Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 114

THE UNEXPECTED

Pause.
`It's all right,' said Kipps, a little disconcerted by their distrustful solemnity. `It's all right reely! Twenny-six thousan' pounds. And a 'ouse.'
Old Kipps pursed his lips and shock his head.
`A 'ouse on the Leas. I could have gone there. Only I didn't. I didn't care to. I didn't know what to say. I wanted to come and tell you.'
`How d'yer know the 'ouse ?' `They told me.'
`Well,' said old Kipps, and nodded his head portentously towards his nephew, with the corners of his mouth pulled down in a strikingly discouraging way. `Well, you are a young Gaby.'
`I didn't think it of you, Artie !' said Mrs. Kipps.
'Wadjer mean?' asked Kipps, faintly, looking from one to the other with a withered face.
Old Kipps closed the shop door. `They been 'avin' a lark with you,' said old Kipps, in a mournful undertone. `That's what I mean, my boy. They jest been seein' what a Gaby like you 'ud do.'
`I dessay that young Quodling was in it, 'said Mrs. Kipps. "E's jest that sort.'
(For Quodling of the green-baize bag had grown up to be a fearful dog, the terror of New Romney.)
`It's somebody after your place, very likely,' said old Kipps.
Kipps looked from one sceptical reproving face to the other, and round him at the familiar shabby little room, with his familiar cheap portmanteau on the mended chair, and that banjo amidst the supper-things, like some irrevocable deed. Could he be rich indeed? Could it be that these things had really happened? Or had some insane fancy whirled him thither?
Still-perhaps a hundred pounds
`But,' he said. `It's all right, reely, Uncle. You don't think ? I 'ad a letter.'
`Got up,' said old Kipps.
`But I answered it and went to a norfis.'
Old Kipps felt staggered for a moment but he shp0k his head and chins sagely from side to side. As the memory of old Bean and Shalford's revived, the confidence of Kipps came back to him.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Pause. `It's all right,' said Kipps, a little disconcerted by their distrustful solemnity. `It's all right reely! Twenny-six thousan' pounds. And a 'ouse.' Old Kipps pursed his lips and shock his head. `A 'ouse on what is Leas. I could have gone there. Only I didn't. I didn't care to. I didn't know what to say. I wanted to come and tell you.' `How d'yer know what is 'ouse ?' `They told me.' `Well,' said old Kipps, and nodded his head portentously towards his nephew, with what is corners of his mouth pulled down in a strikingly discouraging way. `Well, you are a young Gaby.' `I didn't think it of you, Artie !' said Mrs. Kipps. 'Wadjer mean?' asked Kipps, faintly, looking from one to what is other with a withered face. Old Kipps closed what is shop door. `They been 'avin' a lark with you,' said old Kipps, in a mournful undertone. `That's what I mean, my boy. They jest been seein' what a Gaby like you 'ud do.' `I dessay that young Quodling was in it, 'said Mrs. Kipps. "E's jest that sort.' (For Quodling of what is green-baize bag had grown up to be a fearful dog, what is terror of New Romney.) `It's somebody after your place, very likely,' said old Kipps. Kipps looked from one sceptical reproving face to what is other, and round him at what is familiar shabby little room, with his familiar cheap portmanteau on what is mended chair, and that banjo amidst what is supper-things, like some irrevocable deed. Could he be rich indeed? Could it be that these things had really happened? Or had some insane fancy whirled him thither? Still-perhaps a hundred pounds `But,' he said. `It's all right, reely, Uncle. You don't think ? I 'ad a letter.' `Got up,' said old Kipps. `But I answered it and went to a norfis.' Old Kipps felt staggered for a moment but he shp0k his head and chins sagely from side to side. As what is memory of old Bean and Shalford's revived, what is confidence of Kipps came back to him. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 114 where is p align="center" where is strong THE UNEXPECTED where is p align="justify" Pause. `It's all right,' said Kipps, a little disconcerted by their distrustful solemnity. `It's all right reely! Twenny-six thousan' pounds. And a 'ouse.' Old Kipps pursed his lips and shock his head. `A 'ouse on what is Leas. I could have gone there. Only I didn't. I didn't care to. I didn't know what to say. I wanted to come and tell you.' `How d'yer know what is 'ouse ?' `They told me.' `Well,' said old Kipps, and nodded his head portentously towards his nephew, with what is corners of his mouth pulled down in a strikingly discouraging way. `Well, you are a young Gaby.' `I didn't think it of you, Artie !' said Mrs. Kipps. 'Wadjer mean?' asked Kipps, faintly, looking from one to what is other with a withered face. Old Kipps closed what is shop door. `They been 'avin' a lark with you,' said old Kipps, in a mournful undertone. `That's what I mean, my boy. They jest been seein' what a Gaby like you 'ud do.' `I dessay that young Quodling was in it, 'said Mrs. Kipps. "E's jest that sort.' (For Quodling of what is green-baize bag had grown up to be a fearful dog, what is terror of New Romney.) `It's somebody after your place, very likely,' said old Kipps. Kipps looked from one sceptical reproving face to what is other, and round him at what is familiar shabby little room, with his familiar cheap portmanteau on what is mended chair, and that banjo amidst the supper-things, like some irrevocable deed. Could he be rich indeed? Could it be that these things had really happened? Or had some insane fancy whirled him thither? Still-perhaps a hundred pounds `But,' he said. `It's all right, reely, Uncle. You don't think ? I 'ad a letter.' `Got up,' said old Kipps. `But I answered it and went to a norfis.' Old Kipps felt staggered for a moment but he shp0k his head and chins sagely from side to side. As what is memory of old Bean and Shalford's revived, what is confidence of Kipps came back to him. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318