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Page 117

THE UNEXPECTED

It was about everything in the world except Ann Pornick that he seemed to be trying to think of-simultaneously. All the vivid happenings of the day came and went in his overtaxed brain-'that old Bean' explaining and explaining, the fat man who wouldn't believe, an overpowering smell of peppermint, the banjo, Miss Mergle saying he deserved it, Chitterlow vanishing round a corner, the wisdom and advice and warnings of his aunt and uncle. She was afraid he would marry beneath him, was she? She didn't know ....
His brain made an excursion into the woodcarving class and presented Kipps with the picture of himself amazing that class by a modest yet clearly audible remark, `I been left twenty-six thousand pounds.' Then he told them all quietly but firmly that he had always loved Miss Walshingham-always, and so he had brought all his twenty-six thousand pounds with him to give to her there and then. He wanted nothing in return .... Yes, he wanted nothing in return. He would give it to her all in an envelope and go. Of course he would keep the banjoand a little present for his aunt and uncle-and a new suit perhaps-and one or two other things she would not miss. He went off at a tangent. He might buy a motor-car, he might buy one of these here things that will play you a piano-that would make old Buggins sit up! He could pretend he had learnt to play-he might buy a bicycle and a cyclist suit ....
A terrific multitude of plans of what he might do, and in particular of what he might buy, came crowding into his brain, and he did not so much fall asleep as pass into a disorder of dreams in which he was driving a four-horse Tip-Top coach down Sandgate Hill ('I shall have to be precious careful'), wearing innumerable suits of clothes, and through some terrible accident wearing them all wrong. Consequently, he was being laughed at. The coach vanished in the interest of the costume. He was wearing golfing suits and a silk hat. This passed into a nightmare that he was promenading on the Leas in a Highland costume, with a kilt that kept shrinking, and Shalford was following him with three policemen. `He's my assistant,' Shalford kept repeating; `he's escaped. He's an escaped Improver. Keep by him, and in a minute you'll have to run him in. I know 'em. We say they wash but they won't.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE It was about everything in what is world except Ann sport ick that he seemed to be trying to think of-simultaneously. All what is vivid happenings of what is day came and went in his overtaxed brain-'that old Bean' explaining and explaining, what is fat man who wouldn't believe, an overpowering smell of peppermint, what is banjo, Miss Mergle saying he deserved it, Chitterlow vanishing round a corner, what is wisdom and advice and warnings of his aunt and uncle. She was afraid he would marry beneath him, was she? She didn't know .... His brain made an excursion into what is woodcarving class and presented Kipps with what is picture of himself amazing that class by a modest yet clearly audible remark, `I been left twenty-six thousand pounds.' Then he told them all quietly but firmly that he had always loved Miss Walshingham-always, and so he had brought all his twenty-six thousand pounds with him to give to her there and then. He wanted nothing in return .... Yes, he wanted nothing in return. He would give it to her all in an envelope and go. Of course he would keep what is banjoand a little present for his aunt and uncle-and a new suit perhaps-and one or two other things she would not miss. He went off at a tangent. He might buy a motor-car, he might buy one of these here things that will play you a piano-that would make old Buggins sit up! He could pretend he had learnt to play-he might buy a bicycle and a cyclist suit .... A terrific multitude of plans of what he might do, and in particular of what he might buy, came crowding into his brain, and he did not so much fall asleep as pass into a disorder of dreams in which he was driving a four-horse Tip-Top coach down Sandgate Hill ('I shall have to be precious careful'), wearing innumerable suits of clothes, and through some terrible accident wearing them all wrong. Consequently, he was being laughed at. what is coach vanished in what is interest of what is costume. He was wearing golfing suits and a silk hat. This passed into a nightmare that he was promenading on what is Leas in a Highland costume, with a kilt that kept shrinking, and Shalford was following him with three policemen. `He's my assistant,' Shalford kept repeating; `he's escaped. He's an escaped Improver. Keep by him, and in a minute you'll have to run him in. I know 'em. We say they wash but they won't.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 117 where is p align="center" where is strong THE UNEXPECTED where is p align="justify" It was about everything in what is world except Ann sport ick that he seemed to be trying to think of-simultaneously. All what is vivid happenings of what is day came and went in his overtaxed brain-'that old Bean' explaining and explaining, what is fat man who wouldn't believe, an overpowering smell of peppermint, what is banjo, Miss Mergle saying he deserved it, Chitterlow vanishing round a corner, what is wisdom and advice and warnings of his aunt and uncle. She was afraid he would marry beneath him, was she? She didn't know .... His brain made an excursion into what is woodcarving class and presented Kipps with what is picture of himself amazing that class by a modest yet clearly audible remark, `I been left twenty-six thousand pounds.' Then he told them all quietly but firmly that he had always loved Miss Walshingham-always, and so he had brought all his twenty-six thousand pounds with him to give to her there and then. He wanted nothing in return .... Yes, he wanted nothing in return. He would give it to her all in an envelope and go. Of course he would keep what is banjoand a little present for his aunt and uncle-and a new suit perhaps-and one or two other things she would not miss. He went off at a tangent. He might buy a motor-car, he might buy one of these here things that will play you a piano-that would make old Buggins sit up! He could pretend he had learnt to play-he might buy a bicycle and a cyclist suit .... A terrific multitude of plans of what he might do, and in particular of what he might buy, came crowding into his brain, and he did not so much fall asleep as pass into a disorder of dreams in which he was driving a four-horse Tip-Top coach down Sandgate Hill ('I shall have to be precious careful'), wearing innumerable suits of clothes, and through some terrible accident wearing them all wrong. Consequently, he was being laughed at. what is coach vanished in what is interest of what is costume. He was wearing golfing suits and a silk hat. This passed into a nightmare that he was promenading on what is Leas in a Highland costume, with a kilt that kept shrinking, and Shalford was following him with three policemen. `He's my assistant,' Shalford kept repeating; `he's escaped. He's an escaped Improver. Keep by him, and in a minute you'll have to run him in. I know 'em. We say they wash but they won't.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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