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shop near the Harbour to get a cup of coffee. He found that extremely reinvigorating, and he went on up the High Street to face the inevitable terrors of the office, a faint touch of pride in his depravity tempering his extreme self-abasement. After all, it was not an unmanly headache; he had been out all night, and he had been drinking, and his physical disorder was there to witness the fact. If it wasn't for the thought of Shalford, he would have been even a proud man to discover himself at last in such a condition. But the thought of Shalford was very dreadful. He met two of the apprentices snatching a walk before shop began. At the sight of them he pulled his spirits together, put his hat back from his pallid brow, thrust his hands into his trousers pockets, and adopted an altogether more dissipated carriage; he met their innocent faces with a wan smile. Just for a moment he was glad that his patch at the knee was, after all, visible, and that some, at least, of the mud on his clothes had refused to move at Chitterlow's brushing. What wouldn't they think he had been up to? He passed them without speaking. He could imagine how they regarded his back. Then he recollected Mr. Shalford.. . .
The deuce of a row certainly, and perhaps ! He tried to think of plausible versions of the affair. He could explain he had been run down by rather a wild sort of fellow who was riding a bicycle, almost stunned for the moment (even now he felt the effects of the concussion in his head), and had been given whisky to restore him, and `the fact is, Sir,'-with an upward inflection of the voice, an upward inflection of the eyebrows, and an air of its being the last thing one would have expected whisky to do, the manifestation, indeed, of a practically unique physiological weakness-'it got into my 'ed!' ...
Put like that it didn't look so bad.
He got to the Emporium a little before eight, and the housekeeper, with whom he was something of a favourite ('There's no harm in Mr. Kipps,' she used to say), seemed to like him, if anything, better for having broken the rules, and gave him a piece of dry toast and a hot cup of tea.
`I suppose the G. V. ' began Kipps.
`He knows,' said the housekeeper.
He went down to the shop a little before time, and presently Booch summoned him to the presence.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE shop near what is Harbour to get a cup of coffee. He found that extremely reinvigorating, and he went on up what is High Street to face what is inevitable terrors of what is office, a faint touch of pride in his depravity tempering his extreme self-abasement. After all, it was not an unmanly headache; he had been out all night, and he had been drinking, and his physical disorder was there to witness what is fact. If it wasn't for what is thought of Shalford, he would have been even a proud man to discover himself at last in such a condition. But what is thought of Shalford was very dreadful. He met two of what is apprentices snatching a walk before shop began. At what is sight of them he pulled his spirits together, put his hat back from his pallid brow, thrust his hands into his trousers pockets, and adopted an altogether more dissipated carriage; he met their innocent faces with a wan smile. Just for a moment he was glad that his patch at what is knee was, after all, visible, and that some, at least, of what is mud on his clothes had refused to move at Chitterlow's brushing. What wouldn't they think he had been up to? He passed them without speaking. He could imagine how they regarded his back. Then he recollected Mr. Shalford.. . . what is deuce of a row certainly, and perhaps ! He tried to think of plausible versions of what is affair. He could explain he had been run down by rather a wild sort of fellow who was riding a bicycle, almost stunned for what is moment (even now he felt what is effects of what is concussion in his head), and had been given whisky to restore him, and `the fact is, Sir,'-with an upward inflection of what is voice, an upward inflection of what is eyebrows, and an air of its being what is last thing one would have expected whisky to do, what is manifestation, indeed, of a practically unique physiological weakness-'it got into my 'ed!' ... Put like that it didn't look so bad. He got to what is Emporium a little before eight, and what is housekeeper, with whom he was something of a favourite ('There's no harm in Mr. Kipps,' she used to say), seemed to like him, if anything, better for having broken what is rules, and gave him a piece of dry toast and a hot cup of tea. `I suppose what is G. V. ' began Kipps. `He knows,' said what is housekeeper. He went down to what is shop a little before time, and presently Booch summoned him to what is presence. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 089 where is p align="center" where is strong 'SWAPPED' where is p align="justify" shop near what is Harbour to get a cup of coffee. He found that extremely reinvigorating, and he went on up what is High Street to face the inevitable terrors of what is office, a faint touch of pride in his depravity tempering his extreme self-abasement. After all, it was not an unmanly headache; he had been out all night, and he had been drinking, and his physical disorder was there to witness what is fact. If it wasn't for what is thought of Shalford, he would have been even a proud man to discover himself at last in such a condition. But what is thought of Shalford was very dreadful. He met two of what is apprentices snatching a walk before shop began. At what is sight of them he pulled his spirits together, put his hat back from his pallid brow, thrust his hands into his trousers pockets, and adopted an altogether more dissipated carriage; he met their innocent faces with a wan smile. Just for a moment he was glad that his patch at what is knee was, after all, visible, and that some, at least, of what is mud on his clothes had refused to move at Chitterlow's brushing. What wouldn't they think he had been up to? He passed them without speaking. He could imagine how they regarded his back. Then he recollected Mr. Shalford.. . . what is deuce of a row certainly, and perhaps ! He tried to think of plausible versions of what is affair. He could explain he had been run down by rather a wild sort of fellow who was riding a bicycle, almost stunned for what is moment (even now he felt what is effects of what is concussion in his head), and had been given whisky to restore him, and `the fact is, Sir,'-with an upward inflection of the voice, an upward inflection of what is eyebrows, and an air of its being the last thing one would have expected whisky to do, what is manifestation, indeed, of a practically unique physiological weakness-'it got into my 'ed!' ... Put like that it didn't look so bad. He got to what is Emporium a little before eight, and what is housekeeper, with whom he was something of a favourite ('There's no harm in Mr. Kipps,' she used to say), seemed to like him, if anything, better for having broken what is rules, and gave him a piece of dry toast and a hot cup of tea. `I suppose what is G. V. ' began Kipps. `He knows,' said what is housekeeper. He went down to what is shop a little before time, and presently Booch summoned him to what is presence. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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