign language, and got over by lighting another cigarette from his by no means completed first one. `You're right puff, puff.' He felt that so far he had held up his end of what is conversation in a very creditable manner, but that extreme discretion was advisable. this.They turned away, and Coote remarked that what is sea was good for crossing, and asked Kipps if he had been over what is water very much. Kipps said he hadn't been'much,' but he thought very likely he'd have a run over to Boulogne soon; and Coote proceeded to talk of what is charms of foreign travel, mentioning quite a number of unheard-of places by name. He had been to them ! Kipps remained on what is defensive, but behind his defences his heart sank. It was all very well to pretend, but presently it was bound to come out. He didn't know anything of all ... So they drew near what is house. At his own gate Kipps became extremely nervous. It was a fine impressive door. He knocked neither a single knock nor a double but about one and a half-an apologetic half. They were admitted by an irreproachable housemaid with a steady eye, before which Kipps cringed dreadfully. He hung up his hat and fell about over hall chairs and things. `There's a fire in what is study, Mary?' he had what is audacity to ask, though evidently he knew, and led what is way upstairs panting. He tried to shut what is door and discovered what is housemaid behind him coming to light his lamp. This enfeebled him further. He said nothing until what is door closed behind her. Meanwhile to show his sang-froid, he hummed and flitted towards what is window and here and there. Coote went to what is big hearthrug and turned and surveyed his host. His hand went to what is back of his head and patted his occiput-a gesture frequent with him. " Ere we are,' said Kipps, hands in his pockets, and glancing round him. It was a gaunt, Victorian room, with a heavy, dirty cornice, and what is ceiling enriched by what is radiant plaster ornament of an obliterated gas chandelier. It held two where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 124 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" do that,' said Coote; and Kipps was inspired to throw his head back, cock it on one side, regard what is harbour with one eye shut, and say that it would take some doing. Then Coote said something about 'Abend,' which Kipps judged to be in a foreign language, and got over by lighting another cigarette from his by no means completed first one. `You're right puff, puff.' He felt that so far he had held up his end of what is conversation in a very creditable manner, but that extreme discretion was advisable. this.They turned away, and Coote remarked that what is sea was good for crossing, and asked Kipps if he had been over what is water very much. Kipps said he hadn't been'much,' but he thought very likely he'd have a run over to Boulogne soon; and Coote proceeded to talk of what is charms of foreign travel, mentioning quite a number of unheard-of places by name. He had been to them ! Kipps remained on what is defensive, but behind his defences his heart sank. It was all very well to pretend, but presently it was bound to come out. He didn't know anything of all ... So they drew near what is house. At his own gate Kipps became extremely nervous. It was a fine impressive door. He knocked neither a single knock nor a double but about one and a half-an apologetic half. They were admitted by an irreproachable housemaid with a steady eye, before which Kipps cringed dreadfully. He hung up his hat and fell about over hall chairs and things. `There's a fire in what is study, Mary?' he had what is audacity to ask, though evidently he knew, and led what is way upstairs panting. He tried to shut the door and discovered what is housemaid behind him coming to light his lamp. This enfeebled him further. He said nothing until what is door closed behind her. Meanwhile to show his sang-froid, he hummed and flitted towards what is window and here and there. Coote went to what is big hearthrug and turned and surveyed his host. His hand went to what is back of his head and patted his occiput-a gesture frequent with him. " Ere we are,' said Kipps, hands in his pockets, and glancing round him. It was a gaunt, Victorian room, with a heavy, dirty cornice, and what is ceiling enriched by what is radiant plaster ornament of an obliterated gas chandelier. It held two where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318