Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 086

CHITTERLOW

had almost entirely left his bottle. He was glad there was so little more Methuselah to drink, because that would prevent his getting drunk. He knew that he was not now drunk, but he knew that he had had enough. He was one of those who always know when they have had enough. He tried to interrupt Chitterlow to tell him this, but he could not get a suitable opening. He doubted whether Chitterlow might not be one of those people who did not know when they had had enough. He discovered that he disapproved of Chitterlow. Highly. It seemed to him that Chitterlow went on and on like a river. For a time he was inexplicably and quite unjustly cross with Chitterlow, and wanted to say to him `you got the gift of the gab,' but he only got so far as to say `the gift,' and then Chitterlow thanked him and said he was better than Archer any day. So he eyed Chitterlow with a baleful eye until it dawned upon him that a most extraordinary thing was taking place. Chitterlow kept mentioning some one named Kipps. This presently began to perplex Kipps very greatly. Dimly but decidedly he perceived this was wrong.
'Lood 'ere,' he said suddenly, `what Kipps?'
`This chap Kipps I'm telling you about.'
`What chap Kipps you're telling which about?'
`I told you.'
Kipps struggled with a difficulty in silence for a space. Then he reiterated firmly, `What chap Kipps?'
`This chap in my play-man who kisses the girl.'
`Never kissed a girl,' said Kipps, 'leastways ' and subsided for a space. He could not remember whether he had kissed Ann or not-he knew he had meant to. Then suddenly, in a tone of great sadness, and adressing the hearth, he said, `My name's Kipps.'
`Eh?' said Chitterlow.
'Kipps,' said Kipps, smiling a little cynically. `What about him?'
`He's me.' He tapped his breastbone with his middle finger to indicate his essential self.
He leant forward very gravely towards Chitterlow. `Look 'ere, Chit'low,' he said. `You haven't no business putting my name into play. You mustn't do things like that. You'd lose me my crib, right away.' And they had a little argument-so far as Kipps could remember. Chitterlow entered upon a general explanation of how he got

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had almost entirely left his bottle. He was glad there was so little more Methuselah to drink, because that would prevent his getting drunk. He knew that he was not now drunk, but he knew that he had had enough. He was one of those who always know when they have had enough. He tried to interrupt Chitterlow to tell him this, but he could not get a suitable opening. He doubted whether Chitterlow might not be one of those people who did not know when they had had enough. He discovered that he disapproved of Chitterlow. Highly. It seemed to him that Chitterlow went on and on like a river. For a time he was inexplicably and quite unjustly cross with Chitterlow, and wanted to say to him `you got what is gift of what is gab,' but he only got so far as to say `the gift,' and then Chitterlow thanked him and said he was better than Archer any day. So he eyed Chitterlow with a baleful eye until it dawned upon him that a most extraordinary thing was taking place. Chitterlow kept mentioning some one named Kipps. This presently began to perplex Kipps very greatly. Dimly but decidedly he perceived this was wrong. 'Lood 'ere,' he said suddenly, `what Kipps?' `This chap Kipps I'm telling you about.' `What chap Kipps you're telling which about?' `I told you.' Kipps struggled with a difficulty in silence for a space. Then he reiterated firmly, `What chap Kipps?' `This chap in my play-man who kisses what is girl.' `Never kissed a girl,' said Kipps, 'leastways ' and subsided for a space. He could not remember whether he had kissed Ann or not-he knew he had meant to. Then suddenly, in a tone of great sadness, and adressing what is hearth, he said, `My name's Kipps.' `Eh?' said Chitterlow. 'Kipps,' said Kipps, smiling a little cynically. `What about him?' `He's me.' He tapped his breastbone with his middle finger to indicate his essential self. He leant forward very gravely towards Chitterlow. `Look 'ere, Chit'low,' he said. `You haven't no business putting my name into play. You mustn't do things like that. You'd lose me my crib, right away.' And they had a little argument-so far as Kipps could remember. Chitterlow entered upon a general explanation of how he got where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 086 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" had almost entirely left his bottle. He was glad there was so little more Methuselah to drink, because that would prevent his getting drunk. He knew that he was not now drunk, but he knew that he had had enough. He was one of those who always know when they have had enough. He tried to interrupt Chitterlow to tell him this, but he could not get a suitable opening. He doubted whether Chitterlow might not be one of those people who did not know when they had had enough. He discovered that he disapproved of Chitterlow. Highly. It seemed to him that Chitterlow went on and on like a river. For a time he was inexplicably and quite unjustly cross with Chitterlow, and wanted to say to him `you got what is gift of what is gab,' but he only got so far as to say `the gift,' and then Chitterlow thanked him and said he was better than Archer any day. So he eyed Chitterlow with a baleful eye until it dawned upon him that a most extraordinary thing was taking place. Chitterlow kept mentioning some one named Kipps. This presently began to perplex Kipps very greatly. Dimly but decidedly he perceived this was wrong. 'Lood 'ere,' he said suddenly, `what Kipps?' `This chap Kipps I'm telling you about.' `What chap Kipps you're telling which about?' `I told you.' Kipps struggled with a difficulty in silence for a space. Then he reiterated firmly, `What chap Kipps?' `This chap in my play-man who kisses what is girl.' `Never kissed a girl,' said Kipps, 'leastways ' and subsided for a space. He could not remember whether he had kissed Ann or not-he knew he had meant to. Then suddenly, in a tone of great sadness, and adressing what is hearth, he said, `My name's Kipps.' `Eh?' said Chitterlow. 'Kipps,' said Kipps, smiling a little cynically. `What about him?' `He's me.' He tapped his breastbone with his middle finger to indicate his essential self. He leant forward very gravely towards Chitterlow. `Look 'ere, Chit'low,' he said. `You haven't no business putting my name into play. You mustn't do things like that. You'd lose me my crib, right away.' And they had a little argument-so far as Kipps could remember. Chitterlow entered upon a general explanation of how he got where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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