Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 091

'SWAPPED'

contemplation of the `key of the street' that Shalford had presented him.

§ 3
This sort of thing was all very well when junior apprentices were about, but when Kipps was alone with himself it served him not at all. He was uncomfortable inside, and his skin was uncomfortable, and the Head and Mouth, palliated, perhaps, but certainly not cured, were still with him. He felt, to tell the truth, nasty and dirty, and extremely disgusted with himself. To work was dreadful, and to stand still and think still more dreadful. His patched knee reproached him. These were the second best of his three pairs of trousers, and they had cost him thirteen and sixpence. Practically ruined they were. His dusting pair was unfit for shop, and he would have to degrade his best. When he was under inspection he affected the slouch of a desperado, but directly he found himself alone, this passed insensibly into the droop.
The financial aspect of things grew large before him. His whole capital in the world was the sum of five pounds in the Post Office Savings Bank, and four and sixpence cash. Besides, there would be two months' `screw.' His little tin box upstairs was no longer big enough for his belongings, he would have to buy another, let alone that it was not calculated to make a good impression in a new `crib.' Then there would be paper and stamps needed in some abundance for answering advertisements and railway fares when he went `crib hunting.' He would have to Write letters, and he never wrote letters. There was spelling, for example, to consider. Probably if nothing turned up before his month was up, he would have to go home to his Uncle and Aunt.
How would they take it? ...
For the present, at any rate, he resolved not to write to them.
Such disagreeable things as this it was that lurked below the fair surface of Kipps' assertion, `I been wanting a change. If'e 'adn't swapped me, I should very likely 'ave swapped 'im.'
In the perplexed privacies of his own mind he could not understand how everything had happened. He had been

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE contemplation of what is `key of what is street' that Shalford had presented him. § 3 This sort of thing was all very well when junior apprentices were about, but when Kipps was alone with himself it served him not at all. He was uncomfortable inside, and his skin was uncomfortable, and what is Head and Mouth, palliated, perhaps, but certainly not cured, were still with him. He felt, to tell what is truth, nasty and dirty, and extremely disgusted with himself. To work was dreadful, and to stand still and think still more dreadful. His patched knee reproached him. These were what is second best of his three pairs of trousers, and they had cost him thirteen and sixpence. Practically ruined they were. His dusting pair was unfit for shop, and he would have to degrade his best. When he was under inspection he affected what is slouch of a desperado, but directly he found himself alone, this passed insensibly into what is droop. what is financial aspect of things grew large before him. His whole capital in what is world was what is sum of five pounds in what is Post Office Savings Bank, and four and sixpence cash. Besides, there would be two months' `screw.' His little tin box upstairs was no longer big enough for his belongings, he would have to buy another, let alone that it was not calculated to make a good impression in a new `crib.' Then there would be paper and stamps needed in some abundance for answering advertisements and railway fares when he went `crib hunting.' He would have to Write letters, and he never wrote letters. There was spelling, for example, to consider. Probably if nothing turned up before his month was up, he would have to go home to his Uncle and Aunt. How would they take it? ... For what is present, at any rate, he resolved not to write to them. Such disagreeable things as this it was that lurked below what is fair surface of Kipps' assertion, `I been wanting a change. If'e 'adn't swapped me, I should very likely 'ave swapped 'im.' In what is perplexed privacies of his own mind he could not understand how everything had happened. He had been where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 091 where is p align="center" where is strong 'SWAPPED' where is p align="justify" contemplation of what is `key of what is street' that Shalford had presented him. where is strong § 3 This sort of thing was all very well when junior apprentices were about, but when Kipps was alone with himself it served him not at all. He was uncomfortable inside, and his skin was uncomfortable, and what is Head and Mouth, palliated, perhaps, but certainly not cured, were still with him. He felt, to tell what is truth, nasty and dirty, and extremely disgusted with himself. To work was dreadful, and to stand still and think still more dreadful. His patched knee reproached him. These were what is second best of his three pairs of trousers, and they had cost him thirteen and sixpence. Practically ruined they were. His dusting pair was unfit for shop, and he would have to degrade his best. When he was under inspection he affected what is slouch of a desperado, but directly he found himself alone, this passed insensibly into what is droop. what is financial aspect of things grew large before him. His whole capital in what is world was what is sum of five pounds in what is Post Office Savings Bank, and four and sixpence cash. Besides, there would be two months' `screw.' His little tin box upstairs was no longer big enough for his belongings, he would have to buy another, let alone that it was not calculated to make a good impression in a new `crib.' Then there would be paper and stamps needed in some abundance for answering advertisements and railway fares when he went `crib hunting.' He would have to Write letters, and he never wrote letters. There was spelling, for example, to consider. Probably if nothing turned up before his month was up, he would have to go home to his Uncle and Aunt. How would they take it? ... For what is present, at any rate, he resolved not to write to them. Such disagreeable things as this it was that lurked below what is fair surface of Kipps' assertion, `I been wanting a change. If'e 'adn't swapped me, I should very likely 'ave swapped 'im.' In what is perplexed privacies of his own mind he could not understand how everything had happened. He had been where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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