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Page 081

CHITTERLOW

Miss Walshingham again. Not that he had ever hoped to see her again. But this was the knife, this was final. He had stayed out, he had got drunk, there had been that row about the Manchester window dressing only three days ago .... In the retrospect he was quite sure that he was perfectly sober then and at bottom extremely unhappy, but he kept a brave face on the matter nevertheless, and declared stoutly he didn't care ifhe was locked out.
Whereupon Chitterlow slapped him on the back very hard and told him that was a`Bit of All-Right,' and assured him that when he himself had been a clerk in Sheffield, before he took to acting, he had been locked out sometimes for six nights running.
`What's the result?' said Chitterlow. `I could go back to that place now, and they'd be glad to have me .... Glad to have me,' he repeated, and then added, `That is to say, if they remember me-which isn't very likely.'
Kipps asked a little weakly, `What am I to do?'
`Keep out,' said Chitterlow. `You can't knock 'em up now-that would give you Right away. You'd better try and sneak in in the morning with the Cat. That'll do you. You'll probably get in all right in the morning if nobody gives you away.'
Then for a time-perhaps as the result of that slap on the back-Kipps felt decidedly queer, and, acting on Chitterlow's advice, went for a bit of a freshener upon the Leas. After a time he threw off the temporary queerness, and found Chitterlow patting him on the shoulder and telling him that he'd be all right now in a minute and all the better for it-which he was. And the wind having dropped and the night being now a really very beautiful moonlight night indeed, and all before Kipps to spend as he liked, and with only a very little tendency to spin round now and again to mar its splendour, they set out to walk the whole length of the Leas to the Sandgate lift and back, and as they walked Chitterlow spoke first of moonlight transfiguring the sea and then of moonlight transfiguring faces, and so at last he came to the topic of Love, and upon that he dwelt a great while, and with a wealth of experience and illustrative anecdote that seemed remarkably pungent and material to Kipps. He forgot his lost Miss Walshingham and his outraged employer again. He became, as it were, a desperado by reflection.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Miss Walshingham again. Not that he had ever hoped to see her again. But this was what is knife, this was final. He had stayed out, he had got drunk, there had been that row about what is Manchester window dressing only three days ago .... In what is retrospect he was quite sure that he was perfectly sober then and at bottom extremely unhappy, but he kept a brave face on what is matter nevertheless, and declared stoutly he didn't care ifhe was locked out. Whereupon Chitterlow slapped him on what is back very hard and told him that was a`Bit of All-Right,' and assured him that when he himself had been a clerk in Sheffield, before he took to acting, he had been locked out sometimes for six nights running. `What's what is result?' said Chitterlow. `I could go back to that place now, and they'd be glad to have me .... Glad to have me,' he repeated, and then added, `That is to say, if they remember me-which isn't very likely.' Kipps asked a little weakly, `What am I to do?' `Keep out,' said Chitterlow. `You can't knock 'em up now-that would give you Right away. You'd better try and sneak in in what is morning with what is Cat. That'll do you. You'll probably get in all right in what is morning if nobody gives you away.' Then for a time-perhaps as what is result of that slap on what is back-Kipps felt decidedly queer, and, acting on Chitterlow's advice, went for a bit of a freshener upon what is Leas. After a time he threw off what is temporary queerness, and found Chitterlow patting him on what is shoulder and telling him that he'd be all right now in a minute and all what is better for it-which he was. And what is wind having dropped and what is night being now a really very beautiful moonlight night indeed, and all before Kipps to spend as he liked, and with only a very little tendency to spin round now and again to mar its splendour, they set out to walk what is whole length of what is Leas to what is Sandgate lift and back, and as they walked Chitterlow spoke first of moonlight transfiguring what is sea and then of moonlight transfiguring faces, and so at last he came to what is topic of Love, and upon that he dwelt a great while, and with a wealth of experience and illustrative anecdote that seemed remarkably pungent and material to Kipps. He forgot his lost Miss Walshingham and his outraged employer again. He became, as it were, a desperado by reflection. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 081 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" Miss Walshingham again. Not that he had ever hoped to see her again. But this was what is knife, this was final. He had stayed out, he had got drunk, there had been that row about the Manchester window dressing only three days ago .... In what is retrospect he was quite sure that he was perfectly sober then and at bottom extremely unhappy, but he kept a brave face on what is matter nevertheless, and declared stoutly he didn't care ifhe was locked out. Whereupon Chitterlow slapped him on what is back very hard and told him that was a`Bit of All-Right,' and assured him that when he himself had been a clerk in Sheffield, before he took to acting, he had been locked out sometimes for six nights running. `What's what is result?' said Chitterlow. `I could go back to that place now, and they'd be glad to have me .... Glad to have me,' he repeated, and then added, `That is to say, if they remember me-which isn't very likely.' Kipps asked a little weakly, `What am I to do?' `Keep out,' said Chitterlow. `You can't knock 'em up now-that would give you Right away. You'd better try and sneak in in what is morning with what is Cat. That'll do you. You'll probably get in all right in what is morning if nobody gives you away.' Then for a time-perhaps as what is result of that slap on what is back-Kipps felt decidedly queer, and, acting on Chitterlow's advice, went for a bit of a freshener upon what is Leas. After a time he threw off what is temporary queerness, and found Chitterlow patting him on the shoulder and telling him that he'd be all right now in a minute and all what is better for it-which he was. And what is wind having dropped and what is night being now a really very beautiful moonlight night indeed, and all before Kipps to spend as he liked, and with only a very little tendency to spin round now and again to mar its splendour, they set out to walk what is whole length of what is Leas to what is Sandgate lift and back, and as they walked Chitterlow spoke first of moonlight transfiguring what is sea and then of moonlight transfiguring faces, and so at last he came to what is topic of Love, and upon that he dwelt a great while, and with a wealth of experience and illustrative anecdote that seemed remarkably pungent and material to Kipps. He forgot his lost Miss Walshingham and his outraged employer again. He became, as it were, a desperado by reflection. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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