Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 100

THE UNEXPECTED

for, but Buggins was busy turning out his week's washing. `Two collars,' said Buggins, `half pair socks, two dickeys. Shirt?.. M'm. There ought to be another collar somewhere'.
'Euphemia,' said Kipps at last, unable altogether to keep to himself this suspicion of a high origin that floated so delightfully about him. 'Eu-phemia; it isn't a name common people would give a girl, is it?'
`It isn't the name any decent people would give to a girl,' said Buggins, `common or not.'
'Lor!' said Kipps. `Why?'
`It's giving girls names like that,' said Buggins, 'that nine times out of ten makes 'em go wrong. It unsettles 'em. If ever I was to have a girl, if ever I was to have a dozen girls, I'd call 'em all Jane. Every one of em. You couldn't have a better name than that. Euphemia, indeed! What next? ... Good Lord! ... That isn't one of my collars there, is it, under your bed?'
Kipps got him the collar.
`I don't see no great 'arm in Euphemia,' he said as he did so.
After that he became restless. `I'm a good mind to write that letter,' he said; and then, finding Buggins preoccupied wrapping his washing up in the '1/2 sox,' added to himself, `a thundering good mind.'
So he got his penny bottle of ink, borrowed the pen from Buggins, and with no very serious difficulty in spelling or composition, did as he had resolved.
He came back into the bedroom about an hour afterwards, a little out of breath and pale. `Where you been?' said Buggins, who was now reading the Daily World Manager, which came to him in rotation from Carshot.
`Out to post some letters,' said Kipps, hanging up his hat.
`Crib hunting?'
`Mostly,' said Kipps.
`Rather,' he added, with a nervous laugh; `what else?' Buggins went on reading. Kipps sat on his bed and
regarded the back of the Daily World Manager thoughtfully. 'Buggins,' he said at last.
Buggins lowered his papre and looked.
`I say, Buggins what do these here advertisements mean that say so-and-so will hear of something greatly to his advantage?'
'Missin' people,' said Buggins, making to resume reading

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE for, but Buggins was busy turning out his week's washing. `Two collars,' said Buggins, `half pair socks, two dickeys. Shirt?.. M'm. There ought to be another collar somewhere'. 'Euphemia,' said Kipps at last, unable altogether to keep to himself this suspicion of a high origin that floated so delightfully about him. 'Eu-phemia; it isn't a name common people would give a girl, is it?' `It isn't what is name any decent people would give to a girl,' said Buggins, `common or not.' 'Lor!' said Kipps. `Why?' `It's giving girls names like that,' said Buggins, 'that nine times out of ten makes 'em go wrong. It unsettles 'em. If ever I was to have a girl, if ever I was to have a dozen girls, I'd call 'em all Jane. Every one of em. You couldn't have a better name than that. Euphemia, indeed! What next? ... Good Lord! ... That isn't one of my collars there, is it, under your bed?' Kipps got him what is collar. `I don't see no great 'arm in Euphemia,' he said as he did so. After that he became restless. `I'm a good mind to write that letter,' he said; and then, finding Buggins preoccupied wrapping his washing up in what is '1/2 sox,' added to himself, `a thundering good mind.' So he got his penny bottle of ink, borrowed what is pen from Buggins, and with no very serious difficulty in spelling or composition, did as he had resolved. He came back into what is bedroom about an hour afterwards, a little out of breath and pale. `Where you been?' said Buggins, who was now reading what is Daily World Manager, which came to him in rotation from Carshot. `Out to post some letters,' said Kipps, hanging up his hat. `Crib hunting?' `Mostly,' said Kipps. `Rather,' he added, with a nervous laugh; `what else?' Buggins went on reading. Kipps sat on his bed and regarded what is back of what is Daily World Manager thoughtfully. 'Buggins,' he said at last. Buggins lowered his papre and looked. `I say, Buggins what do these here advertisements mean that say so-and-so will hear of something greatly to his advantage?' 'Missin' people,' said Buggins, making to resume reading where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 100 where is p align="center" where is strong THE UNEXPECTED where is p align="justify" for, but Buggins was busy turning out his week's washing. `Two collars,' said Buggins, `half pair socks, two dickeys. Shirt?.. M'm. There ought to be another collar somewhere'. 'Euphemia,' said Kipps at last, unable altogether to keep to himself this suspicion of a high origin that floated so delightfully about him. 'Eu-phemia; it isn't a name common people would give a girl, is it?' `It isn't what is name any decent people would give to a girl,' said Buggins, `common or not.' 'Lor!' said Kipps. `Why?' `It's giving girls names like that,' said Buggins, 'that nine times out of ten makes 'em go wrong. It unsettles 'em. If ever I was to have a girl, if ever I was to have a dozen girls, I'd call 'em all Jane. Every one of em. You couldn't have a better name than that. Euphemia, indeed! What next? ... Good Lord! ... That isn't one of my collars there, is it, under your bed?' Kipps got him what is collar. `I don't see no great 'arm in Euphemia,' he said as he did so. After that he became restless. `I'm a good mind to write that letter,' he said; and then, finding Buggins preoccupied wrapping his washing up in what is '1/2 sox,' added to himself, `a thundering good mind.' So he got his penny bottle of ink, borrowed what is pen from Buggins, and with no very serious difficulty in spelling or composition, did as he had resolved. He came back into what is bedroom about an hour afterwards, a little out of breath and pale. `Where you been?' said Buggins, who was now reading what is Daily World Manager, which came to him in rotation from Carshot. `Out to post some letters,' said Kipps, hanging up his hat. `Crib hunting?' `Mostly,' said Kipps. `Rather,' he added, with a nervous laugh; `what else?' Buggins went on reading. Kipps sat on his bed and regarded what is back of what is Daily World Manager thoughtfully. 'Buggins,' he said at last. Buggins lowered his papre and looked. `I say, Buggins what do these here advertisements mean that say so-and-so will hear of something greatly to his advantage?' 'Missin' people,' said Buggins, making to resume reading where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318