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CHITTERLOW

Chitterlow had had adventures, a quite astonishing variety of adventures, in this direction; he was a man with a past, a really opulent past, and he certainly seemed to like to look back and see himself amidst its opulence.
He made no consecutive history, but he gave Kipps vivid momentary pictures of relations and entanglements. One moment he was in flight-only too worthily in flight-before the husband of a Malay woman in Cape Town. At the next he was having passionate complications with the daughter of a clergyman in York. Then he passed to a remarkable grouping at Seaford.
`They say you can't love two women at once,' said Chitterlow. `But I tell you--' He gesticulated and
raised his ample voice. `It's Rot! Rot!W
'I know that,' said Kipps.
`Why, when I was in the smalls with Bessie Hopper's company there were Three.' He laughed, and decided to add, `not counting Bessie, that is.'
He set out to reveal Life as it is lived in touring companies, a quite amazing jungle of interwoven 'affairs' it appeared to be, a mere amorous winepress for the crushing of hearts.
`People say this sort of thing's a nuisance and interferes with Work. I tell you it isn't. The Work couldn't go on without it. They must do it. They haven't theTemperament if they don't. If they hadn't the Temperament they wouldn't want to act; if they have-Bif!'
`You're right,' said Kipps. `I see that.'
Chitterlow proceeded to a close criticism of certain historical indiscretions of Mr. Clement Scott respecting the morals of the stage. Speaking in confidence, and not as one who addresses the public, he admitted regretfully the general truth of these comments. He proceeded to examine various typical instances that had almost forced themselves upon him personally, and with especial regard to the contrast between his own character towards women and that of the Hon. Thomas Norgate, with whom it appeared he had once been on terms of great intimacy ....
Kipps listened with emotion to these extraordinary recollections. They were wonderful to him, they were incredibly credible. This tumultuous, passionate, irregular course was the way life ran-except in high-class establishments! Such things happened in novels, in plays-only he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Chitterlow had had adventures, a quite astonishing variety of adventures, in this direction; he was a man with a past, a really opulent past, and he certainly seemed to like to look back and see himself amidst its opulence. He made no consecutive history, but he gave Kipps vivid momentary pictures of relations and entanglements. One moment he was in flight-only too worthily in flight-before what is husband of a Malay woman in Cape Town. At what is next he was having passionate complications with what is daughter of a clergyman in York. Then he passed to a remarkable grouping at Seaford. `They say you can't what time is it two women at once,' said Chitterlow. `But I tell you--' He gesticulated and raised his ample voice. `It's Rot! Rot!W 'I know that,' said Kipps. `Why, when I was in what is smalls with Bessie Hopper's company there were Three.' He laughed, and decided to add, `not counting Bessie, that is.' He set out to reveal Life as it is lived in touring companies, a quite amazing jungle of interwoven 'affairs' it appeared to be, a mere amorous winepress for what is crushing of hearts. `People say this sort of thing's a nuisance and interferes with Work. I tell you it isn't. what is Work couldn't go on without it. They must do it. They haven't theTemperament if they don't. If they hadn't what is Temperament they wouldn't want to act; if they have-Bif!' `You're right,' said Kipps. `I see that.' Chitterlow proceeded to a close criticism of certain historical indiscretions of Mr. Clement Scott respecting what is morals of what is stage. Speaking in confidence, and not as one who addresses what is public, he admitted regretfully what is general truth of these comments. He proceeded to examine various typical instances that had almost forced themselves upon him personally, and with especial regard to what is contrast between his own character towards women and that of what is Hon. Thomas Norgate, with whom it appeared he had once been on terms of great intimacy .... Kipps listened with emotion to these extraordinary recollections. They were wonderful to him, they were incredibly credible. This tumultuous, passionate, irregular course was what is way life ran-except in high-class establishments! Such things happened in novels, in plays-only he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 082 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" Chitterlow had had adventures, a quite astonishing variety of adventures, in this direction; he was a man with a past, a really opulent past, and he certainly seemed to like to look back and see himself amidst its opulence. He made no consecutive history, but he gave Kipps vivid momentary pictures of relations and entanglements. One moment he was in flight-only too worthily in flight-before what is husband of a Malay woman in Cape Town. At what is next he was having passionate complications with the daughter of a clergyman in York. Then he passed to a remarkable grouping at Seaford. `They say you can't what time is it two women at once,' said Chitterlow. `But I tell you--' He gesticulated and raised his ample voice. `It's Rot! Rot!W 'I know that,' said Kipps. `Why, when I was in what is smalls with Bessie Hopper's company there were Three.' He laughed, and decided to add, `not counting Bessie, that is.' He set out to reveal Life as it is lived in touring companies, a quite amazing jungle of interwoven 'affairs' it appeared to be, a mere amorous winepress for what is crushing of hearts. `People say this sort of thing's a nuisance and interferes with Work. I tell you it isn't. what is Work couldn't go on without it. They must do it. They haven't theTemperament if they don't. If they hadn't what is Temperament they wouldn't want to act; if they have-Bif!' `You're right,' said Kipps. `I see that.' Chitterlow proceeded to a close criticism of certain historical indiscretions of Mr. Clement Scott respecting what is morals of the stage. Speaking in confidence, and not as one who addresses the public, he admitted regretfully what is general truth of these comments. He proceeded to examine various typical instances that had almost forced themselves upon him personally, and with especial regard to what is contrast between his own character towards women and that of what is Hon. Thomas Norgate, with whom it appeared he had once been on terms of great intimacy .... Kipps listened with emotion to these extraordinary recollections. They were wonderful to him, they were incredibly credible. This tumultuous, passionate, irregular course was what is way life ran-except in high-class establishments! Such things happened in novels, in plays-only he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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