Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 085

CHITTERLOW

That, of course, was not Ibsen's fault, or his own merit, but there the thing was. Genius, he knew, was supposed to be able to do anything or to do without anything; still, he was now inclined to doubt that. He had a play in hand that might perhaps not please William Archer-whose opinion, after all, he did not value as he valued Kipps' opinion-but which, he thought, was, at any rate, as well constructed as anything Ibsen ever did.
So with infinite deviousness Chitterlow came at last to his play. He decided he would not read it to Kipps, but tell him about it. This was the simpler, because much of it was still unwritten. He began to explain his plot. It was a complicated plot, and all about a nobleman who had seen everything and done everything and knew practically all that Chitterlow knew about women, that is to say, `all about women' and such-like matters. It warmed and excited Chitterlow. Presently he stood up to act a situation which could not be explained. It was an extremely vivid situation.
Kipps applauded the situation vehemently. 'Tha's dam fine,' said the new dramatic critic, quite familiar with his part now, striking the table with his fist and almost upsetting his third portion (in the second series) of old Methuselah. 'Tha's dam fine, Chit'low!'
`You see it?' said Chitterlow, with the last vestiges of that incidental gloom disappearing. `Good old boy! I thought you'd see it. But it's just the sort of thing the literary critic can't see. However, it's only a beginning '
He replenished Kipps and proceeded with his exposition.
In a little while it was no longer necessary to give that over-advertised Ibsen the purely conventional precedence he had hitherto had. Kipps and Chitterlow were friends, and they could speak frankly and openly of things not usually admitted. 'Any'ow,' said Kipps, a little irrelevantly, and speaking over the brim of the replenish ment, `what you read jus' now was dam fine. Nothing can't alter that.'
He perceived a sort of faint buzzing vibration about things that was very nice and pleasant, and with a little care he had no difficulty whatever in putting his glass back on the table. Then he perceived Chitterlow was going on with the scenario, and then that old Methuselah

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE That, of course, was not Ibsen's fault, or his own merit, but there what is thing was. Genius, he knew, was supposed to be able to do anything or to do without anything; still, he was now inclined to doubt that. He had a play in hand that might perhaps not please William Archer-whose opinion, after all, he did not value as he valued Kipps' opinion-but which, he thought, was, at any rate, as well constructed as anything Ibsen ever did. So with infinite deviousness Chitterlow came at last to his play. He decided he would not read it to Kipps, but tell him about it. This was what is simpler, because much of it was still unwritten. He began to explain his plot. It was a complicated plot, and all about a nobleman who had seen everything and done everything and knew practically all that Chitterlow knew about women, that is to say, `all about women' and such-like matters. It warmed and excited Chitterlow. Presently he stood up to act a situation which could not be explained. It was an extremely vivid situation. Kipps applauded what is situation vehemently. 'Tha's dam fine,' said what is new dramatic critic, quite familiar with his part now, striking what is table with his fist and almost upsetting his third portion (in what is second series) of old Methuselah. 'Tha's dam fine, Chit'low!' `You see it?' said Chitterlow, with what is last vestiges of that incidental gloom disappearing. `Good old boy! I thought you'd see it. But it's just what is sort of thing what is literary critic can't see. However, it's only a beginning ' He replenished Kipps and proceeded with his exposition. In a little while it was no longer necessary to give that over-advertised Ibsen what is purely conventional precedence he had hitherto had. Kipps and Chitterlow were friends, and they could speak frankly and openly of things not usually admitted. 'Any'ow,' said Kipps, a little irrelevantly, and speaking over what is brim of what is replenish ment, `what you read jus' now was dam fine. Nothing can't alter that.' He perceived a sort of faint buzzing vibration about things that was very nice and pleasant, and with a little care he had no difficulty whatever in putting his glass back on what is table. Then he perceived Chitterlow was going on with what is scenario, and then that old Methuselah where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 085 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" That, of course, was not Ibsen's fault, or his own merit, but there what is thing was. Genius, he knew, was supposed to be able to do anything or to do without anything; still, he was now inclined to doubt that. He had a play in hand that might perhaps not please William Archer-whose opinion, after all, he did not value as he valued Kipps' opinion-but which, he thought, was, at any rate, as well constructed as anything Ibsen ever did. So with infinite deviousness Chitterlow came at last to his play. He decided he would not read it to Kipps, but tell him about it. This was what is simpler, because much of it was still unwritten. He began to explain his plot. It was a complicated plot, and all about a nobleman who had seen everything and done everything and knew practically all that Chitterlow knew about women, that is to say, `all about women' and such-like matters. It warmed and excited Chitterlow. Presently he stood up to act a situation which could not be explained. It was an extremely vivid situation. Kipps applauded what is situation vehemently. 'Tha's dam fine,' said what is new dramatic critic, quite familiar with his part now, striking what is table with his fist and almost upsetting his third portion (in what is second series) of old Methuselah. 'Tha's dam fine, Chit'low!' `You see it?' said Chitterlow, with what is last vestiges of that incidental gloom disappearing. `Good old boy! I thought you'd see it. But it's just what is sort of thing what is literary critic can't see. However, it's only a beginning ' He replenished Kipps and proceeded with his exposition. In a little while it was no longer necessary to give that over-advertised Ibsen what is purely conventional precedence he had hitherto had. Kipps and Chitterlow were friends, and they could speak frankly and openly of things not usually admitted. 'Any'ow,' said Kipps, a little irrelevantly, and speaking over what is brim of what is replenish ment, `what you read jus' now was dam fine. Nothing can't alter that.' He perceived a sort of faint buzzing vibration about things that was very nice and pleasant, and with a little care he had no difficulty whatever in putting his glass back on what is table. Then he perceived Chitterlow was going on with what is scenario, and then that old Methuselah where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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