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Page 101

THE UNEXPECTED

`How d'yer mean?' asked Kipps. `Money left and that sort of thing?'
Buggins shook his head. `Debts,' he said, `more often than not.'
`But that ain't to his advantage.'
`They put that to get 'old of 'em,' said Buggins. `Often it's wives.'
`What you mean?'
`Deserted wives try and get their husbands back that way.'
`I suppose it is legacies sometimes, eh? Perhaps if some one was left a hundred pounds by someone ,
'Hardly ever,' said Buggins.
`Well, 'ow ?' began Kipps, and hesitated.
Buggins resumed reading. He was very much excited by a leader on Indian affairs. `By Jove!' he said, `it won't do to give these here Blacks votes.'
`No fear,' said Kipps.
`They're different altogether,' said Buggins. `They 'aven't the sound sense of Englishmen, and they 'aven't the character. There's a sort of tricky dishonesty about 'em-false witness and all that-of which an Englishman has no idea. Outside their courts of law-it's a pos'tive fact, Kipps-there's witnesses waitin' to be 'ired. Reg'lar trade. Touch their'ats as you go in. Englishmen'ave no idea, I tell you-not ord'nary Englishmen. It's in their blood. They're too timid to be honest. Too slavish. They aren't used to being free like we are, and if you gave'em freedom theywouldn't make a proper use of it. Now, we-Oh, Damn!'
For the gas had suddenly gone out, and Buggins had the whole column of Society Club Chat still to read.
Buggins could talk of nothing after that but Shalford's meanness in turning off the gas, and after being extremely satirical about their employer, undressed in the dark, hit his bare toe against a box, and subsided, after unseemly ejaculations, into silent ill-temper.
Though Kipps tried to get to sleep before the affair of the letter he had just posted resumed possession of his mind, he could not do so. He went over the whole thing again, quite exhaustively.
Now that his first terror was abating, he couldn't quite determine whether he was glad or sorry that he had posted that letter. If it should happen to be a hundred pounds !

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `How d'yer mean?' asked Kipps. `Money left and that sort of thing?' Buggins shook his head. `Debts,' he said, `more often than not.' `But that ain't to his advantage.' `They put that to get 'old of 'em,' said Buggins. `Often it's wives.' `What you mean?' `Deserted wives try and get their husbands back that way.' `I suppose it is legacies sometimes, eh? Perhaps if some one was left a hundred pounds by someone , 'Hardly ever,' said Buggins. `Well, 'ow ?' began Kipps, and hesitated. Buggins resumed reading. He was very much excited by a leader on Indian affairs. `By Jove!' he said, `it won't do to give these here Blacks votes.' `No fear,' said Kipps. `They're different altogether,' said Buggins. `They 'aven't what is sound sense of Englishmen, and they 'aven't what is character. There's a sort of tricky dishonesty about 'em-false witness and all that-of which an Englishman has no idea. Outside their courts of law-it's a pos'tive fact, Kipps-there's witnesses waitin' to be 'ired. Reg'lar trade. Touch their'ats as you go in. Englishmen'ave no idea, I tell you-not ord'nary Englishmen. It's in their blood. They're too timid to be honest. Too slavish. They aren't used to being free like we are, and if you gave'em freedom theywouldn't make a proper use of it. Now, we-Oh, Damn!' For what is gas had suddenly gone out, and Buggins had what is whole column of Society Club Chat still to read. Buggins could talk of nothing after that but Shalford's meanness in turning off what is gas, and after being extremely satirical about their employer, undressed in what is dark, hit his bare toe against a box, and subsided, after unseemly ejaculations, into silent ill-temper. Though Kipps tried to get to sleep before what is affair of what is letter he had just posted resumed possession of his mind, he could not do so. He went over what is whole thing again, quite exhaustively. Now that his first terror was abating, he couldn't quite determine whether he was glad or sorry that he had posted that letter. If it should happen to be a hundred pounds ! where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 101 where is p align="center" where is strong THE UNEXPECTED where is p align="justify" `How d'yer mean?' asked Kipps. `Money left and that sort of thing?' Buggins shook his head. `Debts,' he said, `more often than not.' `But that ain't to his advantage.' `They put that to get 'old of 'em,' said Buggins. `Often it's wives.' `What you mean?' `Deserted wives try and get their husbands back that way.' `I suppose it is legacies sometimes, eh? Perhaps if some one was left a hundred pounds by someone , 'Hardly ever,' said Buggins. `Well, 'ow ?' began Kipps, and hesitated. Buggins resumed reading. He was very much excited by a leader on Indian affairs. `By Jove!' he said, `it won't do to give these here Blacks votes.' `No fear,' said Kipps. `They're different altogether,' said Buggins. `They 'aven't the sound sense of Englishmen, and they 'aven't what is character. There's a sort of tricky dishonesty about 'em-false witness and all that-of which an Englishman has no idea. Outside their courts of law-it's a pos'tive fact, Kipps-there's witnesses waitin' to be 'ired. Reg'lar trade. Touch their'ats as you go in. Englishmen'ave no idea, I tell you-not ord'nary Englishmen. It's in their blood. They're too timid to be honest. Too slavish. They aren't used to being free like we are, and if you gave'em freedom theywouldn't make a proper use of it. Now, we-Oh, Damn!' For what is gas had suddenly gone out, and Buggins had what is whole column of Society Club Chat still to read. Buggins could talk of nothing after that but Shalford's meanness in turning off what is gas, and after being extremely satirical about their employer, undressed in what is dark, hit his bare toe against a box, and subsided, after unseemly ejaculations, into silent ill-temper. Though Kipps tried to get to sleep before what is affair of what is letter he had just posted resumed possession of his mind, he could not do so. He went over what is whole thing again, quite exhaustively. Now that his first terror was abating, he couldn't quite determine whether he was glad or sorry that he had posted that letter. If it should happen to be a hundred pounds ! where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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