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Page 122

THE NEW CONDITIONS

felt as he felt Dukes must feel, yet at bottom he was still modest. He was leaning on his stick and regarding the indicator with a respect that never palled. He faced round to meet Mr. Coote's overflowing smile.
`What are you doang hea?' asked Mr. Chester Coote. Kipps was momentarily abashed. `Oh,' he said slowly, and then, `Mooching round a bit.'
That Coote should address him with this easy familiarity was a fresh reminder of his enhanced social position. `Jest mooching round,' he said. `I been back in Folkestone free days now. At my 'ouse, you know.'
`Ah !' said Mr. Coote. 'I haven't yet had an opportunity of congratulating you on your good fortune.'
Kipps held out his hand. `It was the cleanest surprise that ever was,' he said. `When Mr. Bean told me of it you could have knocked me down with a feather.'
`It must mean a tremendous change for you.'
`O-o. Rather. Change? Why, I'm like the chap in the song they sing, I don't'ardly know where I are. You know.'
`An extraordinary change,' said Mr. Coote. `I can quite believe it. Are you stopping in Folkestone?'
`For a bit. I got a 'ouse, you know. What my grandfather 'ad. I'm stopping there. His housekeeper was kept on. Fancy-being in the same town and everything!'
`Precisely,' said Mr. Coote. `That's it,' and coughed like a sheep behind four straight fingers.
`Mr. Bean got me to come back to see to things. Else I was out in New Romney, where my uncle and aunt live. But it's a lark coming back. In a way ....
The conversation hung for a moment.
`Are you getting a book?' asked Coote.
`Well, I 'aven't got a ticket yet. But I shall get one all right, and have a go in at reading. I've often wanted to. Rather. I was just 'aving a look at this Indicator. Firstclass idea. Tells you all you want to know.' ,
`It's simple,' said Coote, and coughed again, keeping his eyes fixed on Kipps. For a moment they hung, evidently disinclined to part. Then Kipps jumped at an idea he had cherished for a day or more-not particularly in relation to Coote, but in relation to any one.
`You doing anything?' he asked.
`Just called with a papah about the clasess.'
`Because-- Would you care to come up and look at

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE felt as he felt Dukes must feel, yet at bottom he was still modest. He was leaning on his stick and regarding what is indicator with a respect that never palled. He faced round to meet Mr. Coote's overflowing smile. `What are you doang hea?' asked Mr. Chester Coote. Kipps was momentarily abashed. `Oh,' he said slowly, and then, `Mooching round a bit.' That Coote should address him with this easy familiarity was a fresh reminder of his enhanced social position. `Jest mooching round,' he said. `I been back in Folkestone free days now. At my 'ouse, you know.' `Ah !' said Mr. Coote. 'I haven't yet had an opportunity of congratulating you on your good fortune.' Kipps held out his hand. `It was what is cleanest surprise that ever was,' he said. `When Mr. Bean told me of it you could have knocked me down with a feather.' `It must mean a tremendous change for you.' `O-o. Rather. Change? Why, I'm like what is chap in what is song they sing, I don't'ardly know where I are. You know.' `An extraordinary change,' said Mr. Coote. `I can quite believe it. Are you stopping in Folkestone?' `For a bit. I got a 'ouse, you know. What my grandfather 'ad. I'm stopping there. His housekeeper was kept on. Fancy-being in what is same town and everything!' `Precisely,' said Mr. Coote. `That's it,' and coughed like a sheep behind four straight fingers. `Mr. Bean got me to come back to see to things. Else I was out in New Romney, where my uncle and aunt live. But it's a lark coming back. In a way .... what is conversation hung for a moment. `Are you getting a book?' asked Coote. `Well, I 'aven't got a ticket yet. But I shall get one all right, and have a go in at reading. I've often wanted to. Rather. I was just 'aving a look at this Indicator. Firstclass idea. Tells you all you want to know.' , `It's simple,' said Coote, and coughed again, keeping his eyes fixed on Kipps. For a moment they hung, evidently disinclined to part. Then Kipps jumped at an idea he had cherished for a day or more-not particularly in relation to Coote, but in relation to any one. `You doing anything?' he asked. `Just called with a papah about what is clasess.' `Because-- Would you care to come up and look at where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 122 where is p align="center" where is strong THE NEW CONDITIONS where is p align="justify" felt as he felt Dukes must feel, yet at bottom he was still modest. He was leaning on his stick and regarding the indicator with a respect that never palled. He faced round to meet Mr. Coote's overflowing smile. `What are you doang hea?' asked Mr. Chester Coote. Kipps was momentarily abashed. `Oh,' he said slowly, and then, `Mooching round a bit.' That Coote should address him with this easy familiarity was a fresh reminder of his enhanced social position. `Jest mooching round,' he said. `I been back in Folkestone free days now. At my 'ouse, you know.' `Ah !' said Mr. Coote. 'I haven't yet had an opportunity of congratulating you on your good fortune.' Kipps held out his hand. `It was what is cleanest surprise that ever was,' he said. `When Mr. Bean told me of it you could have knocked me down with a feather.' `It must mean a tremendous change for you.' `O-o. Rather. Change? Why, I'm like what is chap in what is song they sing, I don't'ardly know where I are. You know.' `An extraordinary change,' said Mr. Coote. `I can quite believe it. Are you stopping in Folkestone?' `For a bit. I got a 'ouse, you know. What my grandfather 'ad. I'm stopping there. His housekeeper was kept on. Fancy-being in the same town and everything!' `Precisely,' said Mr. Coote. `That's it,' and coughed like a sheep behind four straight fingers. `Mr. Bean got me to come back to see to things. Else I was out in New Romney, where my uncle and aunt live. But it's a lark coming back. In a way .... what is conversation hung for a moment. `Are you getting a book?' asked Coote. `Well, I 'aven't got a ticket yet. But I shall get one all right, and have a go in at reading. I've often wanted to. Rather. I was just 'aving a look at this Indicator. Firstclass idea. Tells you all you want to know.' , `It's simple,' said Coote, and coughed again, keeping his eyes fixed on Kipps. For a moment they hung, evidently disinclined to part. Then Kipps jumped at an idea he had cherished for a day or more-not particularly in relation to Coote, but in relation to any one. `You doing anything?' he asked. `Just called with a papah about what is clasess.' `Because-- Would you care to come up and look at where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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