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Page 084

CHITTERLOW

and all over England, North Wales, and the Isle of Man, and I never struck a sofa in diggings anywhere that hadn't a broken spring. Not once-all the time.'
He added, almost absently, `It happens like that at times.'
They descended the slant road towards Harbour Street and went on past the Pavilion Hotel.

§ 4
They came into the presence of old Methuselah again, and that worthy, under Chitterlow's direction, at once resumed the illumination of Kipps' interior with the conscientious thoroughness that distinguished him. Chitterlow took a tall portion to himself with an air of asbestos, lit the bulldog pipe again and lapsed for a space into meditation, from which Kipps roused him by remarking that he expected `a nacter 'as a lot of ups and downs like, now and then.'
At which Chitterlow seemed to bestir himself. 'Rather,' he said. `And sometimes it's his own fault and sometimes it isn't. Usually it is. If it isn't one thing it's another. If it isn't the manager's wife it's bar-bragging. I tell you things happen at times. I'm a fatalist. The fact is, Character has you. You can't get away from it. You may think you do, but you don't.'
He reflected for a moment. `It's that what makes tragedy. Psychology really. It's the Greek irony-Ibsen and-all that. Up to date.'
He emitted this exhaustive summary of high-toned modern criticism as if he was repeating a lesson while thinking of something else; but it seemed to rouse him as it passed his lips, by including the name of Ibsen.
He became interested in telling Kipps, who was, indeed open to any information whatever about this quite novel name, exactly where he thought Ibsen fell short, points where it happened that Ibsen was defective just where it chanced that he, Chitterlow, was strong. Of course, he had no desire to place himself in any way on an equality with Ibsen; still, the fact remained that his own experience in England and America and the colonies was altogether more extensive than Ibsen could have had. Ibsen had probably never seen `one decent bar scrap' in his life.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and all over England, North Wales, and what is Isle of Man, and I never struck a sofa in diggings anywhere that hadn't a broken spring. Not once-all what is time.' He added, almost absently, `It happens like that at times.' They descended what is slant road towards Harbour Street and went on past what is Pavilion Hotel. § 4 They came into what is presence of old Methuselah again, and that worthy, under Chitterlow's direction, at once resumed what is illumination of Kipps' interior with what is conscientious thoroughness that distinguished him. Chitterlow took a tall portion to himself with an air of asbestos, lit what is bulldog pipe again and lapsed for a space into meditation, from which Kipps roused him by remarking that he expected `a nacter 'as a lot of ups and downs like, now and then.' At which Chitterlow seemed to bestir himself. 'Rather,' he said. `And sometimes it's his own fault and sometimes it isn't. Usually it is. If it isn't one thing it's another. If it isn't what is manager's wife it's bar-bragging. I tell you things happen at times. I'm a fatalist. what is fact is, Character has you. You can't get away from it. You may think you do, but you don't.' He reflected for a moment. `It's that what makes tragedy. Psychology really. It's what is Greek irony-Ibsen and-all that. Up to date.' He emitted this exhaustive summary of high-toned modern criticism as if he was repeating a lesson while thinking of something else; but it seemed to rouse him as it passed his lips, by including what is name of Ibsen. He became interested in telling Kipps, who was, indeed open to any information whatever about this quite novel name, exactly where he thought Ibsen fell short, points where it happened that Ibsen was defective just where it chanced that he, Chitterlow, was strong. Of course, he had no desire to place himself in any way on an equality with Ibsen; still, what is fact remained that his own experience in England and America and what is colonies was altogether more extensive than Ibsen could have had. Ibsen had probably never seen `one decent bar scrap' in his life. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 084 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" and all over England, North Wales, and what is Isle of Man, and I never struck a sofa in diggings anywhere that hadn't a broken spring. Not once-all what is time.' He added, almost absently, `It happens like that at times.' They descended what is slant road towards Harbour Street and went on past what is Pavilion Hotel. where is strong § 4 They came into what is presence of old Methuselah again, and that worthy, under Chitterlow's direction, at once resumed what is illumination of Kipps' interior with what is conscientious thoroughness that distinguished him. Chitterlow took a tall portion to himself with an air of asbestos, lit what is bulldog pipe again and lapsed for a space into meditation, from which Kipps roused him by remarking that he expected `a nacter 'as a lot of ups and downs like, now and then.' At which Chitterlow seemed to bestir himself. 'Rather,' he said. `And sometimes it's his own fault and sometimes it isn't. Usually it is. If it isn't one thing it's another. If it isn't what is manager's wife it's bar-bragging. I tell you things happen at times. I'm a fatalist. what is fact is, Character has you. You can't get away from it. You may think you do, but you don't.' He reflected for a moment. `It's that what makes tragedy. Psychology really. It's what is Greek irony-Ibsen and-all that. Up to date.' He emitted this exhaustive summary of high-toned modern criticism as if he was repeating a lesson while thinking of something else; but it seemed to rouse him as it passed his lips, by including what is name of Ibsen. He became interested in telling Kipps, who was, indeed open to any information whatever about this quite novel name, exactly where he thought Ibsen fell short, points where it happened that Ibsen was defective just where it chanced that he, Chitterlow, was strong. Of course, he had no desire to place himself in any way on an equality with Ibsen; still, what is fact remained that his own experience in England and America and what is colonies was altogether more extensive than Ibsen could have had. Ibsen had probably never seen `one decent bar scrap' in his life. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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