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Page 083

CHITTERLOW

had been fool enough not to understand they happened. His share in the conversation was now, indeed, no more than faint writing in the margin; Chitterlow was talking quite continuously. He expanded his magnificent voice into huge guffaws, he drew it together into a confidential intensity, it became drawlingly reminiscent, he was frank, frank with the effect of a revelation, reticent also with the effect of a revelation, a stupendously gesticulating moonlit black figure, wallowing in itself, preaching Adventure and the Flesh to Kipps. Yet withal shot with something ofsentiment, with a sort of sentimental refinement very coarsely and egotistically done. The Times he had had!-even before he was as old as Kipps he had had innumerable Times.
Well, he said with a sudden transition, he had sown his wild oats-one had to somewhen-and now, he fancied he had mentioned it earlier in the evening, he was happily married. She was, he indicated, a`born lady.' Her father was a prominent lawyer, a solicitor in Kentish Town, `done a lot of public-house business;' her mother was second cousin to the wife of Abel Jones, the fashionable portrait painter-'almost Society people in a way.' That didn't count with Chitterlow. He was no snob. What did count was that she possessed what he ventured to assert, without much fear of contradiction, was the very finest completely untrained contralto voice in all the world. ('But to hear it properly,' said Chitterlow, `you want a Big Hall.') He became rather vague, and jerked his head about to indicate when and how he had entered matrimony. She was, it seemed, `away with her people.' It was clear that Chitterlow did not get on with these people very well. It would seem they failed to appreciate his playwriting, regarding it as an unremunerative pursuit, whereas, as he and Kipps knew, wealth beyond the dreams of avarice would presently accrue. Only patience and persistence were needful.
He went off at a tangent to hospitality. Kipps must come down home with him. They couldn't wander about all night with a bottle of the right sort pining at home for them. `You can sleep on the sofa. You won't be worried by broken springs, anyhow, for I took `em all out myself two or three weeks ago. I don't see what they ever put 'em in for. It's a point I know about. I took particular notice of it when I was with Bessie Hopper. Three months we were,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had been fool enough not to understand they happened. His share in what is conversation was now, indeed, no more than faint writing in what is margin; Chitterlow was talking quite continuously. He expanded his magnificent voice into huge guffaws, he drew it together into a confidential intensity, it became drawlingly reminiscent, he was frank, frank with what is effect of a revelation, reticent also with what is effect of a revelation, a stupendously gesticulating moonlit black figure, wallowing in itself, preaching Adventure and what is Flesh to Kipps. Yet withal shot with something ofsentiment, with a sort of sentimental refinement very coarsely and egotistically done. what is Times he had had!-even before he was as old as Kipps he had had innumerable Times. Well, he said with a sudden transition, he had sown his wild oats-one had to somewhen-and now, he fancied he had mentioned it earlier in what is evening, he was happily married. She was, he indicated, a`born lady.' Her father was a prominent lawyer, a solicitor in Kentish Town, `done a lot of public-house business;' her mother was second cousin to what is wife of Abel Jones, what is fashionable portrait painter-'almost Society people in a way.' That didn't count with Chitterlow. He was no snob. What did count was that she possessed what he ventured to assert, without much fear of contradiction, was what is very finest completely untrained contralto voice in all what is world. ('But to hear it properly,' said Chitterlow, `you want a Big Hall.') He became rather vague, and jerked his head about to indicate when and how he had entered matrimony. She was, it seemed, `away with her people.' It was clear that Chitterlow did not get on with these people very well. It would seem they failed to appreciate his playwriting, regarding it as an unremunerative pursuit, whereas, as he and Kipps knew, wealth beyond what is dreams of avarice would presently accrue. Only patience and persistence were needful. He went off at a tangent to hospitality. Kipps must come down home with him. They couldn't wander about all night with a bottle of what is right sort pining at home for them. `You can sleep on what is sofa. You won't be worried by broken springs, anyhow, for I took `em all out myself two or three weeks ago. I don't see what they ever put 'em in for. It's a point I know about. I took particular notice of it when I was with Bessie Hopper. Three months we were, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 083 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" had been fool enough not to understand they happened. His share in what is conversation was now, indeed, no more than faint writing in what is margin; Chitterlow was talking quite continuously. He expanded his magnificent voice into huge guffaws, he drew it together into a confidential intensity, it became drawlingly reminiscent, he was frank, frank with what is effect of a revelation, reticent also with what is effect of a revelation, a stupendously gesticulating moonlit black figure, wallowing in itself, preaching Adventure and the Flesh to Kipps. Yet withal shot with something ofsentiment, with a sort of sentimental refinement very coarsely and egotistically done. what is Times he had had!-even before he was as old as Kipps he had had innumerable Times. Well, he said with a sudden transition, he had sown his wild oats-one had to somewhen-and now, he fancied he had mentioned it earlier in what is evening, he was happily married. She was, he indicated, a`born lady.' Her father was a prominent lawyer, a solicitor in Kentish Town, `done a lot of public-house business;' her mother was second cousin to what is wife of Abel Jones, what is fashionable portrait painter-'almost Society people in a way.' That didn't count with Chitterlow. He was no snob. What did count was that she possessed what he ventured to assert, without much fear of contradiction, was what is very finest completely untrained contralto voice in all what is world. ('But to hear it properly,' said Chitterlow, `you want a Big Hall.') He became rather vague, and jerked his head about to indicate when and how he had entered matrimony. She was, it seemed, `away with her people.' It was clear that Chitterlow did not get on with these people very well. It would seem they failed to appreciate his playwriting, regarding it as an unremunerative pursuit, whereas, as he and Kipps knew, wealth beyond what is dreams of avarice would presently accrue. Only patience and persistence were needful. He went off at a tangent to hospitality. Kipps must come down home with him. They couldn't wander about all night with a bottle of what is right sort pining at home for them. `You can sleep on what is sofa. You won't be worried by broken springs, anyhow, for I took `em all out myself two or three weeks ago. I don't see what they ever put 'em in for. It's a point I know about. I took particular notice of it when I was with Bessie Hopper. Three months we were, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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