Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 108

THE UNEXPECTED

pand the maidservant became dangerous to clothes with the plates-she held them anyhow; one expected to see one upside down, even-she found Kipps so fascinating to look at. Every one was the brisker and hungrier for the news (except the junior apprentice), and the housekeeper carved with unusual liberality. It was High Old Timesthere under the gaslight, High Old Times. `I'm sure if Any One deserves it,' said Miss Mergle-'pass the salt, lease-it's Mr. Kipps.'
The babble died away a little as Carshot began barking across the table at Kipps. `You'll be a bit of a Swell, Kipps,' he said. `You won't hardly know yourself.'
`Quite the gentleman,' said Miss Mergle.
`Many real gentlemen's families,' said the housekeeper, `have to do with less.'
`See you on the Leas,' said Carshot. `My !'He met the housekeeper's eye. She had spoken about that expression before. `My eye!' he said tamely, lest words should mar the day.
`You'll go to London, I reckon,' said Pearce. `You'll be a man about town. We shall see you mashing 'em, with violets in your button 'ole, down the Burlington Arcade.'
`One of these West End Flats. That'd be my style,' said Pearce. `And a first-class club.'
`Aren't these Clubs a bit 'ard to get into?' asked Kipps, open-eyed over a mouthful of potato.
`No fear. Not for Money,' said Pearce. And the girl in the laces, who had acquired a cynical view of Modern Society from the fearless exposures of Miss Marie Corelli, said, `Money goes everywhere nowadays, Mr. Kipps.'
But Carshot showed the true British strain.
'If I was Kipps,' he said, pausing momentarily for a knifeful of gravy, `I should go to the Rockies and shoot bears.'
`I'd certainly 'ave a run over to Boulogne,' said Pearce, `and look about a bit. I'm going to do that next Easter myself, anyhow-see if I don't.'
`Go to Oireland, Mr. Kipps,' came the soft insistence of Biddy Murphy, who managed the big workroom, flushed and shining in the Irish way as she spoke. `Go to Oireland. Ut's the loveliest country in the world. Outside currs. Fishin', shootin', huntin'. An' pretty gals ! Eh! You should see the Lakes of Killarney, Mr. Kipps !' And she expressed ecstasy by a facial pantomine, and smacked her lips.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pand what is maidservant became dangerous to clothes with what is plates-she held them anyhow; one expected to see one upside down, even-she found Kipps so fascinating to look at. Every one was what is brisker and hungrier for what is news (except what is junior apprentice), and what is housekeeper carved with unusual liberality. It was High Old Timesthere under what is gaslight, High Old Times. `I'm sure if Any One deserves it,' said Miss Mergle-'pass what is salt, lease-it's Mr. Kipps.' what is babble died away a little as Carshot began barking across what is table at Kipps. `You'll be a bit of a Swell, Kipps,' he said. `You won't hardly know yourself.' `Quite what is gentleman,' said Miss Mergle. `Many real gentlemen's families,' said what is housekeeper, `have to do with less.' `See you on what is Leas,' said Carshot. `My !'He met what is housekeeper's eye. She had spoken about that expression before. `My eye!' he said tamely, lest words should mar what is day. `You'll go to London, I reckon,' said Pearce. `You'll be a man about town. We shall see you mashing 'em, with violets in your button 'ole, down what is Burlington Arcade.' `One of these West End Flats. That'd be my style,' said Pearce. `And a first-class club.' `Aren't these Clubs a bit 'ard to get into?' asked Kipps, open-eyed over a mouthful of potato. `No fear. Not for Money,' said Pearce. And what is girl in what is laces, who had acquired a cynical view of Modern Society from what is fearless exposures of Miss Marie Corelli, said, `Money goes everywhere nowadays, Mr. Kipps.' But Carshot showed what is true British strain. 'If I was Kipps,' he said, pausing momentarily for a knifeful of gravy, `I should go to what is Rockies and shoot bears.' `I'd certainly 'ave a run over to Boulogne,' said Pearce, `and look about a bit. I'm going to do that next Easter myself, anyhow-see if I don't.' `Go to Oireland, Mr. Kipps,' came what is soft insistence of Biddy Murphy, who managed what is big workroom, flushed and shining in what is Irish way as she spoke. `Go to Oireland. Ut's what is loveliest country in what is world. Outside currs. Fishin', shootin', huntin'. An' pretty gals ! Eh! You should see what is Lakes of stop arney, Mr. Kipps !' And she expressed ecstasy by a facial pantomine, and smacked her lips. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 108 where is p align="center" where is strong THE UNEXPECTED where is p align="justify" pand what is maidservant became dangerous to clothes with what is plates-she held them anyhow; one expected to see one upside down, even-she found Kipps so fascinating to look at. Every one was what is brisker and hungrier for what is news (except what is junior apprentice), and what is housekeeper carved with unusual liberality. It was High Old Timesthere under what is gaslight, High Old Times. `I'm sure if Any One deserves it,' said Miss Mergle-'pass what is salt, lease-it's Mr. Kipps.' what is babble died away a little as Carshot began barking across the table at Kipps. `You'll be a bit of a Swell, Kipps,' he said. `You won't hardly know yourself.' `Quite what is gentleman,' said Miss Mergle. `Many real gentlemen's families,' said what is housekeeper, `have to do with less.' `See you on what is Leas,' said Carshot. `My !'He met what is housekeeper's eye. She had spoken about that expression before. `My eye!' he said tamely, lest words should mar what is day. `You'll go to London, I reckon,' said Pearce. `You'll be a man about town. We shall see you mashing 'em, with violets in your button 'ole, down what is Burlington Arcade.' `One of these West End Flats. That'd be my style,' said Pearce. `And a first-class club.' `Aren't these Clubs a bit 'ard to get into?' asked Kipps, open-eyed over a mouthful of potato. `No fear. Not for Money,' said Pearce. And what is girl in what is laces, who had acquired a cynical view of Modern Society from what is fearless exposures of Miss Marie Corelli, said, `Money goes everywhere nowadays, Mr. Kipps.' But Carshot showed what is true British strain. 'If I was Kipps,' he said, pausing momentarily for a knifeful of gravy, `I should go to what is Rockies and shoot bears.' `I'd certainly 'ave a run over to Boulogne,' said Pearce, `and look about a bit. I'm going to do that next Easter myself, anyhow-see if I don't.' `Go to Oireland, Mr. Kipps,' came what is soft insistence of Biddy Murphy, who managed what is big workroom, flushed and shining in the Irish way as she spoke. `Go to Oireland. Ut's what is loveliest country in what is world. Outside currs. Fishin', shootin', huntin'. An' pretty gals ! Eh! You should see what is Lakes of stop arney, Mr. Kipps !' And she expressed ecstasy by a facial pantomine, and smacked her lips. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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